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Old 10-13-2014, 03:26 PM   #15
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Well, here are some facts:

I carry a 12 ton air/hydraulic jack from harbor Freight and a air compressor powerful enough to jack it up.

I often use this jack for all sorts of things, even (twice) changing tires.

The first time I jacked it up and someone else changed it (my rig)

The other time I did the change (Friend's rig) myself.

Once I jacked it up I got out my air impact wrench and socket to remove the lugs,, the 1/2 inch industrial weight gun was not really enough, I had to exceed the max pressure to get it to remove the lugs. (I likely could have done it with the proper wrench.

I was able to load the flat into the friend's pick up.

I am 6'2" by over 300 pounds and routinely pick up 250 pound loads, 200 is easy, 250 about the limit as was that tire and rim.

My recommendation is to carry two things:

1: 12 ton air/hydraulic (or larger) jack, cause they have MANY USES (Short story follows)

2; Coach net card.. Cause they have ONE use, when you break down they call the tow/tire guy.


Promised short story:
Fellow RVer was having problems getting his 5er up on leveling blocks .. i finally told him to get it level and then we will pick it up and move the blocks so they are properly under the tires, I can only pick up 12 tons (He looked at me rather strangely, till I broke out the jack and compressor, then he understood) Worked too.
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Old 10-13-2014, 04:08 PM   #16
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A bottle jack, 6 or 8 ton, may come in handy to force a jack in your lift system especially the HWH if jack piston binds in cylinder, lift chassis rail and drop with jack blocks under jack pad.
Sometimes opening the jack solenoid does not help to get jack up to drive coach.
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Old 10-13-2014, 11:29 PM   #17
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A hydraulic bottle jack is much like a pocket knife to this old retired farmer, too many uses for each. I will have each close, as well as my Good Sam Roadside also.


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Old 10-13-2014, 11:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D Lindy View Post
Tire service trucks have hyd. cranes on the rear of their trucks to lift the tire in and out of the back of the trucks, they also have large air compressors to run their 1" air impact wrench to provide 450 ft lbs of torque to change the tires.
I have a " air wrench that will go to 600 ft lbs that I carry. I also have a Proto torque multiplier and a 300 ft lb torque wrench. With the torque multiplier I can get 500 ft lbs with only 152 ft lbs on the wrench.
However I NEVER plan to take a wheel off to change a flat. Coach Net will call a tire truck for me even if the tire repair is my cost.
I carry a 5 ton and now a 20 ton jack even though the leveling jacks will easily lift the whole rig if needed.
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Old 10-14-2014, 01:19 AM   #19
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Very good advice in the responses above, get the roadside asst. on your insurance, and let the Tire service tech. do his job! In the 35+ years of trucking, I never attempted changing a tire, except in my driveway, with the proper air tools! And in my later years, I would call in the pro to do! If you maintain your tires like you should, you should not have a problem! There is always a exception, and you will find many uses for your bottle jack! JMHO! A tire and rim, steel or alum., will weigh between 120 to 130 lbs!
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Old 10-14-2014, 05:05 PM   #20
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Ditto with Kuzzy and Skip426,

If you really want to learn hot to do a wheel/tire change, go to a truck tire shop and ask if you can volunteer as an apprentice.

This may sound like a joke but I assure you it's not. It takes training to learn the right way to perform a tire/wheel change. Doing it the wrong way is much too hard and very dangerous, not to mention possible damage to your equipment.

If and when you do find a willing shop to get the training, you'll be well aware of why you don't want to do this your self on the side of the road. But do get the training if you can. One day it will be well worth it. And carrying the 20T bottle jack is still a good idea, I never leave home without it.

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Old 10-14-2014, 10:23 PM   #21
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I'm in my early 70's and this year when in Alaska I clipped a stump with the right front tire and broke a valve stem. I do have road service but decided to tackle this myself. I carry a torque multiplier so was able to remove the lug nuts - and I do carry a 20 ton hydralic jack. I found a 2X10 and rolled the tire up and into the back of the tow car then took it to a tire shop and they replaced the valve stem. I took it back and installed the wheel/tire. Granted this is not for everyone but don't sell yourself short on what you can do. Just my thought. Personally, I hate to have someone else fix or take care of my problems (even with road service) that's just me.
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Old 10-15-2014, 05:14 AM   #22
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"There have been times when we boon dock, that we have 'stuck' a rock between the duals and needed to get it out. We have lifted the MH, loosened the dual and removed the rock"

Back in my working days, we used to remove the wheel to get the rocks out, until we figured out we could just let the air out of one tire, pull out the rock and refill.
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Old 10-15-2014, 09:11 AM   #23
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On the topic of bottle Jacks, is there a need for some kind of saddle?
Or do you follow the rule of never lifting by jacking under the axle?

Dan
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Old 10-15-2014, 07:03 PM   #24
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I carry a 20 ton bottle jack and a 24" 1/2"drive breaker bar in my coach at all times and it had saved me on 2 occasions.

What I do is use the RV leveling jacks to unweight the suspension and use the bottle jack to lift the axle enough to get the tire just of the ground. The long handle of the breaker bar gives enough leverage to get the lugs of the wheels without having to strain and then use the bar to lever the wheel of the hub without having to actually lift the wheel. Just reverse the order to reinstall and you would be surprised how little effort it takes. At some point I would like to get a 30" long 3/4" drive breaker bar and socket but I have yet to need it
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Old 10-16-2014, 02:40 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpinvidic View Post
On the topic of bottle Jacks, is there a need for some kind of saddle?
Or do you follow the rule of never lifting by jacking under the axle?

Dan
That's one I've never heard before. Since a bottle jack has such a short stroke or lift range, how would not using it under the axle do you any good.

Just asking, not looking for an argument.

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Old 10-16-2014, 02:57 PM   #26
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I expect that unless you also carry tools including a quality air impact wrench with sockets you will never get the wheel/tire off.
I carry an unmounted spare AND a Coachnet membership
okgc
I agree.
Besides my RVA jacks are capable of safely lifting any tire on my coach OFF the ground, (and holding it there).
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Old 10-16-2014, 09:12 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dtwallace View Post
That's one I've never heard before. Since a bottle jack has such a short stroke or lift range, how would not using it under the axle do you any good.

Just asking, not looking for an argument.

DTW
I think I have read that for certain vehicles, you could bend an axle if jacking in the wrong place.
But maybe everything on these RV's is heavy duty enough that it does not matter.

I would suspect there are places where the suspension mounts to the axle that you could place a jack. I agree, if you lifted the frame, you would have to lift it too high to get the wheels off the ground.

So jacking under a round axle seems risky without a saddle to prevent slipping.....am I wrong on this??

Dan
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Old 10-16-2014, 09:31 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpinvidic View Post
I think I have read that for certain vehicles, you could bend an axle if jacking in the wrong place.
But maybe everything on these RV's is heavy duty enough that it does not matter.

I would suspect there are places where the suspension mounts to the axle that you could place a jack. I agree, if you lifted the frame, you would have to lift it too high to get the wheels off the ground.

So jacking under a round axle seems risky without a saddle to prevent slipping.....am I wrong on this??

Dan

A quick call to any reputable heavy duty tire shop would answer your question. They use very short bottle or air jacks.
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