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Old 04-21-2015, 02:05 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Basically if you use a large RV you should have metal valves. or if you run an external TPMS you should have metal valves. BUT there are fitment issues that must be considered as not all valves will fit all wheels.
I have metal valves on my MH tires and I inquired at the Honda dealer about replacing the rubber stems on my 2014 CR-V with metal ones. I knew that Honda doesn't have dedicated TPMS sensors in the wheels so I figured that it wouldn't be a problem. Unfortunately, although the wheels don't have TPMS sensors the stems are integrated with wheel rotation sensors that are part of the ABS systems (which is also used to derive tire diameter and, hence, pressure--it's a lousy TPMS system as any Honda owner can tell you). Anyway, the long and the short of it is that there's no way to get metal stems and I'll have to live with the rubber ones.
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:45 PM   #44
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PressurePro here

I have not installed the the system yet. I have read these previous comments quite carefully and have the following observation. The transmitter caps, regardless of the system are quite bulky and have some mass (at least 1 ounce) to them. When the wheel is spinning (65-70 mph) the forces exerted on a rubber valve stem with a TPMS transmitter cap installed are significant. These forces could easily result in a premature valve stem failure of some sort. It is obvious that a metal valve stem is going to be a more robust system.
On dual wheels when adding a TPMS cap and an air hose extension system is used. The approach has to be planned very carefully in order for the mass of the caps/extension hose system to balance each other off and the wheel keep the wheel in balance. Wire braided extension hoses (if used) must be secured in some fashion to prevent them from being flexed by the centrifugal forces (See attached Photo). Extension hoses should never be used on rubber valve stems.
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:56 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by Woofer-01 View Post
On dual wheels when adding a TPMS cap and an air hose extension system is used. The approach has to be planned very carefully in order for the mass of the caps/extension hose system to balance each other off and the wheel keep the wheel in balance. Wire braided extension hoses (if used) must be secured in some fashion to prevent them from being flexed by the centrifugal forces (See attached Photo). Extension hoses should never be used on rubber valve stems.
Most people don't even balance their duals and IMO the weight of the wheel and tire assembly is so much more than that of any extension or hose, I can't see how that possibly matters. My Crossfire Equalizers are mounted on the decorative axle covers and haven't even created enough stress to deform the thin metal they are attached to. The fractional ounce balancing we're used to on the 4-wheel independent suspension of an automobile isn't in play here.
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Old 04-21-2015, 07:25 PM   #46
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Another vote for EEZ products. Purchased 10 wheel system for RV & Toad. EEZ has easiest to read display of any I shopped. Great customer service if needed
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Old 04-21-2015, 10:50 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woofer-01 View Post
I have not installed the the system yet. I have read these previous comments quite carefully and have the following observation. The transmitter caps, regardless of the system are quite bulky and have some mass (at least 1 ounce) to them. When the wheel is spinning (65-70 mph) the forces exerted on a rubber valve stem with a TPMS transmitter cap installed are significant. These forces could easily result in a premature valve stem failure of some sort. It is obvious that a metal valve stem is going to be a more robust system.
On dual wheels when adding a TPMS cap and an air hose extension system is used. The approach has to be planned very carefully in order for the mass of the caps/extension hose system to balance each other off and the wheel keep the wheel in balance. Wire braided extension hoses (if used) must be secured in some fashion to prevent them from being flexed by the centrifugal forces (See attached Photo). Extension hoses should never be used on rubber valve stems.
well you might think so but your assumptions are the same ones I made originally ,the caps have no effect on the balance regardless of the type of stem, I have logged 25,000 miles by 4 tires so 100000 miles of rubber stems with sensors on them without a problem, car rear tires, dolly tires, car hauler tandem trailers, not a hint of problem, even driven the car with sensors still on at highway speed, no vibrations or issues, As far as the coach goes, the position of the sensors and braided line will have zero measurable impact on the coach regardless of location, the braided stainless extensions are rigid on their own and are not effect by the relatively slow rotation of 22.5 tires in my case. I have never seen rubber stems on a 22.5 rim, ever.

