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View Poll Results: Should big rigs be required to have a TPMS?
Yes 21 24.71%
No 64 75.29%
Voters: 85. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-29-2013, 04:00 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by Mojavian View Post
This is a public safety issue in the purest sense: thousands of vehicles are damaged each year and lives put at risk by violent disintegration of tires on big rigs. They are a routine hazard on the roads, can be particularly dangerous for motorcycles and require the state to pay crews to go picking up the debris on the taxpayer's nickel. No, TPMS wouldn't entirely eliminate this problem, but it would go a long way towards that end. I have been just behind big rigs whose tires have exploded, been sprayed with debris from the blast, and was hella glad I was in my truck and not my bike when it happened. You cannot drive more than a mile on CA-99 between Fresno and the Grapevine without seeing some "alligator" remnants either on the road or just off to the side. So yeah, it is a problem and one that, if the technology exists and works satisfactorily, ought to be mandated.
Please provide a reference for your statement "thousands of vehicles are damaged each year" by tires disintegrating.
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Old 03-30-2013, 12:41 AM   #58
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https://www.aaafoundation.org/sites/...files/VRRD.pdf

Note, this is only the component caused by debris left on the road, not the other component of crashes resulting from underinflated tires. It is also seriously underrepresented because it only reports crashes, not damage done due to the striking of the debris by passing vehicles but that does not result in a crash report.

It also doesn't include the crashes that happen when the truck loses control as a result of the tire failure.

You could also, to satisfy your curiosity in this matter, do a study yourself. Type in "Road debris damage" "alligator damage" truck tire damage, etc., and see how many first-hand reports you could amass from your fellow Americans who have hit or had to swerve to avoid hitting alligators in the road.

I do not have to do this personally, I ride a motorcycle. Our community is keenly aware of the dangers that blowouts cause. It makes me hyperaware and observant on the road. My guess is that plenty of the members of this board have hit an alligator or two over the years or had a blowout themselves and suffered damage as a result.
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Old 03-30-2013, 08:26 AM   #59
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TPMS's are a good idea, making them mandatory.....no way. The TPMS would let the trucker know his tire blew but I don't think he would be going back to pick up the retread chunks laying all over the highway.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:05 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by Mojavian View Post
https://www.aaafoundation.org/sites/...files/VRRD.pdf

Note, this is only the component caused by debris left on the road, not the other component of crashes resulting from underinflated tires. It is also seriously underrepresented because it only reports crashes, not damage done due to the striking of the debris by passing vehicles but that does not result in a crash report.

It also doesn't include the crashes that happen when the truck loses control as a result of the tire failure.

You could also, to satisfy your curiosity in this matter, do a study yourself. Type in "Road debris damage" "alligator damage" truck tire damage, etc., and see how many first-hand reports you could amass from your fellow Americans who have hit or had to swerve to avoid hitting alligators in the road.

I do not have to do this personally, I ride a motorcycle. Our community is keenly aware of the dangers that blowouts cause. It makes me hyperaware and observant on the road. My guess is that plenty of the members of this board have hit an alligator or two over the years or had a blowout themselves and suffered damage as a result.
Thanks for providing the information. Even though it is dated it does provide some good information however it does not support your claim of "thousands", and it discusses ALL road debris not just tire failures and a number of those failures were re-treads coming apart. Would a TPMS have identified this before hand...or the driver doing a proper tire inspection?

I have driven these roads for many years but I must admit that I was not on a motorcycle so maybe there is a difference. I see as much broken furniture and other items on the road side as I see tire treads. I see more people dodging rocks falling off trucks than I do tire debris. If I was on a motorcycle I would be more worried about a rock, that is difficult to see, hitting me in the face than tire debris that I can see.

I understand that you are passionate about this subject but I am an engineer and I deal with data to make my decisions. And from what I read from this report I do not see the data that would warrant a nationwide mandate to install these devices on RV's or large commercial trucks. In addition, I question the current TPMS technology as a way to fix the limited numbers of tire failures that we contributed to over/under inflation, etc. that a TPMS is designed to detect. My fear would be that many would depend too much on these devices and ignore their tire inspection and maintenance even more then they do now.

