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Old 04-22-2015, 11:19 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
NOTE my external TPM sensors are not in this picture but my internal ones are in place.
The sensor weight should not be an issue with dual tires -- if they are installed properly, the valve stems of the two tires should be 180 degrees apart from each other. The weight of the two sensors will tend to cancel each other out, and only the difference of the two sensor weights will contribute to any out of balance condition, and that should be totally negligible compared to the mass of two large tires and wheels.

Even on single tires (toads and MH fronts or tags) the weight doesn't seem to be an issue. On my toads, I could tell no difference between having the sensors on or off - I would install them during camping season, and remove them over the winter, and I never rebalanced the tires for the sensors and never felt any kind of balance induced vibration. Of course, someone else's results might be different: I suppose if you have a very lightly sprung suspension and very small and light wheels/tires, the extra sensor weight might make a slight difference.) That being said, it seems very few people (if any) re-balance their tires after adding external pressure sensors, and I can't say that I've seen any reports of balance problems after adding a sensor.

I think it's safe to say (Moxy take note, this is a personal opinion!) that it's not generally necessary to balance the tires after adding sensors. But if it makes you feel better, then go ahead and balance your tires with them in place.
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Old 04-22-2015, 02:36 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShapeShifter View Post
From anecdotal stories, from personal experience, and from TPMS manufacturers. For example:

TireTracker TPMS FAQ:


TST TPMS FAQ:


I'm glad rubber valve stems work for you and your friends. However, a lack of something occurring doesn't mean it can't occur. I've never had a refrigerator fire, but it does happen. I've never had a battery blow up, but it does happen. But I have had rubber valve stems fail with TPMS sensors installed, and never had one fail before installing them. While it's true that correlation does not prove cause, it seems fairly convincing to me, at least enough to invest in some metal valve stems.


Go back and look at the quoted FAQ from TST. The referenced customer paid exactly the same price per wheel as I did. Perhaps my deal wasn't all that special?


They were installed according to the manufacturer's specs. How exactly would improper installation of the sensors cause cracking of the rubber valve stem where the stem meets the flared portion that inserts into the wheel? (The part the flexes when you try to manually move the valve stem.) And how would a metal valve stem have the same failure, when there isn't any rubber in that area that is prone to flexing, or any flex in that area?


Agreed, such statements should be labeled as opinion. And yet you make a blanket statement yourself without stating it is your personal opinion:



Sounds like a pretty strongly worded blanket statement to me.

PS: Go back and read the FAQ from TST: they do indeed recommend metal valve stems, so the premise of your blanket statement is false.
your comments and responses are noted and I will add the following,

a) personal experience does not a trend make, something happening twice is not a trend, if it did we would never leave the house or fly in a plane, do you have a fridge and batteries in your coach?

b)$24.00 for re and re of 4 tires, rebalance 4 tires, replace four rubber stems with metal bolt on's is a deal trust me, I have paid for enough tires and balancing to know that but I cant believe I actually debating this one,

c) I don't recall you indicating the stems were cracked, you first indicated slow leaks while parked, if they were they clearly needed replacing as they were old and dried out, 1/2 oz sensor didn't crack your stems unless they were faulty to start.

There are those who would walk a mile rather than drive to reduce the danger of getting in a car accident, there are those who wont fly regardless of the distance they need to go , I guess there are some who wont use a fridge cause they catch on fire according to your comments, are there fears real, yes, are they reasonable, not likely.

I have spoke directly to TST numerous times, I'm not worried

People reading this thread can and have got a balanced approach based on peoples experience and then drawn their own conclusions from our opinions, Some like yourself have made comments that rubber stems are the cause of more leaks and blowouts than metal and that information is misleading and you have nothing but gossip to back up your claim.

Of coarse what I post is my opinion, you comment doesn't make any sense, what I don't do is rely on anything other than my experience or make claims when I don't know what I'm talking about,

Bottom line is sensors haven't effected balance on any of my tires over a substantial amount of miles, rubber valve stems on a third of my tires have performed fine with sensors attached at highway speed through all kinds of conditions without fail, those are my facts and real world conditions, no excuses and my observations have been echoed by others in this thread and numerous other threads on the topic, Readers can draw their own conclusions.

