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Old 02-18-2012, 12:30 PM   #15
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If the OP's tires cannot be aired successfully, how did the tire installer air the tires?

Something is missing in the description.

(BTW, you get a lot of nitrogen in your tires just by using compressed air to fill your tires.)
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:42 PM   #16
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Not if you want to monitor the tires individually....
But you can monitor the pressure in the two tires using a single sensor. If the Crossfire has to act because one tire is losing air the remaining tire will experience a modest pressure loss which you should see on your TPMS monitor.
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Old 02-18-2012, 01:47 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by deandec View Post
If the OP's tires cannot be aired successfully, how did the tire installer air the tires?
Installers air up the tires before they are mounted on the MH.

IMHO the valves are pointed the correct direction. Every dual wheel MH I have owned has the valve stems pointed in on the outer tire. My current MH has the valve stems on both the outer tire on the dual wheel axle and the tire on the tag axle pointed in. The only tires that have the stem pointed out are the front wheels and the inner dual wheels.

BTW our current coach has steel braided extensions installed for the last 9 years and there are no problems with leaks... if they are good quailty, installed properly and not damaged there should be no issue with a steel braided valve stem extension!
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:04 PM   #18
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I will dispute this if you don't mind. Depending on the length of the valve stems, often times the angle head dual foot still won't allow you to gauge the outside tire. Removal of the simulators is necessary in most cases. Sometimes this doesn't even help. I have a basic automotive type air chuck and gauge with a flex hose that sometimes I can reach between the wheels to do the job but this isn't something Mr. RV Owner would want to do regularly.
You are absolutely correct, I was thinking of my aluminum wheels. When I had simulators on my Brave, it was a real problem. The holes was not big enough to get at the stems.
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Old 02-19-2012, 04:40 AM   #19
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Once again, after reading these posts, I am amazed at the number of RVer's that do not understand the importance and the mechanics of RV tires versus how OTR trucker tires are used and their differences.

When large 22.5 inch RV wheels are made, the short stems are mounted ALL at the same direction. That means the front wheels have the short stem pointing out, the inside dual wheel is the same with the short stem pointing out, however the outside dual is turned around to make it fit correctly, therefore the short stem is pointing in. This is exactly the same as OTR truck wheels. This method may be OK for them but it makes it very difficult for us Rver's.

To make it easier to air up and maintain proper inflation of the tires, these stems need to be removed and replaced with longer ones depending on the wheel position. WRT 22.5 inch wheels there is no swapping out or typical rotating the tires/wheels, it just isn't going to happen period. Therefore ALL wheels can be fitted with the proper facing and length of stems to make it VERY easy to air up the tire or use any TPMS to monitor proper inflation of the tires.

In regards to add-on devices, such as Cat's Eye's, Crossfires, braided extensions, or for that matter any extension, etc. these are all devices that may and can cause an air leak to occur and have caused air leaks for many RVers'. For me, I do not want to have ANY possible place for air to leak, other than the tire itself, valve stem or TPMS.

Tires are where the rubber hits the road literally and your safety and life depends solely on their integrity. Take good care of your tires and they will take care of you.

Only my opinion and $.02 on this topic.

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Old 02-19-2012, 06:25 PM   #20
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Two comments:

First: That is the normal and proper installation of dual tires, both valve stems point "IN" as it were... They make a special (A whole range of them in fact) double headed tire chuck you push it in against the inner dual valve and pull out against the outer dual valve.

Any truck stop will have them, Some are better than others, You can also get them at RV rallies, FMCA, Escapees and the like.

Second: Nitrogen is not all that it's cracked up to be, save your money. You would do better to invest in a proper Tire Pressure Monitoring System.
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Old 02-20-2012, 12:40 PM   #21
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I have a Winn DP. It came with the outside stems pointed in. The wheels themselves are aluminum. Where the stem goes into the rim, there is a hex nut holding the valve stem. If you want to turn the valve around, all you need to do is loosen the nut and turn the stem around. If you dont see a nut, you are out of luck.
Now the qualifiers:
1) There must be enough room in the holes in the wheels to be able to rotate the stem. The holes in my wheels are oval and it was no problem. Smaller round holes might not work.
2) You need to loosen the nut enough to get flexibility in the stem. You can loosen the nut however much is required without loosing pressure. The stem inside the wheel is flat round steel and holds a rubber washer against the rim with the pressure inside. Providing you just turn the valve stem and don't push it too far to get through the holes, you will not lose tire pressure.
3) If you search the forums, you will find there are many threads on doing this.
4) As other have pointed out, the stems point inwards for optimum protection. I pointed mine so the ends point backwards when moving rather than straight out.
5) It is extremely simpy and will take you less time to actually do it than it does to read this!