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Old 04-21-2015, 10:56 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
From my 1/23/13 post on Valves
"For passenger and light truck wheels that use the standard "snap-in" rubber valves, you will usually find them to be either 0.445 to 0.461" or 0.618 to 0.633" dia hole. There is also a maximum metal thickness of 0.156" at the hole. Some aluminum wheels have special step machining to cut the thickness down to the proper dimension. Most steel wheels do not have this problem as they are thinner than 0.156" and run closer to 0.070". These "snap-in" have a 65 psi max spec and carry part numbers such as TR412, 413, 414, 418, 423 and the large dia. TR415 & 425. The difference is the total length which runs from 0.88 to 2.00 outside the rim surface.
Note. some have chrome covers but are still basically the same rubber valve under the thin cover. Do not be mislead into thinking these chrome valves are like the bolt in metal valves. Look for the TR number."

There is more if you want to learn.

Basically if you use a large RV you should have metal valves. or if you run an external TPMS you should have metal valves. BUT there are fitment issues that must be considered as not all valves will fit all wheels.

Totally agree with the comment larger RV's should have metal bolt in's mainly as a result of the pressures involved and the likely length of the inner duel stems, as far as tpms sensors, I wouldn't spend the money on trailer's, cars and dolly's I have 1000's of miles on rubber stems with sensors with no issues.

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Old 04-21-2015, 11:12 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by ShapeShifter View Post
As always, there is no single answer to cover all conditions. My statement was in response to the statement that external TPMS have a tendency to leak and cause blowouts. That generally is much more of an issue with rubber valve stems, and not rigid metal stems.

I'm glad you've had good luck with rubber valve stems, but your luck is not universal. While I don't necessarily recommend everyone immediately replace all of their valve stems, I do advocate that everyone be aware of the potential situation and be on the lookout for it. Yes, metal valve stems are not an absolute requirement, but they have advantages.

While on the road, I had a flat tire on my toad (it was fine while traveling, but the next morning in camp it was flat.) It turned out to be a leaking rubber valve stem. I had it replaced with a new rubber valve stem. Some time later that same year, at home, another toad tire went flat: it was also a leaking rubber valve stem. I never had a leaking valve stem in 40 years before that, and once I started using external TPMS sensors I had two during the second year. Once is a fluke, twice is the beginning of a trend. At that point I had all of the rubber valve stems replaced with bolt-in metal stems. At my local shop around the corner it was $6 per stem, installed: $24 total, including re-balancing and taking the wheels on/off the toad. Hardly breaking the bank, it was good peace of mind: I never had a tire stem problem in the seven years since then.

Of course, everyone's experiences will be different.
Where do you get your information that rubber stems generally are more responsible for blow outs or leaks?

I have not had luck, I run 12 tires all with tpms sensors, for over 25,000 miles each or over 250,000 combined miles without a sensor or stem failure, the coach admittedly has steel stems but the car/dolly or car hauler all have standard pull through rubber stems, never a problem, and I have to say the majority of conversations I have with similarly equipped coach owners have yielded the same opinion as mine.

24 bucks for 4 tires re and re, metal stems installed and balancing is an absolute steal, that would never happened here, maybe one tire for $24.00.

Your experience could just as easily be mishandling or improper installation of the tpms sensors or even ill fitting sensors which would also occur with steel stems,

My point is blanket statements to people looking for advise should be prefaced as opinions and not facts, they can then draw their own conclusions.

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Old 04-22-2015, 06:21 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by jerichorick View Post
I bought the tst 507RV. I have been having problems getting it to work correctly. If you have one of those weather stations, as I do, the outdoor sensor transmits on the same frequency as the 507 sensors. Pulling the battery from the weather transmitter helps to let the monitor find the sensors. Once everything is up and running for the tpms the weather station can be reprogrammed.

Another common problem with the monitor is the battery charge jack and/or the antenna connector can separate from the circuit board.

