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Old 10-15-2013, 09:02 PM   #1
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Tires during storage

Storing my Class A in the driveway for the NewEngland winter. Is it better to store the tires on plywood, rubber, or just on the asphalt? Figure at least four months.
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:13 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlynch View Post
Storing my Class A in the driveway for the NewEngland winter. Is it better to store the tires on plywood, rubber, or just on the asphalt? Figure at least four months.
Rubber
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Old 10-16-2013, 07:33 AM   #3
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Plywood or plastic is best. I am told by a Michelin rep that asphalt and rubber are not good for tires in storage.

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Old 10-16-2013, 08:01 AM   #4
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Question, What to use? A thick piece of plastic that will not break under the tires?? Ideas?
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Old 10-16-2013, 08:15 AM   #5
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The best thing to do is move it about once a month so it is setting on a differant part of the tires.
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Old 10-16-2013, 03:47 PM   #6
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Any thin piece of plastic that supports the entire tire width is good to use. Contact this company to see if they make landing strips. I have three sets of their landing strips.
Ranger Design
4875 70th Ave.
Princeton, MN 55371
(888) 290-5583
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Old 10-16-2013, 08:57 PM   #7
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I park mine on carpet samples. Asphalt and concrete
are specifically harmful to the rubber compounds.
Modern radial tires do not flat spot.
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Old 10-16-2013, 09:03 PM   #8
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What about pea gravel?
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Old 10-16-2013, 09:54 PM   #9
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I always have to laugh when this comes up. Asphalt and concrete harmful to rubber? The tires are designed to operate on asphalt and concrete.

Consider how incredibly tough tire compounds are. You would need a surface with a petrochemical puddle that can actually break the rubber bonds, AND get absorbed into the tire, AND remain viable over months of evaporation, AND not be converted by the rubber into some other less active compound as the rubber breaks down into it - that's what it would take to ruin tires in storage.

Plastic has a far greater chance of having some type of chemical reaction with rubber than the road surfaces.

Also the OP is in New England. The temperature is going to drop and there won't be much of a chemical reaction going on at all.

These are just wive's tales with no physics to back them up (at least over the time and normal conditions you would run into in storage - if you park your RV in the middle of an abandoned Houston refinery for several months all bet are off)

Flip the problem around the other way - what would the effects of a tire sitting on concrete for months be?
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Old 10-17-2013, 07:51 AM   #10
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Copied from the Michelin web site..

. Also, some storage surfaces can cause tires to age faster. That’s why Michelin recommends placing a barrier (cardboard, plastic or plywood) between the tire and the storage surface. Here are some other steps motorhome owners can take to help reduce the aging effects from long-term storage: 1. Thoroughly clean tires with soap and water before placing into storage. 2. Cover tires to block direct sunlight and ultraviolet rays. 3. Store out of a high ozone area. Note: When a vehicle is stored, tires should be inflated to the inflation pressure indicated on the sidewall. Before removing the vehicle from long-term storage, thoroughly inspect each tire — this in
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Old 10-17-2013, 10:14 PM   #11
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I always have to laugh when this comes up. Asphalt and concrete harmful to rubber? The tires are designed to operate on asphalt and concrete.

Consider how incredibly tough tire compounds are. You would need a surface with a petrochemical puddle that can actually break the rubber bonds, AND get absorbed into the tire, AND remain viable over months of evaporation, AND not be converted by the rubber into some other less active compound as the rubber breaks down into it - that's what it would take to ruin tires in storage.

Plastic has a far greater chance of having some type of chemical reaction with rubber than the road surfaces.

Also the OP is in New England. The temperature is going to drop and there won't be much of a chemical reaction going on at all.

These are just wive's tales with no physics to back them up (at least over the time and normal conditions you would run into in storage - if you park your RV in the middle of an abandoned Houston refinery for several months all bet are off)

Flip the problem around the other way - what would the effects of a tire sitting on concrete for months be?
You seem very sure of your "opinions". After you talk to a Michelin or other tire company rep, please report their recommendations here so that others trying to learn the correct methods of storage are not misled.

Don
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Old 10-18-2013, 01:18 AM   #12
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Given that the last set of michelins bought for my truck had the sidewalls crack badly and the last set bought for my wife's CRV lasted less than 1/2 the warranty miles I'd say air is damaging to their tires.....

OBTW "some storage surfaces" isn't necessarily "concrete"
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Old 10-18-2013, 06:39 AM   #13
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It is the Ying and the Yang, My Michelin's on the MH lasted 10 years easy, looked great when I changed them for another set of Michelin's. The ones on our CR-V are proving to be the best tire we have owned by far.

No particular arrangements other than cleaning made for our tires ever when we store on asphalt.

Another person has a disaster using the same procedure as mine. Which is no procedure. However it is almost impossible to determine if storage had anything to do with tire failures experienced.

One day it would be really nice to have something definitive but the results seem to be quite individual.

Following the manufactures recommendation seems to be a good idea regardless of where or when or how you store. Assuming you can find out what that is easily.

My guess is plywood would seem to be non offensive to tire materials. But I am also sure an opinion will be delivered saying plywood is some how bad for tires.

But if I were worried about this (which I am not because of my personal experience of putting nothing under my tires in storage) I would use plywood.
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Old 10-18-2013, 08:12 AM   #14
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Again, mine sits on pea gravel. No chemical makeup and good drainage. How can that affect tires? Any opinion?
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