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Old 04-22-2015, 03:58 PM   #59
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We use the Tire Tracker TT-400C monitoring system. Has 10 sensors, so we get the toad too. It's been easy to use and monitors both pressure and temperature. tiretracker.com Good luck with your search
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:17 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
People reading this thread can and have got a balanced approach based on peoples experience and then drawn their own conclusions from our opinions
Precisely. Give information, and let people make their own decisions. We've both presented two sides to the same story. Now, you've made your decision (you're not alone in it) and I've made mine (and I'm not alone.) It is unlikely that either of us will convince the other to change their mind.

Quote:
Some like yourself have made comments that rubber stems are the cause of more leaks and blowouts than metal and that information is misleading and you have nothing but gossip to back up your claim.
No, I have my experiences, the experiences of others, and the statements by TPMS manufacturers to back up my claims. But you don't believe any of them, and there's nothing I can say to change your mind. That's OK, because I don't believe that rubber valve stems are 100% reliable, and there's nothing you can say to change my mind. Others will believe what they want, and that's OK too.

You appear to be claiming that I am making this up and therefore intentionally misleading others. I am not. By dismissing my opinions, the opinions of others, and the recommendations of TPMS manufacturers, you are being misleading in the opposite direction.

I'm glad you have not had any problems with rubber valve stems. But that doesn't mean it can't happen, just as using a TPMS sensor on a rubber valve stem doesn't mean you will always have problems. It's a grey area, and people will have to make their own decisions.
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:22 AM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bstreitz View Post
We use the Tire Tracker TT-400C monitoring system. Has 10 sensors, so we get the toad too. It's been easy to use and monitors both pressure and temperature. tiretracker.com Good luck with your search
This does not appear to be the correct link. This looks like a domain parking site with a bunch of generic search links, and not a product specific web site. This is a common Internet technique: find a commonly used URL, and grab the domains that sound like it and have common misspellings, then place your own advertising on those sites hoping to catch an unwary surfer.


I believe this is the site you want: https://www.tiretraker.com/ (Note that it does not have a 'c' in Tracker.)
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:35 AM   #62
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Personally, I didn't like the flow-through sensors and just swapped them for the traditional type. For my >100psi tires I found the flow rate to be frustratingly slow.
Can anybody else share their experiences and thoughts on this statement?

I like the looks of the EEZ TPMS, mostly due to the appearance of the monitor and certain operational features. I like the idea, if I can get it, of a 10 sensor system with 4 flow through sensors and 6 valve cap sensors. I would mount the flow through sensors on the rear dual valve stems themselves, and then attach the braided extensions on top of them. I would use the valve cap sensors on the fronts and the toad, none of which have extensions.

The appeal is that I would not need to remove the sensors from the rear wheels when topping off tires (especially from my passenger side outer which is topped off often due to a slow leak that loses a couple PSI per month.) A minor convenience, but not worth it if it is a significant restriction to the fill rate.

Background: I have a high pressure high volume (175 PSI, 5HP, 80 gallon) shop compressor with a high flow chuck. So I get some reasonably snappy fill rates. (When I had a little 120 PSI portable, the fill rate was always lousy, so a restriction wouldn't make much difference.)

So, opinions please: will I be happy with flow-through sensors, or should I stick will all conventional valve cap sensors?
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Old 04-23-2015, 10:14 AM   #63
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I have flow tru TST sensors and a 150 psi pancake compressor. No troubles at all. But I only need to top off about 2x a year, so no big deal either way
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Old 04-23-2015, 01:54 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShapeShifter View Post
Can anybody else share their experiences and thoughts on this statement?