The folks at TST have been working very diligently to satisfy me and get my equipment up and running properly. They are actively seeking to correct the monitor circuit board issues.

Now that I have the system working, as of this morning, I am hoping things will stay working so I can report on the performance.

In truth I strongly feel that I just happened to get the one in a bunch bad unit. I am standing by TST and the 507RV system with the pass through sensors. When installing the sensors it is important to get them well seated on the valve stem. Also, tag and sync the sensors before you install them.

Hope my experiences don't turn you off from this system. There are far more success stories with TST than my one problem system.

Happy trails,
Rick Y
don't think you can tag and sync them unless they are installed, from what I understand they do not activate until air pressure is introduced. I personally have had tst systems for the past 6 years with minor issues mostly operator caused, I can say that their customer service is second to non and Mike and his crew will go out of their way to ensure safety and comfort for their customers without question.

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Old 04-22-2015, 08:28 AM   #51
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Very good thread. Not your typical I bought because of the price point. Plenty of real good information. I'm addressing the rubber stem combined with TPMS. Per research on this forum when I purchased a TPMS system I went the lowest price direction as members said "no problem." Not mentioning any brand as others have them and seem to receive good service. I did not, consequently purchased TST. Mike and his crew suggested the flow thru for our bus and the 507 caps for the toad, 08 Ford Edge with rubber stems. Ongoing for over three years their have been zero issues with the caps and rubber stems. We frequently drive the toad on I 95 to visit our son and daughter from our base camp at 1 1/2 hour to 4 1/2 hour one way interstate speeds. Never an issue, nada! The TST 507 caps are extremely light weight and low profile. To further elaborate on the bus I did have issues with several senors not working correctly which were replaced quickly and my only expense was $2.50 for postage to return the defective ones for examination. Second and most perplexing situation were inner duals NOT signaling but intermittently. Different valve extensions were purchased with no luck. At the Myrtle Beach Rally last September Mike from TST solved the issue. It was so simple. He simple reached behind the inside dually removed the valve stem extensions and attached the sensors. Works perfectly and the thumb hole allows the air chuck to operate with no problems. I might add Mike crawled under the bus and installed with a broken hand in a cast. Good service?
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:00 AM   #52
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I'm actually thinking of buying a second TPMS monitor and installing it in the toad full-time. My toad is a 2014 Honda CR-V which has what I consider to be a useless TPMS system which uses the ABS system to detect minute changes in wheel diameter caused by loss of pressure. The system is prone to false alarms and can't tell you which wheel is low. It is the most disliked feature on the 2014 CR-V (previous models had a different system).

If TST will sell me a second monitor I will install it in the CR-V permanently so I can ignore the factory system altogether. I could take the monitor out of the MH but then it would beep continuously because it would fail to get signals from the MH's sensors. I would hate to have to reprogram it every time I switched it back and forth. There is a way to get it to ignore the toad's sensors when it is away from the MH but I don't think the reverse is possible.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:22 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
Where do you get your information that rubber stems generally are more responsible for blow outs or leaks?
From anecdotal stories, from personal experience, and from TPMS manufacturers. For example:

TireTracker TPMS FAQ:
Quote:
10. Are metal valve stems required with the TireTraker™ TT400C TPMS?
The TireTraker™ TT400C TPMS sensors weigh only 0.4 ounces (without battery) and do not require metal valve stems. However, we always recommend metal stems be installed whether you have a TPMS or not.
TST TPMS FAQ:
Quote:
Do I need special valve stems?
No, you do not need special valve stems, but you do need commonly available metal valve stems.

The added weight of the sensor on a rubber valve stem could cause problems that will be avoided by using metal valve stems.

