Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-25-2014, 11:58 AM   #85
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMTTRANSPORT View Post
Here's how I roll every day with no worries if I am heavier on one than the other, If there is NOT an issue here there's defiantly not one on your Coach!
Nice looking rig. Looks well set up and appointed to carry the loads it was designed for. Likely the engine, tires, axles, etc were spec'd at the time of ordering. Probably heavy duty for equipment hauling rather than light or medium for freight.

Although you do not worry side to side I will bet you that you are hauling this unit less than 500 miles. Then you will unload and drive empty back to pick up the next piece of equipment. Would not pay to adjust ride height each time you loaded up. That is a matter of economics. Every minute you spend adjusting ride height or tire pressure is a minute you are not getting paid for. "If you aint turnin you aint earnin".

The buggy you are showing is probably fairly symmetrical. The ROPS and controls on the drivers side likely do not add a large amount of weight to one side and at that the weight is shared across two tandem axles. And the axle spacing on the rig is appropriate for the jurisdiction you haul in.

If you were hauling a large wheel loader (992K or 994H) the load would be virtually symmetrical.

I notice you have a jeep and a booster to even the load out so your axles are loaded appropriately. And the buggy is centered on the lowboy.

MH are different than the lowboy but you know that. Once the load is on the MH it will not change much from year to year. Yes the fuel and water levels change, the amount of food in the fridge changes as well as other small items. The rest of it is for the remainder of the coach life.

How much does the entire unit weigh with the buggy?
__________________

__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-25-2014, 01:13 PM   #86
Senior Member
 
DMTTRANSPORT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Henderson, Nevada
Posts: 1,225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
Nice looking rig. Looks well set up and appointed to carry the loads it was designed for. Likely the engine, tires, axles, etc were spec'd at the time of ordering. Probably heavy duty for equipment hauling rather than light or medium for freight.

Although you do not worry side to side I will bet you that you are hauling this unit less than 500 miles. Then you will unload and drive empty back to pick up the next piece of equipment. Would not pay to adjust ride height each time you loaded up. That is a matter of economics. Every minute you spend adjusting ride height or tire pressure is a minute you are not getting paid for. "If you aint turnin you aint earnin".

The buggy you are showing is probably fairly symmetrical. The ROPS and controls on the drivers side likely do not add a large amount of weight to one side and at that the weight is shared across two tandem axles. And the axle spacing on the rig is appropriate for the jurisdiction you haul in.

If you were hauling a large wheel loader (992K or 994H) the load would be virtually symmetrical.

I notice you have a jeep and a booster to even the load out so your axles are loaded appropriately. And the buggy is centered on the lowboy.

MH are different than the lowboy but you know that. Once the load is on the MH it will not change much from year to year. Yes the fuel and water levels change, the amount of food in the fridge changes as well as other small items. The rest of it is for the remainder of the coach life.

How much does the entire unit weigh with the buggy?
Actually this went from here in Las Vegas to northern Montana 1300+ routed miles, my point was that +/- weight is not an issue, when your Coach diesel tank is not full and your on a road with a crown the 9lbs per gallon weight is shifted adding weight to one side and removing weight from the other......total weight in the picture is only 172,000 +/-
__________________

__________________
2005 Newmar DS 4023, Spartan Chassis, ISL 370 Cumapart, 2008 Jeep Rubicon 4dr, 2015 Kia Soul, 1969 Italian & 2004 Akita
DMTTRANSPORT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 01:56 PM   #87
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMTTRANSPORT View Post
Actually this went from here in Las Vegas to northern Montana 1300+ routed miles, my point was that +/- weight is not an issue, when your Coach diesel tank is not full and your on a road with a crown the 9lbs per gallon weight is shifted adding weight to one side and removing weight from the other......total weight in the picture is only 172,000 +/-
I agree with your point on the load you are showing. What I find disconcerting on the MH example the tires on one side of one axle are carrying 10% of the gross of the unit more than the other side. That is on the scales and on the road the crown would increase the weight by another 2%.

Using your truck as an example that would mean the difference on one axle would be 17,200. Not realistic I realize but on a MH that is what is occurring. May be normal but it does not really seem right.
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 02:07 PM   #88
Senior Member
 
flynnwalter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Lake City, Florida
Posts: 450
DMTTransport
Not so, and I don't see the relationship between how the impressive things you do at work with completely different machinery shows how we do not need to know the weight our coach tires are carrying? It may be that the trailers you use are pretty much the same side-to-side in weight, but coaches may be much heavier at one corner (as is ours @ 2700lbs). It all depends upon where the coach builder chooses to place lots of heavy things such as batteries, w/d, fridge, hot water heater, propane tank, etc. If they are not balanced, the coach owner needs to know. There are work arounds, but you cannot 'know' without a four corner weighing. In our case the passenger rear duals were at/too near their max load rating--even at max psi--which we didn't know about until the four corner weighing. Without a four corner weighing the only method to figure psi would be dividing axle weight by four and consulting GY tire chart. But that would leave our heavier side seriously under inflated, which is the major cause for blow outs. I ignored all the four corner talk for a year, but my cousin just would not stop nagging me, and I got the weighing done to shut him up. I am glad I did so. I cannot explain it any better, and am done.
__________________
Frank W. '09 Cayman 38 SBD '08 CRV
Lake City, Florida
flynnwalter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 03:21 PM   #89
Senior Member
 
