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Old 08-07-2011, 01:07 PM   #1
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tire pressure

What would the tire pressure be for a 36 ft monaco tire size 235/80 r22.5 xrv. Thank you for your help.
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Old 08-07-2011, 01:18 PM   #2
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I would look at your owners manual or door sticker.
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Old 08-07-2011, 02:41 PM   #3
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Micki49,

You need to know the loaded weight of your coach, by tire position if possible, but certinly by axle weight.
Then go to the tire chart published by the tire manufacturer and determine the PSI per tire. Always use the weight of the heavest side per axle in determining pressure.

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Old 08-07-2011, 03:13 PM   #4
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There are more arguments about this, than any other question on the forum. It is a good idea to get you coach weighted if you think you are close to gross weight. However, If you look on the weight label by the drivers seat. You will find the air pressure listed for your size tires. You will note it says the pressure for the front axel at max weight. And the rear axel at max weight. Don't let some tell you that it is empty, half full, wet weight etc. That is incorrect. It clearly states at max weight.
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:39 PM   #5
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Weight is the primary criteria. If you know you are close to, but under the max sticker weight, go by the sticker pressure as long as you haven't changed tire sizes.

Look at the stickers to see what your CCC (cargo carrying capacity) is. Here is the definition used by MFRs :

CCC (Cargo Carrying Capacity), used Sept 2000 – present, means GVWR minus the following: UVW (Unloaded vehicle weight), full fresh (potable) water weight (including that for the water heater) full LP gas weight, and SCWR (weight of persons based on sleeping capacity). Note: Remember that optional accessories or equipment not included in the UVW will take up part of the Cargo Carrying Capacity.

GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) means the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded vehicle, including liquids, passengers, cargo and the tongue weight of any towed vehicle. Note: The tow vehicle and RV each have a GVWR.

SCWR (Sleeping Capacity Weight Rating) is the manufacturer–designated number of sleeping positions multiplied by 154 lbs (70 kgs).

Example of Cargo Carrying Capacity computation on a Motorhome Vehicle Weight Information plate:
GVWR 22,000 lbs.
Less UVW - 16,000 lbs.
Less 20 Gallons Fresh Water x 8.3 lbs. Each - 166 lbs.
Less 16 Gallons Propane x 4.5 lbs. Each - 72 lbs.
Less SCWR (4 x 154 lbs.) - 616 lbs.
Cargo Carrying Capacity (CCC) - 5,146 lbs.

Estimate the weight of all stuff you load in all storage compartments including food and clothes and how much tongue weight you have on your hitch if any. If it is way less than your CCC, you may be able to run less pressure in your tires than you would at maximum weight. If, on the other hand you have a coach that doesn't have much CCC, you might as well run at max sticker pressure. But you need to be careful not to overload your coach. Yes you "should" weigh your coach, but a lot of folks simply don't, so this is a way to know about where you stand.

http://www.your-rv-lifestyle.com/vehicle-weight.html
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Old 08-07-2011, 05:35 PM   #6
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I just got this Monaco and I can not find the weight label. My Pace Arrow had it by the drivers seat. I have looked every were and can't find it and it is not in any of the manuals that came with it.
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Old 08-07-2011, 06:02 PM   #7
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Having had three blowouts on my right rear inner with the same tire you have on your rig, I now inflate my rear axle to the Max. cold pressure stated on the sidewall of the tire- 110 psi.

Yes, I've had all positions weighed and both axle totals. I didn't design or build this rig with a bedroom slide, batteries, 7000 watt generator, Washer/drier (or a large storage area) and a holding tank over the right rear- I just bought it that way. Since I've inflated that axle to the max. cold presure Michelin allows, no more problems (2 years now).

Good luck on your choice of figures to use,
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Old 08-07-2011, 06:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Hubrich View Post
Having had three blowouts on my right rear inner with the same tire you have on your rig, I now inflate my rear axle to the Max. cold pressure stated on the sidewall of the tire- 110 psi.

Yes, I've had all positions weighed and both axle totals. I didn't design or build this rig with a bedroom slide, batteries, 7000 watt generator and a holding tank over the right rear- I just bought it that way. Since I've inflated that axle to the max. cold presure Michelin allows, no more problems (2 years now).

Good luck on your choice of figures to use,
The pressure you say is the "max cold pressure" is NOT the maximum pressure an RV (truck) tire should ever have. It is the MINIMUM pressure to support the maximum rating of the tire. This is stated in the Michelin, Toyo and GoodYear tire guides as well as has been in Motorhome magazine.
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Old 08-07-2011, 06:11 PM   #9
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Since you can't find the manufacturer sticker you can (like the above poster said) go with the max cold figure that is on the sidewall of the tire for now.