I like the looks of the EEZ TPMS, mostly due to the appearance of the monitor and certain operational features. I like the idea, if I can get it, of a 10 sensor system with 4 flow through sensors and 6 valve cap sensors. I would mount the flow through sensors on the rear dual valve stems themselves, and then attach the braided extensions on top of them. I would use the valve cap sensors on the fronts and the toad, none of which have extensions.

The appeal is that I would not need to remove the sensors from the rear wheels when topping off tires (especially from my passenger side outer which is topped off often due to a slow leak that loses a couple PSI per month.) A minor convenience, but not worth it if it is a significant restriction to the fill rate.

Background: I have a high pressure high volume (175 PSI, 5HP, 80 gallon) shop compressor with a high flow chuck. So I get some reasonably snappy fill rates. (When I had a little 120 PSI portable, the fill rate was always lousy, so a restriction wouldn't make much difference.)

So, opinions please: will I be happy with flow-through sensors, or should I stick will all conventional valve cap sensors?
Can't comment on "appearance" of display as that obvious is a personal preference.

Also not sure of the need and expense for high flow rate air line. Once tires are properly inflated i would be surprised if you need to add much more than 3 to 5 psi at the most in any given month and more likely will only need 1 or 2 psi. If you need to add 10 psi something is wrong AND that means you might be operating with the tire low on air depending on the margin you plan on between the MIN pressure needed to carry the load and the CIP.
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:51 PM   #65
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Agreed that the top off pressure change is usually only a few PSI, worst case is late in the camping season when temperatures drop precipitously, and so do tire pressures. While that's still only a few PSI, with the size of the tires (times 6 tires) it's still more than a couple minutes crouched down by the tires. I guess that my question really boils down to whether the flow through sensors significantly slows down the fill rate, as was alluded to by another poster?

The time it takes me to top off tires now is much less than it was when I had a smaller compressor and low quality air chuck - now that I'm spoiled, I would hate to take a step back!
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Old 04-23-2015, 05:27 PM   #66
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I guess that my question really boils down to whether the flow through sensors significantly slows down the fill rate, as was alluded to by another poster?
I have already accepted the fact the the low flow rate I was experiencing was probably due to the 130psi limitation of my compressor. But since the compressor is a nice oil-filled Hitachi, I'd rather keep it and use the regular stems. Removing the flow through sensors using the tiny Allen key that is required was a lot more of a pain than removing the regular sensors IMO.
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Old 04-23-2015, 05:49 PM   #67
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Removing the flow through sensors using the tiny Allen key that is required
Do you have to use the Allen key? I assume it's just to make them tamper resistant - I have no worries about someone stealing them.
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:26 PM   #68
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Do you have to use the Allen key? I assume it's just to make them tamper resistant - I have no worries about someone stealing them.
If I have to take them off to fill them (since my compressor doesn't have a high enough max psi) then I'd rather have the theft-protection even if I don't expect anyone to steal them. I really don't care what you do; I made the decision that I wanted to go back to the regular style. Works for me; that's all I care about.
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Old 04-24-2015, 05:55 AM   #69
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So in summary...
The manufactuers suggest using Metal Valve Stems, but the owner should change the rubber seals on them every 6-10 years.
Rubber Valve stems can be used, as some of the members report no problems.
Re balancing wheels after installing a TPMS is not neccessary since the larger MASS of the tire-wheel combinations on RVs negate the any small variations.

So there we have it!
Can everyone shake hands now?
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Old 04-24-2015, 07:08 AM   #70
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This has nothing to do with rubber stems or metal stems......

Has anyone else seen this system - "Wasp" on ebay? It appears to be nearly identical to the EEZ TPMS. Only the name is changed. One other think I really like is their 6 sensor system displays all tires simultaneously. That is the one thing I would like to see in a TPMS system, rather than one that scrolls through each tire one by one. They have other systems with various numbers and combinations of sensors as well, but they scroll through one by one.

I just thought it was interesting that this one is the same as the EEZ. Same Chinese factory selling their goods to someone else..

Gulf Stream Newmar Tiffin RV Motor Home Feed Through Sensors | eBay

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