I searched the NTSB WEB site and found only a few cases where they referenced tire pressure as a "contributing" factor to loss of control/life. A motor coach in Texas (2008) but also pointed to a poorly maintained bridge and occupants not using seat belts or not enough seat belts for the number of passengers. The other was also in Texas where a 15 passenger van lost control/life but clearly stated that the TPMS would not of prevented the blowout because the van was overloaded based on the pressure in the tire. www.ntsb.gov/doclib/recletters/2003/h03_12_17.pdf

Like I have been stating all along we have humans in the mix and you can't legislate "stupid" out of existence (reference the FedEx drive that started this thread). If the technology was 100% full proof and came factory installed I would not ignore it's warning but I would still inspect and do all other tire maintenance that I currently do.
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Old 03-30-2013, 11:47 AM   #61
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Just to clarify the reason tpms were mandated to passenger vehicles was not to protect the public from blowouts, but to help improve national fuel consumption. Under inflated tires can account for as much as 2mpg loss. multiplied by the @300million registered cars that's a lot of gas.
So for that reason it would probably not yeild the same savings on big rigs as they don't tend to vary mpg as much from under inflated tires.
Tpms are for proper inflation not to try and predict a pending blowout. It certainly would help.
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Old 03-30-2013, 02:17 PM   #62
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If you ever had drove an otr truck you would realize why they don't use them. The number of people that have trouble keeping them working on cars and motorhomes being a good reason. Trucks have to dodge road debris as well. Tpms are certainly not foolproof. The next thing would be crash avoidance, and then park assist and who knows what next. People used to know how to drive safely and maintain their vehicles. Now auto manufacturer's seem to think they need to idiot proof vehicles. The old saying fits you can't fix stupid!
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Old 03-30-2013, 11:08 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by greatlakes View Post
Just to clarify the reason tpms were mandated to passenger vehicles was not to protect the public from blowouts, but to help improve national fuel consumption. Under inflated tires can account for as much as 2mpg loss. multiplied by the @300million registered cars that's a lot of gas.
So for that reason it would probably not yeild the same savings on big rigs as they don't tend to vary mpg as much from under inflated tires.
Tpms are for proper inflation not to try and predict a pending blowout. It certainly would help.
Sorry, not true.

The TPMS mandate is a direct response to a growing public safety issue finally and specifically spurred by a series of tread-separation accidents on Firestone tires back in the '90's. Link

It has has nothing to do with mandates for increasing fuel economy, though since you bring it up there's certainly a benefit in that regard....and underinflation as it affects fuel mileage in big trucks is a VERY big deal in the trucking industry. Cummins Link
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Old 03-31-2013, 10:22 AM   #64
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the firestone problem in the 90's was a result of ford trying to make a rough riding vehicle ride smoother by drastically under inflating the tires. as soon as that was corrected, the accidents went away. any yes underinflated tires do affect gas mileage, but, why not? one more rule, with one thousand interpretations wont hurt.
you cant legislate common sense. check your tire pressure every other day if traveling.
give them a thump test every morning. visually inspect your tires every morning. do a walk around before leaving every morning. just a quick overall inspection eliminates a lot of problems. been doing the at& t drivers "circle of safety" since working for them in the 60's.
we have become a nation of obscure regulations and useless laws, mostly resulting in increased cost, not safety.
personal responsibility, and diligence is the answer.
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Old 03-31-2013, 10:42 AM   #65
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:41 AM   #66
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Sorry, not true.

The TPMS mandate is a direct response to a growing public safety issue finally and specifically spurred by a series of tread-separation accidents on Firestone tires back in the '90's. Link

It has has nothing to do with mandates for increasing fuel economy, though since you bring it up there's certainly a benefit in that regard....and underinflation as it affects fuel mileage in big trucks is a VERY big deal in the trucking industry. Cummins Link
Sorry, but it is true!
The proposal originated in 1999 was not gaining enough ground on its own merit until the fuel economy advantages were included into the proposal in 2002. Even in your own link it mentions the savings of 57.5 billion pounds of unnecessary Carbon-Monoxide being saved. So although you are be correct that the under inflation was the original reason TPMS were proposed as a mandate, its not the sole reason it was passed as a mandate. Far from having "nothing to do with it".

More than 100 deaths per year from rollover accidents were attributed to tread separation based on the research of the National High Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Department of transportation. The primary cause for these failures was found to be low tire pressure. In addition, having proper pressure in each tire will allow for better stability and control during operation of the vehicle. Finally, proper inflation pressure leads to better fuel efficiency, which means saving $$$ on gas and helping the environment.
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Old 03-31-2013, 05:53 PM   #67
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I think we all agree that proper inflation is very important for both the life of the tires and fuel milage as well. However, mandating the use of a TPMS would be just another rediculous law on the books and would be almost impossible to enforce.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:04 PM   #68
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I think we all agree that proper inflation is very important for both the life of the tires and fuel milage as well. However, mandating the use of a TPMS would be just another rediculous law on the books and would be almost impossible to enforce.

End of thread now?
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:12 PM   #69
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End of thread now?
X2 Please!
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:15 PM   #70
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Kindly unsubscribe if you no longer wish to be a part of this thread. Thanks
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