Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-15-2012, 03:48 PM   #43
Senior Member
 
Dunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Phx, Arid~zona
Posts: 11,106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidewinder View Post
Both of the tires that blew where Michelin. It sounded like someone shot a shotgun off and believe me they weren’t taking any chances
And Janet Stevens at Michelin would say they were "Run Flat" and send you a letter and a stack of pictures, good enough for framing, showing what a "Run Flat" tire looks like.

I had two blow that were less than two years old. They damaged the right side of my truck bed so bad, it had to be replaced, along with the exhaust pipe. I checked my tire pressure before each trip. Tries that go Kaboom with over 80 PSI are not "Run Flat".
__________________

__________________
2004 32' National Sea Breeze 1311 Class A on a F-53 Chassis, CHF, TST TPMS, 5Star Tune.
If Dunner (RVM23) can't fix it, it ain't broke!
Cheap Handling Fix Poll. Click Here to vote?
Dunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-15-2012, 04:59 PM   #44
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 260
Freebird, let me help you out some more since you seem to think that " OTR truck tires wear the tread out, most RVer's tires 'age' out." in one post and "An RV's use and the reasons our tires go out of service are different than OTR trucks," in another.

You seem to be stuck on one potential difference when there are three firm similarities, hence the benefit of OTR truck experience. Again, to try to help you understand, and I don't know why you haven't understood yet, OTR's and RV's both see and have problems with road hazards. OTR's and RV's both have problems with underinflation, OTR's and RV's both have problems with aged tires. RV's with original tread and OTR's with recaps. There are three similarities where we can learn from those who drive more miles each year in their rigs than we do in our rigs. OTR's and RV's are not totally different, they are very similar on at least the three points I've shown you.

You said: "Ken, I have read many of the treads here" Let me help you with that, they are called threads. To quote you again, "I am a little surprised that you could not figure that out, but that is why this forum exists, to help each other out with useful and helpful information"

Smiley face right back at you,
Ken
__________________

__________________
bucks2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2012, 05:09 PM   #45
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,538
One thing that strikes me about this thread: Most of us are not tire engineers and don't have the expertise to know what caused a tire to fail.

So in effect all you're seeing is opinions and we all know what they are worth!

For instance: can you look at a blown tire and tell if it was run 20% low on pressure (run flat condition) or if it was due to water in the tire (from using "wet" air)?
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2012, 05:36 PM   #46
Senior Member
 
tomwalt's Avatar
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 1,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucks2 View Post
Freebird, let me help you out some more since you seem to think that " OTR truck tires wear the tread out, most RVer's tires 'age' out." in one post and "An RV's use and the reasons our tires go out of service are different than OTR trucks," in another.

You seem to be stuck on one potential difference when there are three firm similarities, hence the benefit of OTR truck experience. Again, to try to help you understand, and I don't know why you haven't understood yet, OTR's and RV's both see and have problems with road hazards. OTR's and RV's both have problems with underinflation, OTR's and RV's both have problems with aged tires. RV's with original tread and OTR's with recaps. There are three similarities where we can learn from those who drive more miles each year in their rigs than we do in our rigs. OTR's and RV's are not totally different, they are very similar on at least the three points I've shown you.

You said: "Ken, I have read many of the treads here" Let me help you with that, they are called threads. To quote you again, "I am a little surprised that you could not figure that out, but that is why this forum exists, to help each other out with useful and helpful information"

