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Old 08-08-2012, 07:53 PM   #1
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Speedometer Problem

We have a 2000 Winnebago Adventurer on a Ford chassis. We recently had a dead battery issue which was resolved, but the speedometer has stopped working. The odometer is still working as well as the other dash instruments. We have tried to come up with wiring diagrams or to find the port to hook up the diagnostic computer to, but have been unsuccessful. Any help to resolve this issue would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
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Old 08-09-2012, 04:14 PM   #2
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In a 2000 rig, you probably have a smart speedo. It's looking for a signal on the instrument bus from the speed sensor. Places to check would be the wiring & connectors at the speedo and the speed detector. You might have to dig through your manuals to find if there are any helps there about location of the speed detector. Or a call to Winnie.
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Old 12-06-2012, 01:44 PM   #3
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did this issue ever get resolved? I had the exact same thing happen with a dead battery, now new battery installed and no speedo (just sits on zero mph). I thought it would as easy as a fuse but there doesn't seem to be one. So any help on this would be breatly appreciated. thanks!
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Old 12-06-2012, 07:06 PM   #4
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Check the speed sensor wich is on the top of the rear axel
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Old 12-07-2012, 09:34 AM   #5
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how would a dead battery cause the sensor to go out? doesn't make sense to me. Maybe it's a coincidence... dead battery, then my speedo doesn't work anymore, oh and also the control module for my steps also went out due to the dead battery... strange.
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:49 AM   #6
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A poorly or improperly designed signal conditioning circuit could fail with a LOW battery. Even thought there is enough voltage to sorta work. Most of us in the field design our circuits to work to 1/2 battery voltage. But not everyone does that. Let me tell you that there are times when it is not that easy to do either. That is the typical design target though. Let's say that you are a newbie design engineer that has been assigned to create an automotive circuit but you don't know about this rule of thumb. Or marketing and your lead engineer are on your case to get it done fast. You might scrimp on the rating of a critical component, choose an inappropriate component, or not add an important component. So this design goes out into the field and occasionally, it's trying to run with a low voltage battery. That causes many of the circuits to have to operate in a linear mode instead of a digital. Linear draws too much current, overheats components, etc. Circuit components, not wanting to be in the linear region, blow.

So, that's how a 'dead' (but usually just a low) battery can cause failures.

BTW, when I'm designing circuits for automotive use, I also have to consider 'Load dumps' which cause 60V spikes to occur on the battery circuitry. That's actually easier to handle then dealing with low battery voltage. Especially chronic low voltage.
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