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Old 10-02-2016, 11:05 AM   #85
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Originally Posted by JFXG View Post
Your 110/100 trucking standard blends nicely with larger motorhomes as the MHs become more heavily loaded. It has been my observation that a fulltimer MH is more likely to be loaded to the limit than a camping MH.
We are fulltimers, and our DS spends its entire life at or very close to max gross. I set my tires to chart + 5Lbs, which puts me at 110 front and 95 rear.


John & Diane, fulltiming since '12 02 DS40, FL, Cat, '04 Element NHSO RVM103
We snow bird and our tire pressures are the same as yours.
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Old 10-02-2016, 01:47 PM   #86
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I like to compare the tire condition, age out over wear out scenario to trucking. What I've come up with is what works for me, and I'm no way setting it wrong or right for anyone else.
The number one difference in this comparison is use.
But something else that was all new to me when I moved up to the class (A) diesel pusher.
I learned on this form that on RV'ers run the air pressures a lot different than we do in the trucking industry.
RV'er adjust air pressures for Comfort in addition to load capacity.
Adjusting for comfort results in lower air pressures that lead to more flexing of the sidewalls for that extra cushion as most would like to call it.
In most cases in the trucking industry running tire air pressure lower than the standard 110psi for single vs 100psi for duel leads to more frequent tire failures.

Therefore, using the same technique for tire care on my RV as I used for my trucks, I expect at least up to ten years of safe service. Notice I'm saying expected service not what I've experienced. In the RV world, this is still a Learning experience for me.

My decision to run my air pressures this way is based mainly on what I have read on these forums.
I've read of more frequent tire failures out of the blue happening to folks who are running lower air pressures.
At every stop I use a laser thermometer to check my tire temperature. Tire temperatures are consistently cool and rolling resistance is less resulting in better fuel mileage. I frequently inspect my ties for cuts bruises and cupping and of course cracks.
And I'm perfectly satisfied that my tires are serviceable and safe.

I try not to let my tires sit on one spot longer than a month without taking to coach out for a 50 to 100 mile exercise run.
This has worked for me so far, and just my 2cts
DTW
When trying to compare HD Truck with RV one thing to remember is that many RVs have significant side to side load variation with one side always heavier than the other for the life of the trailer. Trucks are usually more evenly loaded side to side. trucks also spend some time very lightly loaded if they ever run less than full weight load. Sometimes the load is less than full weight load if they have high volume load.
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:46 PM   #87
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Acceptable date for new tires

Will be buying new Michelins for my rig. I would like to know if there an acceptable date for tires. Not interested in buying a set of tires that have been on dealer's shelf too long.
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Old 10-03-2016, 11:07 AM   #88
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Most places I have found lately have the XRV"s dated 2016. Michelin made a pretty big run of them
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Old 10-03-2016, 09:39 PM   #89
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I live in Western Washington and had a 2000 Fleetwood Storm (no longer own it). The local Les Schwab tire manager told me that assuming good tread left, the single most important thing was a tire inspection and they look at sidewall cracking as the main issue and that is from sunlight exposure.
My Fleetwood Storm was low mileage, always stored in an enclose garage with plywood under the tires to keep any dampness from direct contact with the tread and since we live in Western Washington not generally exposed to high heat or humidity. The last year we owned it (2015) we took a 3k trip to Yellowstone and I was completely confident in the tires and if I still owned the rig would feel completely confident in the tires.
Bottom line is, I think it just matters about condition of the tire more than time. If you bought the rig new or knew for sure its history, I see no reason to throw out tires just because of time. I know opinions are like belly buttons and we all have them. Now you know mine.
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Old 10-03-2016, 10:18 PM   #90
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Here is the thought process I went through last year. I own a 2004 National Dolphin that had the original Michelin tires with 52,000 miles. I installed a TPM system in 2005 so I am able to monitor tire PSI daily if we're on a trip. Most of our driving is done in the fall & spring with the MH sitting most of the summer. It has been parked when not in use on asphalt, gravel or dirt with normal sun exposure. I do regular inspections of the tire before & during trips.
In 2015 the cracks on the sidewalls were small and evenly distributed and tread wear was even across all tires at 9/32".
So, I had 11 year old tires with even wear and good tread and minimal cracking. I put on my little thinking cap..........if I have a blowout it will cost me at least $2000.00. $300 for a new tire, $500 for a tire company to come out to the boonies (blowouts never happen near a city), possibly a tow truck because half the body is hanging by a thread, $1200.00 in body work, a week in the body shop, hotel for a week, a cancelled trip etc. The little propeller on my thinking cap only had to rotate a few times before I figured out I had already pushed my luck pretty far and it would be best to buy new tires.
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Old 10-03-2016, 10:33 PM   #91
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My mistake 9/32"
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Old 10-06-2016, 11:47 AM   #92
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General comment on the topic.