Smiley face right back at you,
Ken
This thread is about tread plus tires that are tired. I sure have not figured this out yet, but my method is outlined in Post 37 and I welcome anyone to point out my mistakes or the errors of my ways (other than a few bad habits that I plan to keep). So we should all be happy campers, try to help each other out, and try to be as safe as we can where the tire meets the road.
Freebird - thanks for starting the post - Food for thought.
__________________
Tom and Amy from Northern Virginia.
2000 Allegro 454/Workhorse P32/TST/Crossfire
Life is a DIY project - enjoy it.
tomwalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2012, 06:12 PM   #47
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 86
I guess the thing about this thread that does bother me is knowing, and it serves as a reminder that that Cheapskate, Knothead that wouldn’t listen is the same one that just blew that old tire and is heading straight at me and my family when that old tire blows. Be fugal if you must but PLEASE remember “The life you save” may be mine.
Just a though
Ron
__________________
Sidewinder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2012, 06:26 PM   #48
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 115
Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by freebirdbus View Post
I have seen numerous threads on here dealing with tire dates and age. I know that some tire manufactures recommend replacement at five years from the tire's build date. Tires and the cause of tire failure can be simple or very complex, and I was wondering if anyone here has used tires for eight or ten years or more (specifically 22.5 sizing). The reason that I ask, is the recapped tire industry's use of casings that are that old, and their putting a new tread on to replace the worn out one, and putting that eight to ten year old casing back into service. If a tire had usable tread depth, were dismounted and inspected, and shows no signs of damage or weather checking, why wouldn't the original-ally treaded tire be just as safe as a retreaded one? Please try to limit responses to facts and first hand experience, not conjecture or speculation. Thank you
A big "Thank You" to the many of you who have offered your experiences and strategies for tire "keep it in-service or replace it" evaluation and management. There are numerous reasons, including financial and environmental, for my not wishing to replace otherwise useful tires prematurely. Likewise, I have no wish to compromise my or others safety by utilizing an otherwise good looking tire that by time should not be in service. For the vast majority that understand that, I thank you.
__________________
freebirdbus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2012, 06:50 PM   #49
Senior Member
 
wanderso's Avatar
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,045
Very useful info folks. My 2001 rig recently purchased with 18k miles has tires that look in sweet shape (bf goodrich commercial) but I'm convinced that all but one is original to the rig. The final digit of serial is a 1; one is a 5. The 1 is a bit of a head scratcher because a 2001 class c fleetwood rides on a 2000 chassis and this was the changeover year for DOT numbering. I'm not convinced that these are brand new 2011 tires, yet the 1 also doesn't make sense unless the rolling chassis (chevy) had no wheels and Fleetwood changed them. They should be "0" if original. Heading on a trip to Yellowstone and this thread provides the material with the wife on why to replace them regardless.

Here is a useful link that talks about the tire serial (dot) http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=11
__________________
History: '08 View, '05 Chinook, '01 Jamboree 24D, '78 Apache Popup, 81 Komfort Tlr,
84 Mazda B2000 'w canopy,
Tent from wedding shower in '96
wanderso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2012, 07:19 PM   #50
Senior Member
 
Mochisme's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Shoreline, WA
Posts: 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderso View Post
Very useful info folks. My 2001 rig recently purchased with 18k miles has tires that look in sweet shape (bf goodrich commercial) but I'm convinced that all but one is original to the rig. The final digit of serial is a 1; one is a 5. The 1 is a bit of a head scratcher because a 2001 class c fleetwood rides on a 2000 chassis and this was the changeover year for DOT numbering. I'm not convinced that these are brand new 2011 tires, yet the 1 also doesn't make sense unless the rolling chassis (chevy) had no wheels and Fleetwood changed them. They should be "0" if original. Heading on a trip to Yellowstone and this thread provides the material with the wife on why to replace them regardless.

Here is a useful link that talks about the tire serial (dot) Tire Tech Information - Determining the Age of a Tire
The thing they don't spell out that is helpful is that tires MFG after 2000 use 4 number in the date, previous there was only 3 number. So take another look at your tires and if the date code is 3 numbers they are pre 2000 and over 11 years old at the very best.
__________________

__________________
Mochisme "Ted"
2000 34' La Palma
2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee (Toad)
Mochisme is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Repair or replace flat tire? littlec Newmar Owner's Forum 11 11-23-2011 09:42 PM
Bad tire extender TXredfish Class A Motorhome Discussions 6 11-22-2011 07:18 AM
Tire Cover for 22.5" tires Benny367 Class A Motorhome Discussions 7 09-30-2011 04:47 PM
Same Tire - replaced 3 times Semiretired Travel Trailer Discussion 10 09-18-2011 01:01 PM
Tire Discussion and Failures RJay iRV2.com General Discussion 2 06-30-2011 09:04 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.