Have fun,
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Old 02-20-2012, 12:44 PM   #22
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Hi Carl

Its always a good idea to check back with your dealer first to see if they will turn and extend the stems for you. However if this proves to be too expensive try some local truck repair centers they are always cheaper than the RV dealers.
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Old 02-20-2012, 01:28 PM   #23
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YUP, my stems look like this:



NO problem - and the tire installer didn't rip me off, or screw up - that is the USUAL way these dual tires and stems are installed! And while Internet pics are sometimes deceiving, that outer valve stem IS angled inward at a steep angle - and the inner stem to the left, has an extender installed.

The "fix", or common method of checking air pressure, and adding air? a setup like this:



NOW, wouldn't I have looked like a fool if I had returned to the tire shop with loud complaints and accusations - all because *I* was unfamiliar with the facts - AND how to deal with the "problem"?

OH - and for the record, WHY would this tire/stem mounting method be any more - or less- practical for an 18 wheeler or an RVer? They BOTH must routinely check tire pressures!
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Old 02-20-2012, 03:17 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deandec View Post
If the OP's tires cannot be aired successfully, how did the tire installer air the tires?

Something is missing in the description.

(BTW, you get a lot of nitrogen in your tires just by using compressed air to fill your tires.)
Compressed air has moisture
Nitrogen is DRY no moisture
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Old 02-20-2012, 03:38 PM   #25
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Compressed air has moisture
Nitrogen is DRY no moisture

Good compressors have air dryers, which take most of the moisture out. Now most home compssors do not have dryers, unless the owner has added one, which no big thing to do.
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Old 02-20-2012, 03:52 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobmac View Post
I have a Winn DP. It came with the outside stems pointed in. The wheels themselves are aluminum. Where the stem goes into the rim, there is a hex nut holding the valve stem. If you want to turn the valve around, all you need to do is loosen the nut and turn the stem around. If you dont see a nut, you are out of luck.
Now the qualifiers:
1) There must be enough room in the holes in the wheels to be able to rotate the stem. The holes in my wheels are oval and it was no problem. Smaller round holes might not work.
2) You need to loosen the nut enough to get flexibility in the stem. You can loosen the nut however much is required without loosing pressure. The stem inside the wheel is flat round steel and holds a rubber washer against the rim with the pressure inside. Providing you just turn the valve stem and don't push it too far to get through the holes, you will not lose tire pressure.
3) If you search the forums, you will find there are many threads on doing this.
4) As other have pointed out, the stems point inwards for optimum protection. I pointed mine so the ends point backwards when moving rather than straight out.
5) It is extremely simpy and will take you less time to actually do it than it does to read this!

Have fun,
Maybe I'm not understanding the problem correctly but I totally agree with the above and did exactly that on my DP... which came from the factory with the stem for the outer duals pointed inward. I simply loosened the hex nut a bit and turned the stem so it was facing backward. MUCH easier to air up and to install/remove my TPMS sensors.

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Old 02-21-2012, 01:39 AM   #27
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Quote:
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Maybe I'm not understanding the problem correctly but I totally agree with the above and did exactly that on my DP... which came from the factory with the stem for the outer duals pointed inward. I simply loosened the hex nut a bit and turned the stem so it was facing backward. MUCH easier to air up and to install/remove my TPMS sensors.

Rick
The inward pointed stem on the outside duals is standard in the industry, but, as others have said, if you are never going to change the wheels around do what you want. We have alum wheels and different size front tires than rear so I'll never change the wheels around. I could turn the outer rear stems around if I wanted, but I already have the dual foot gauges and filler setup so I won't.

But if you ever have a truck tire shop work on your tires you will get some strange looks and questions about the valves stems pointing the wrong way.
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Old 02-21-2012, 05:46 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkmesser View Post
Good compressors have air dryers, which take most of the moisture out. Now most home compssors do not have dryers, unless the owner has added one, which no big thing to do.
The only air compressors that I have ever seen are @ scuba shops that dry the air before filling a tank & they cost thousands of dollars.
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