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Old 03-11-2014, 08:18 PM   #1
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Single wide tires

I searched but didn't see anything on this.

Has anyone ever considered running single wide tires? For example, the Michelin X One types?

I ask out of curiosity as I don't need tires today, but the Michelin site seems to imply the single wide tires are better performing overall (road resistance, weight, overall costs). When I searched the Michelin site for tires for "recreational vehicles", they listed these as being compatible.

When I do need tires I was thinking this may be something I want to consider. Would anyone consider using these instead of duals? Are there downsides to these?
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Old 03-11-2014, 08:32 PM   #2
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To switch to the single tires you will also have to buy new rims which makes it a lot more expensive to switch.

Jon
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:30 PM   #3
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The new rims I saw in Quartzsite at a special show price were about 1400 bucks a pop, $2800 for the pair. Yikes!
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:39 PM   #4
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I was at my local truck stop recently, and they had one of the tires on display. The parts man told me that when they do a service call on them, they always take a new rim, because the rim usually has to be replaced due to it being damaged when the tire goes flat. Eddie Elk.
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:46 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bokobird View Post
I searched but didn't see anything on this. Has anyone ever considered running single wide tires? For example, the Michelin X One types? I ask out of curiosity as I don't need tires today, but the Michelin site seems to imply the single wide tires are better performing overall (road resistance, weight, overall costs). When I searched the Michelin site for tires for "recreational vehicles", they listed these as being compatible. When I do need tires I was thinking this may be something I want to consider. Would anyone consider using these instead of duals? Are there downsides to these?
Yes, it would be a cost to upgrade the wheels, along with the tires. Regardless, it is getting very popular with the large trucking fleets. It will only be time before these catch on with the RV crowd.

There are very good reasons for fleet trucking companies to make the switch;

1) Costs significantly less at replacement time.
2) Saves hundreds of pounds on the axel.
3) Runs at significantly lower heat.
4) Performance is reported to be better, and much smother.
5) This results in overall lower cost in tire cost over the life of the vehicle.
6) This results in much better MPG savings for fuel.

For the RV crowd, these benefits are as beneficial, but more significant the more miles you drive. When new models offer the choice, and/or start shipping them as a standard feature, that is when you will see more broader acceptance. Current owners will be hard to convince of the benefit because of the upfront cost. Old timers will take further convincing, because they think that they need the security of the two separate tires.

It will take time before seeing this as standard on RV's, but be assured, it will come to pass at some point, and sooner than later if the price of fuel goes up significantly.
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:52 PM   #6
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Somebody, please do this upgrade and report to us all. When we have a few hundred of them on RVs, we will be better educated, yes?

If they are on my next rig when I buy it, I will have it. I will let the virtue of patience rule, not speculation.
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:56 PM   #7
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My son drives truck. The company he used to drive for had all super singles on their trucks. They are lighter which means you can haul more cargo. They ran pneumatic dry bulk trailers so being able to haul more meant more money to be made. He blew one on a drive axle at about 40 mph with a full trailer, 80k total weight. He said it was very loud in the driver's seat when it blew. But he stopped it right away and there was no damage to the rim. I don't think the advantages are that important to the rv'r to justify the cost.
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:57 PM   #8
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if you get a flat you got a flat if you have duallys youcan sometimes limp it in for repairs. think what your options are.
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:57 PM   #9
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No way, when those blow they tear up a lot of $$$$. Theyre fine for line-haul trucks and fuel tankers. I've owned and drove big rigs but these are not going on my mh.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:04 PM   #10
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I have run super singles on the big rig for the last 3 years. Unless you are going to drive 100,000 + miles a year I don't think you will see any benefit on a MH.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:18 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick & Hope View Post
I have run super singles on the big rig for the last 3 years. Unless you are going to drive 100,000 + miles a year I don't think you will see any benefit on a MH.
I was afraid of that. I understood there would be upfront costs and they would likely be expensive due to costs of rims, but the longer term savings is what I was wondering about.

From my understanding in talking to many, it seems hitting 100,000 miles on a set of tires for my coach would be hard to do (I'm not full-timing) given the overall life of tires.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:09 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tedgard01 View Post
Yes, it would be a cost to upgrade the wheels, along with the tires. Regardless, it is getting very popular with the large trucking fleets. It will only be time before these catch on with the RV crowd.

There are very good reasons for fleet trucking companies to make the switch;

1) Costs significantly less at replacement time.
2) Saves hundreds of pounds on the axel.
3) Runs at significantly lower heat.
4) Performance is reported to be better, and much smother.
5) This results in overall lower cost in tire cost over the life of the vehicle.
6) This results in much better MPG savings for fuel.

For the RV crowd, these benefits are as beneficial, but more significant the more miles you drive. When new models offer the choice, and/or start shipping them as a standard feature, that is when you will see more broader acceptance. Current owners will be hard to convince of the benefit because of the upfront cost. Old timers will take further convincing, because they think that they need the security of the two separate tires.

It will take time before seeing this as standard on RV's, but be assured, it will come to pass at some point, and sooner than later if the price of fuel goes up significantly.
The trucking companies are now making a trend AWAY from the Super singles and going back to duals. Why?

1) The singles have a much larger single treaded footprint, almost like looking at a drag racing tire, thus more prone to hydroplaning on wet roads and floating on top of snow and mud thus loss of traction and control. Duals are narrower and are less likely to hydroplane and will dig into snow/mud. OTR drivers claim the number of accidents and mishaps from hydroplaning on wet roads have gone up substantially.

2) Drivers complain about the inability to limp a truck to have a flat repaired on the drives. Drivers complain about the sudden loss of control with a blowout at highway speeds. With duals, and one being flat, you can most likely get to a tire center rather than waiting for hours on a mobile service. You can't do this with super singles. OTR Drivers absolutely hate them.

3) The fuel mileage increases seem to be around .3 to .5 on average. If you drove 200,000+ miles a year I can see that as being a benefit to factor into your return on investment (ROI). Interestingly enough those independent drivers whom are paying their own fuel have mostly chosen not to convert to super singles.

The general consensus is that the pro's do not outweight the con's.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:28 AM   #13
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Use the Google search at the top of the page and search on "Super Single". You will find previous threads on the topic.

In spite of any "advantages" the Super Singles have never caught on.

IMHO, there is no advantage or we would see them on MHs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bokobird View Post
I searched but didn't see anything on this.

Has anyone ever considered running single wide tires? For example, the Michelin X One types?

I ask out of curiosity as I don't need tires today, but the Michelin site seems to imply the single wide tires are better performing overall (road resistance, weight, overall costs). When I searched the Michelin site for tires for "recreational vehicles", they listed these as being compatible.

When I do need tires I was thinking this may be something I want to consider. Would anyone consider using these instead of duals? Are there downsides to these?
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:37 AM   #14
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I like the thought of still having a tire if one of the duals blow.
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