DMTTRANSPORT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Henderson, Nevada
Posts: 1,225
Quote:
Originally Posted by flynnwalter View Post
DMTTransport
Not so, and I don't see the relationship between how the impressive things you do at work with completely different machinery shows how we do not need to know the weight our coach tires are carrying? It may be that the trailers you use are pretty much the same side-to-side in weight, but coaches may be much heavier at one corner (as is ours @ 2700lbs). It all depends upon where the coach builder chooses to place lots of heavy things such as batteries, w/d, fridge, hot water heater, propane tank, etc. If they are not balanced, the coach owner needs to know. There are work arounds, but you cannot 'know' without a four corner weighing. In our case the passenger rear duals were at/too near their max load rating--even at max psi--which we didn't know about until the four corner weighing. Without a four corner weighing the only method to figure psi would be dividing axle weight by four and consulting GY tire chart. But that would leave our heavier side seriously under inflated, which is the major cause for blow outs. I ignored all the four corner talk for a year, but my cousin just would not stop nagging me, and I got the weighing done to shut him up. I am glad I did so. I cannot explain it any better, and am done.
Then the MFG is building an "unsafe" Vehicle....I never stated you didn't need know the weights, I am implying that the different weights on each corner are non issue, the chassis is designed to carry a "changing" max weight at all four corners like the Trailer, you can always add ballast to the kitty corner if it make you feel better....
__________________
2005 Newmar DS 4023, Spartan Chassis, ISL 370 Cumapart, 2008 Jeep Rubicon 4dr, 2015 Kia Soul, 1969 Italian & 2004 Akita
DMTTRANSPORT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 07:06 PM   #90
Senior Member
 
flynnwalter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Lake City, Florida
Posts: 450
DMT
Yes, we agree, of course MCC built an unsafe vehicle, and thats probably a part of the reason for them going bankrupt--because they knew what was coming with the RR4R chassis. But I did not know it until after a four corner weigh and more obvious was addition of the Source Ride Enhancement kit to stop the awful porpoising to underscore just how unsafe it had been. Do you not think other manufacturers build unsafe vehicles? Not sure about your claim of adding ballast, as I am not a mechanic or engineer and never heard of any RVer adding ballast. Perhaps I am not good at getting my point across. I believe our coach is now safe and handles okay, after our modifications--Source trailing arms & ride enhancement kit, 2 sizes larger tires to safely carry the weight at less psi to smooth the ride. But it was not safe with the 2700 lb heavier passenger rear corner as the OEM GY 255/70R22.5 tires were maxed out on weight and would be so even at max psi. Nobody would have put max psi in unless they knew about the much heavier side, as the entire axle weighs just under 16.3k lbs rated for 18k--so its 3700 lbs under gross axle weight rating. 4 corner weigh saved a possible disaster, so I don't understand your statement ..."Here's how I roll every day with no worries if I am heavier on one than the other, If there is NOT an issue here there's defiantly not one on your Coach! It (different weights on corners) so clearly was an 'issue' on our coach.
__________________
Frank W. '09 Cayman 38 SBD '08 CRV
Lake City, Florida
flynnwalter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 06:46 AM   #91
Senior Member
 
ru499's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Tuckerton, NJ
Posts: 153
Tire pressures

Seems like there are a lot of coaches out there that obviously have rubber too small for the job.
I guess that would be something to check before buying a new coach. You can't take anything for granted.
__________________
2005 Itasca Horizon 40FD
FMCA 428291
ru499 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 07:27 AM   #92
Senior Member
 
mytime's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Usually along the East Coast
Posts: 278
The tire issue is a problem, not only with MH's, also trailers and 5th wheels, all have gotten larger, heavier, some with the same axles and tires.
I personally wanted to know what I am riding on doing 70mph on a heavily traveled road. After weighing my rig, at each tire position, I was able to adjust tire pressure to improve the ride quality, also shifting some weight from the front axle by adjusting tag axle pressure.
I did it for my own personal benifit and it cost me less than a good steak dinner, and not nearly as stuffed.
__________________
mytime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 10:36 AM   #93
Senior Member
 
ru499's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Tuckerton, NJ
Posts: 153
My biggest pet peeve with the RV industry in general is they install the cheapest stuff they can find on RV's that we consumers pay premium prices for. When you invest over $250,000 on a vehicle, I really wouldn't care if it cost an extra five grand to have rugged, quality components installed.
__________________
2005 Itasca Horizon 40FD
FMCA 428291
ru499 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 11:36 AM   #94
Senior Member
 
DMTTRANSPORT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Henderson, Nevada
Posts: 1,225
Quote:
Originally Posted by ru499 View Post
My biggest pet peeve with the RV industry in general is they install the cheapest stuff they can find on RV's that we consumers pay premium prices for. When you invest over $250,000 on a vehicle, I really wouldn't care if it cost an extra five grand to have rugged, quality components installed.
__________________
2005 Newmar DS 4023, Spartan Chassis, ISL 370 Cumapart, 2008 Jeep Rubicon 4dr, 2015 Kia Soul, 1969 Italian & 2004 Akita
DMTTRANSPORT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 02:43 PM   #95
Senior Member
Commercial Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Akron, Ohio
Posts: 1,477
Sounds like a good policy / attitude. But untill people start walking away from the deal with all the "Bling" and demand better quality in their RV we won't see better quality in the showroom.