You might give up a little ride but safe.
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Old 08-07-2011, 08:31 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ7ole
Weight is the primary criteria. If you know you are close to, but under the max sticker weight, go by the sticker pressure as long as you haven't changed tire sizes.

Look at the stickers to see what your CCC (cargo carrying capacity) is. Here is the definition used by MFRs :

CCC (Cargo Carrying Capacity), used Sept 2000 – present, means GVWR minus the following: UVW (Unloaded vehicle weight), full fresh (potable) water weight (including that for the water heater) full LP gas weight, and SCWR (weight of persons based on sleeping capacity). Note: Remember that optional accessories or equipment not included in the UVW will take up part of the Cargo Carrying Capacity.

GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) means the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded vehicle, including liquids, passengers, cargo and the tongue weight of any towed vehicle. Note: The tow vehicle and RV each have a GVWR.

SCWR (Sleeping Capacity Weight Rating) is the manufacturer–designated number of sleeping positions multiplied by 154 lbs (70 kgs).

Example of Cargo Carrying Capacity computation on a Motorhome Vehicle Weight Information plate:
GVWR 22,000 lbs.
Less UVW - 16,000 lbs.
Less 20 Gallons Fresh Water x 8.3 lbs. Each - 166 lbs.
Less 16 Gallons Propane x 4.5 lbs. Each - 72 lbs.
Less SCWR (4 x 154 lbs.) - 616 lbs.
Cargo Carrying Capacity (CCC) - 5,146 lbs.

Estimate the weight of all stuff you load in all storage compartments including food and clothes and how much tongue weight you have on your hitch if any. If it is way less than your CCC, you may be able to run nfoless pressure in your tires than you would at maximum weight. If, on the other hand you have a coach that doesn't have much CCC, you might as well run at max sticker pressure. But you need to be careful the not to overload your coach. Yes you "should" weigh your coach, but a lot of folks simply don't, so this is a way to know about where you stand.

http://www.your-rv-lifestyle.com/vehicle-weight.html
Excellent post. Thanks for the info.
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Old 08-08-2011, 07:58 AM   #11
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Another source of information is RV Safety & Education Foundation ( rvsafety.com ). I have talked to them at the Hershey RV shows. They have a schedule of where they are during the year and will weigh your rig also.
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Old 08-08-2011, 09:46 AM   #12
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If you have not weighed do so---we have similar rigs and I am always suprised at how much weight I get over my rear axels-----we probably weigh a similar amount and we do have the same tire. My weight lable (in an upper cabinet above the drivers seat) calls for 80#'s which I quickly determined to be silly----I run 100#'s (on the sidewall) my tires are 1002 DOT and will be replaced this year without having any problems---
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Old 08-08-2011, 05:06 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_D View Post
The pressure you say is the "max cold pressure" is NOT the maximum pressure an RV (truck) tire should ever have. It is the MINIMUM pressure to support the maximum rating of the tire. This is stated in the Michelin, Toyo and GoodYear tire guides as well as has been in Motorhome magazine.
You seem to be saying that the tires can be inflated to a pressure higher than the sidewall pressure. This did not seem correct to me, so I went to the Goodyear site and found this:

"Proper inflation is the single most important part of tire care. The inflation pressure on the side of the tire is the MAXIMUM operating pressure. It is not necessarily the right inflation for your vehicle. Always use the inflation recommended by the vehicle manufacturer. You can find it in your owner's manual, posted on the edge of the driver's door, on a door post or on the inside of the glovebox door. Always check inflation when tires are COLD: when the vehicle has been driven less than a mile or one hour or more after driving. Use a good quality tire gauge. Note: It's natural for radial tires to have a slight bulge in the sidewall at their proper inflation pressure. Check or adjust inflation every few weeks, before any long trip or if traveling with a heavy load. And don't forget to check the spare. Your Goodyear retailer can answer any questions you may have about tire inflation."

Another case of internet misinformation unless I am misunderstanding what you are saying. Ok, my tires say Maximum load xxxx pounds at yy MAX pressure. So how much more can I add, just to be safe, before they explode. That is why they say MAX pressure (cold).
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Old 08-17-2011, 12:58 PM   #14
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You shouldn't trust the pressure posted on the sticker in the motorhome. I have a 2008 Southwind and the psi posted is 95 front and 90 rear. I went to the Michelin site and the maximum for these tires/weight (at gross weight of 22,000 lbs) is 85 psi. I have no idea where the 95 and 90 come from unless they are using different brand tires for the calculation. I've weighed the coach fully loaded and we run about 21,000 so Michelin recommends about 80 psi (heaviest weight on each axle) which is what I use. I also noticed better handling when I lowered the pressure. I have 20,000 miles on it and the tires are wearing properly.
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