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Old 05-01-2012, 10:42 PM   #1
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Teflon tape or anti-sieze

I'm in the middle of a Pyrometer install. Got the gauge mounted and wired today and tomorrow I'm drilling and tapping the hole in the exhaust manifold (1/8 NPT). I really want to put a bit of teflon tape around the thermocouple NPT thread but the book says to use anti-sieze. I don't think the two are compatible, tape and anti-sieze.

I'm sure somebody's done this. Is it better to use anti-sieze and run the risk of a small leak around the tapped NPT or seal it up with teflon tape and run the risk of not being able to get the thermocouple out down the road?

Any help would be appreciated.

cheers...
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:48 PM   #2
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Teflon tape won't take the high temps.
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:49 PM   #3
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Anti-seize always in extreme temps.



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Old 05-02-2012, 01:08 AM   #4
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Anti-seize.. I use Nickel-Graphite
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Old 05-02-2012, 05:19 AM   #5
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Teflon may "seal" it for a moment or two but the first time it sees 1200+F, it's gone.
If it REALLY needs to be sealed (and never removed) there's always J-B Weld
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Old 05-02-2012, 05:38 AM   #6
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NPT (national pipe thread) are tapered and you use the anti seize to make sure it will be able to be pulled out if it needs repair. As long as you tighten it down it wont come out. I have been a pipefitter for 20 + years and have never had a pipe loosen up on its own. Just make sure you don't cross thread the fitting it should thread in about 3-4 turns by hand then tighten it down just don't over do it with a 1/8" fitting the threads are pretty fine. And Teflon tape will burn off at high temperatures use nickle graphite anti seize.
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:00 AM   #7
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thanks for all the replies guys. Anti-sieze is the direction I was leaning but I thought it worth the question. Teflon's been used on steam pipe fittings for years, which are pretty hot but nowhere close to 1200+ degrees.

I'll thread the thermocouple today, and finish up that part of the install, but I still have to find a source to tap into for the boost gauge. The ISSPro instruction sheet says there should be a plug on the intake manifold that I can remove, but I haven't had time to go looking for it yet.

Anybody installed a boost gauge on a 1996 Cummins 12 valve mechanical? If so I'd mighty appreciate you sharing where you chose to install the tubing.

cheers...
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:18 AM   #8
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Warning!!! Warning Will Robinson!!

Use EXTREME care when drilling into the exhaust manifold of a turbocharged engine. Some iron debris from the drilling process may be left on the INSIDE of the manifold after the process is complete. If that happens, those iron shavings will enter the turbine side of the turbocharger right at start up and can cause severe damage to the turbine fan blades before exiting to the aftertreatment if so equipped. One way to minimize the possibility of contaminating the turbo is to coat the tip of the drill bit with a heavy grease just before you expect to penetrate the manifold. The grease will hopefully hold the metal filings in suspension so they don't enter the inside. Do the same with the tap. Coat it in grease as well so no debris enters the manifold.
Good luck with your project.
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:38 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelledan View Post
Warning!!! Warning Will Robinson!!

Use EXTREME care when drilling into the exhaust manifold of a turbocharged engine. Some iron debris from the drilling process may be left on the INSIDE of the manifold after the process is complete. If that happens, those iron shavings will enter the turbine side of the turbocharger right at start up and can cause severe damage to the turbine fan blades before exiting to the aftertreatment if so equipped. One way to minimize the possibility of contaminating the turbo is to coat the tip of the drill bit with a heavy grease just before you expect to penetrate the manifold. The grease will hopefully hold the metal filings in suspension so they don't enter the inside. Do the same with the tap. Coat it in grease as well so no debris enters the manifold.
Good luck with your project.
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Fully aware of the danger Dan, but thanks for the heads-up. Of the three standard approaches to drilling this hole (R&R the manifold, step drill like 20 times or final drill with engine running and LOTS of grease) I'm taking the old school 3rd approach. Liberal wheel bearing grease, a nice slow feed with a new bit that peels off lovely curlies with the engine generating pressure from the inside out, it should be fine. Not the first thermocouple to be installed this way, that's for sure.

And if I'm sure that during the process something got away from me and dropped in, then I guess it's manifold R&R time.

cheers...
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:00 PM   #10
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I'd also suggest you magnetize the drill bit and the thread tap. Easy to do with a magnet. Ask Carl :: How can I magnetize drill bits?
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:14 PM   #11
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I have installed several and I prefer to pull the manafold. It takes a little more time but in the end it is easier to drill and tap cleanly. Also piece of mind for my turbos
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:20 PM   #12
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When I installed ours I pulled the turbo (had to come off to replace the housing anyway) and stuffed a rag in the ports. When done drilling and tapping I vacuumed out what I could and pulling the rag out got the rest.
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:42 PM   #13
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Finished up the thermocouple install today. Did it the old school way, basically drilled until I just barely broke through the interior surface (stopped drilling and checked often) then fired up the engine and finished the tap hole at a really slow drill speed. Gets a little warm and takes a little longer to drill that slow but with a really sharp bit you get a nice curly-cue as the drill peels off the material. What isn't pulled out by the drill is blasted out by the internal pressure.

Oh, and all that advise about using lots of heavy grease to "capture" the chips? Absolutely coat the tap, and pull it back out to clean often, but if your drilling with the engine running, by the time you get the bit back in the hole and start drilling the grease is either melted away or blown off the bit

Anywho, all good except I couldn't really do an ops check. The pyro won't move much past 300 at idle. But I *did* see it move, so I know I'm reading a signal. Tomorrow I'll take a run up the canyon, that'll get her heated up.

Thanks again for all the input. There's been a bunch of threads on this very project, and tons of good info.

cheers...
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Old 05-03-2012, 06:42 PM   #14
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How did you get the signal wire from engine to the front ?? Did the pyro gauge
people have a long wire ?? Of course I am assuming you have a diesel pusher and a side radiator .
That and your boost gauge should be standard equipment..
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