How is it possible for Korean manufacturers to offer 10/100,000 drivetrain and 3/36 or 5/50 on the rest of the car but the best most RV "Assemblers" (not manufacturers in my book) is 1/12,000 knowing full well that most warranty costs will fall on the owner.

I'm not gonna spend two days and drive 350 miles to have items fixed that should never have left the garage where the RV was assembled. What I will do is nevery buy that brand RV (Coachmen) again.
__________________
Retired Design & Quality Tire Eng. Read my tire blog RVTireSafety.NET to learn more about RV tires, valves & wheels. Read THIS post on why Tires Fail
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 02:49 PM   #96
Senior Member
Commercial Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Akron, Ohio
Posts: 1,477
When the difference between the heavy loaded tire and light loaded tire is over 1,000#, which is not unusual, we are only looking at WHEN will the heavy loaded tire fail not IF the heavy loaded tire will fail.

Tires do not carry an average load. They carry the load placed on them. They have no way of knowing and adjusting for poor load distribution done by the RV assembler.
__________________
Retired Design & Quality Tire Eng. Read my tire blog RVTireSafety.NET to learn more about RV tires, valves & wheels. Read THIS post on why Tires Fail
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 03:48 PM   #97
Senior Member
 
Coma's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Emerald Coast
Posts: 1,757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Sounds like a good policy / attitude. But untill people start walking away from the deal with all the "Bling" and demand better quality in their RV we won't see better quality in the showroom.
Agreed, which is why it is unlikely I will ever buy new.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
How is it possible for Korean manufacturers to offer 10/100,000 drivetrain and 3/36 or 5/50 on the rest of the car but the best most RV "Assemblers" (not manufacturers in my book) is 1/12,000 knowing full well that most warranty costs will fall on the owner.
Simple, they are subsidized by their government…..and ours, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
I'm not gonna spend two days and drive 350 miles to have items fixed that should never have left the garage where the RV was assembled. What I will do is nevery buy that brand RV (Coachmen) again.
Exactly why the used MH has so much value, IMO.
__________________
Jim and Jennie, Cats=Bittles and Potter, 2000 Dynasty 350 ISC
2013 Silverado 4x4 Towed with R1200GS in bed.
PROV23:4 Do not wear yourself out to get rich; have the wisdom to show restraint.
Coma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2014, 11:04 AM   #98
Senior Member
Commercial Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Akron, Ohio
Posts: 1,477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coma View Post
Simple, they are subsidized by their government…..and ours, too.
Sorry i don't see the "Government is Bad" conspiracy theory applying in this situation. Even if there was significant subsidies but no real improvement in design or build quality, the vehicles involved would be lined up around the block waiting for repair service under warranty. This is just not happening.

I have put over 150,000 total on three Hyundai cars. The total warranty costs to me were $0. The total number of trips to dealer service was two.
One was a burned out headlight, which was replaced for free. The other was a non-safety recall concerning the sun roof motor switch which was replaced for free. Tell me an RV company that will replace a single light bulb?

Now compare that to the numerous items improperly designed or assembled by Coachmen including items such as bare electric wire ends, paint cans left rolling around under the floor, six corroded brake & back-up light bulbs, mis-mounted water pump, corroded rear bumper, rusted water inlet panel, leaking front coach window, short glass retainer strip on side window, 1/4" to 1/2" gaps in area of coach to cab attachment, water drains directing water onto electrical controls, incorrect venting of refrigerator, incorrectly labeled factory wiring diagram, incorrect wire color selection, missing trim screws, crushed heat duct hoses, improperly mounted holding tank dump valves, improper selection of body screws resulting in 90% being corroded and rusting while the chassis bolts and screws have no rust or corrosion.
__________________

__________________
Retired Design & Quality Tire Eng. Read my tire blog RVTireSafety.NET to learn more about RV tires, valves & wheels. Read THIS post on why Tires Fail
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tire pressure



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tire pressures and overloading Ray,IN iRV2.com General Discussion 3 05-18-2014 06:27 PM
Tire Pressures 2014 Dutch Star 4369 jimfryar Newmar Owner's Forum 13 04-22-2014 09:20 AM
Tire pressures, extenders and airing up etc usdave1t Class A Motorhome Discussions 4 04-14-2014 11:02 AM
Tire pressures? Recommended seems very low. plasma800 Class A Motorhome Discussions 22 01-24-2014 10:27 AM
Checking MH tire pressures with/without removing wheel covers? mikecosgrove Forest River Owners Forum 3 01-22-2014 01:01 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.