Most motorhomes and commercial transport vehicles come equipped with metal valve stems. If you do need metal valve stems, they are not expensive; a recent customer had 6 valve stems replaced on a 30’ gooseneck racing trailer for $36. They are available and can be quickly installed by any tire dealer.
Quote:
but the car/dolly or car hauler all have standard pull through rubber stems, never a problem
I'm glad rubber valve stems work for you and your friends. However, a lack of something occurring doesn't mean it can't occur. I've never had a refrigerator fire, but it does happen. I've never had a battery blow up, but it does happen. But I have had rubber valve stems fail with TPMS sensors installed, and never had one fail before installing them. While it's true that correlation does not prove cause, it seems fairly convincing to me, at least enough to invest in some metal valve stems.

Quote:
24 bucks for 4 tires re and re, metal stems installed and balancing is an absolute steal, that would never happened here, maybe one tire for $24.00.
Go back and look at the quoted FAQ from TST. The referenced customer paid exactly the same price per wheel as I did. Perhaps my deal wasn't all that special?

Quote:
Your experience could just as easily be mishandling or improper installation of the tpms sensors or even ill fitting sensors which would also occur with steel stems,
They were installed according to the manufacturer's specs. How exactly would improper installation of the sensors cause cracking of the rubber valve stem where the stem meets the flared portion that inserts into the wheel? (The part the flexes when you try to manually move the valve stem.) And how would a metal valve stem have the same failure, when there isn't any rubber in that area that is prone to flexing, or any flex in that area?

Quote:
My point is blanket statements to people looking for advise should be prefaced as opinions and not facts, they can then draw their own conclusions.
Agreed, such statements should be labeled as opinion. And yet you make a blanket statement yourself without stating it is your personal opinion:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
switching to bolt on metal stems is over kill, the manufactures do not insist or recommend that stems be upgraded, if you were getting new tires and not creating any expense why not, but to remove tires, partially dismount tires to install bolt on metal stems, don't waste your money.
Sounds like a pretty strongly worded blanket statement to me.

PS: Go back and read the FAQ from TST: they do indeed recommend metal valve stems, so the premise of your blanket statement is false.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:25 AM   #54
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Just weighed four sensors (TireTraker brand) including batteries (to get good representative reading.

I get 1.75 OZ or rounding up 0.44 oz each

Facts are my friend. :-)\

RE hose extenders.
I have 25k milrs on this set-up with zero problems.


NOTE my external TPM sensors are not in this picture but my internal ones are in place.

I prefer a solid bolt down of the hose end to rubber donuts in the hand holes.



Comment on Rubber valves and bolt in valves.
With either valve you should always replace the rubber components when you get new tires. We all know rubber "ages" and valve stems and rubber gaskets are no exception.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:42 AM   #55
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Originally Posted by jerichorick View Post
I bought the tst 507RV. I have been having problems getting it to work correctly. If you have one of those weather stations, as I do, the outdoor sensor transmits on the same frequency as the 507 sensors. Pulling the battery from the weather transmitter helps to let the monitor find the sensors. Once everything is up and running for the tpms the weather station can be reprogrammed.

snip
,
Rick Y
RE transmitter interference. I have an internal system from HELLA and I once tried a wireless backup camera but it created interference with the HELLS TPM. So this may be isolated but it does occur.
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Old 04-22-2015, 11:12 AM   #56
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I'm actually thinking of buying a second TPMS monitor and installing it in the toad full-time. My toad is a 2014 Honda CR-V which has what I consider to be a useless TPMS system which uses the ABS system to detect minute changes in wheel diameter caused by loss of pressure. The system is prone to false alarms and can't tell you which wheel is low. It is the most disliked feature on the 2014 CR-V (previous models had a different system).

If TST will sell me a second monitor I will install it in the CR-V permanently so I can ignore the factory system altogether. I could take the monitor out of the MH but then it would beep continuously because it would fail to get signals from the MH's sensors. I would hate to have to reprogram it every time I switched it back and forth. There is a way to get it to ignore the toad's sensors when it is away from the MH but I don't think the reverse is possible.
After posting this I decided to call TST. They will sell a monitor alone for $59 and Mike confirmed that there is nothing wrong with what I'm proposing. Mike says he gets lots of complaints from people about how poor their car TPMS systems are.
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