I think that most can understand that the numerous variables involved such as Ambient temperature, operating temperature, load, and operating speed all can affect the "life" of a tire. Also there is the obvious variation in the numerous components and assembly practice of each tire itself.
All of this adds up to an impossibly complex equation if trying to predict the life of a tire.

While many may understand that if a tire spends it's life in Arizona, Texas, Alabama, Louisianian and Florida it will have a definitely different life span than one that spends its life in new England, even if the load, inflation and speed were magically identical. I do wonder how many have even a passing understanding of the complex nature of manufacturing a tire as seen in THIS animated video. Actual shots of the process here. Here is an alternate view of Truck tire process which would be essentially identical to what is seen in both LT and 22.5" size tires.

Unlike materials like steel or Aluminum, rubber is not a homogeneous material so even minor variations in the raw materials can affect tire life.

Here is a video showing the basic process of preparing rubber before it is applied to steel or polyester cords. Note these are videos of very low tech methods. Modern equipment is much larger and the process is harder to see as there is much more automation behind closed chamber shields.

The estimates of maximum tire life is based on assumptions of the variability of the tire and the variability of the use of the tire. The estimate must also consider the probability of the variables stacking up and the potential for the severity of the tire failure.

Some companies may feel that no greater than 0.5% probability of failure at 7 years is acceptable IF the tire is always operated in North America, never exceeds its max speed rating or is overloaded for the inflation in the tire. Another company may feel that less than 5% at 12 years is the goal.

It is also important to remember that only after thousands of tires have completed years of service can a company know if it made the correct calculations. I do not know of any company that is not constantly working to lower the failure rate or extend the usage time while at the same time trying to meet customer demands for better wear, fuel economy, traction, ride and lower cost.
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Old 10-06-2016, 02:34 PM   #93
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Here is the thought process I went through last year. I own a 2004 National Dolphin that had the original Michelin tires with 52,000 miles. I installed a TPM system in 2005 so I am able to monitor tire PSI daily if we're on a trip. Most of our driving is done in the fall & spring with the MH sitting most of the summer. It has been parked when not in use on asphalt, gravel or dirt with normal sun exposure. I do regular inspections of the tire before & during trips.
In 2015 the cracks on the sidewalls were small and evenly distributed and tread wear was even across all tires at 9/32".
So, I had 11 year old tires with even wear and good tread and minimal cracking. I put on my little thinking cap..........if I have a blowout it will cost me at least $2000.00. $300 for a new tire, $500 for a tire company to come out to the boonies (blowouts never happen near a city), possibly a tow truck because half the body is hanging by a thread, $1200.00 in body work, a week in the body shop, hotel for a week, a cancelled trip etc. The little propeller on my thinking cap only had to rotate a few times before I figured out I had already pushed my luck pretty far and it would be best to buy new tires.

Actually it cost $1,200 for a $700 tire on a holiday and $8,000 in body work on the good side. Bad side you total your rig or dead.
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Old 10-06-2016, 04:21 PM   #94
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I keep hearing people say thousands in damage repair. Surely not everyone is uninsured? Your insurance will cover the damage, less deductable and tire expense of course. Still not good certainly but not the thousands discussed. I've talked to several people lately with damage for one reason or other that seem to forget they are insured. That's what the insurance is for is it not?
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Old 10-07-2016, 05:36 AM   #95
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I keep hearing people say thousands in damage repair. Surely not everyone is uninsured? Your insurance will cover the damage, less deductable and tire expense of course. Still not good certainly but not the thousands discussed. I've talked to several people lately with damage for one reason or other that seem to forget they are insured. That's what the insurance is for is it not?

Cost of damage is cost of damage no matter who pays for it, I am well insured and had 0 out of pocket but it's still a very dangerous event and could be someone life running on old tires which you can't put a price on.
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Old 10-08-2016, 05:16 AM   #96
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Will be buying new Michelins for my rig. I would like to know if there an acceptable date for tires. Not interested in buying a set of tires that have been on dealer's shelf too long.
6 months is acceptable - If your in Indy or close I Highly recommend Indy Tire on 30th street. I buy all of my tires there. Put new Michelin's on (my 4th set ) last year and service is awesome. See or call Brad !
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