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Old 02-02-2016, 09:56 AM   #15
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If you're in the "Peace of Mind" camp, a TPMS system is for you. I've gone from having a Tireminder TPMS on my travel trailer, to doing a pressure check before leaving every day's drive on my DP, to doing "frequent" tire pressure checks on my DP and just doing a pre flight visual with a "thunk" test (smacking the tires with a small club and listening to make sure they all give the same thunk noise).
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Old 02-02-2016, 11:26 AM   #16
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My one tire mishap was a slow leak. By the time I felt the coach pulling the tire was damaged beyond safe use. Road side tire replacement $500. TPMS $250.
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Old 02-02-2016, 11:33 AM   #17
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The old fashioned way is okay. However, it will be of no help if you run over something and start losing air. Especially in the rear where it will be less noticeable.
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Old 02-02-2016, 11:54 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdagro View Post
Just took delivery of my new 2015 Newmar Dutch Star 4369. trying to decide whether to get a TPMS or do it the old fashion way....trusty tire gauge? YOUR THOUGHTS???? Thanks in advance. Steve
These are not mutually exclusive. A TMPS is a current, real time way to track tire pressure that also gives you real time alarms if you exceed pressure limits and/or have a sudden loss of pressure.

No pre-flight methods will do this. It is that simple.

Beyond that you will probably never know if you had a blow out on your toad until you see the smoke out the rear view mirror or someone pulls up along side of you and gets your attention. I know of a gentleman that had a new TPMS for both the coach and toad but for some reason never got around to installing it. 3 hours after leaving his winter hang out he got waved over by a passing car. His nearly new Jeep's front left tire was on fire and by the time they got the fire out it totaled the jeep.

I'll be honest, I am truly amazed that anyone wouldn't take advantage of TPMS technology. A TPMS won't stop or predict blow outs caused by road damage and unknown tire defects. What it can do is alert you of conditions that MIGHT later cause problems ranging from a slow leak up to extremely high tire temps/pressure. BTW...there are have been several folks over the years that have posted that the TPMS showed high temps caused by brake problems before they cause a fire.

Here is how you will probably adapt/evolve with a TPMS...

1. You will double check all tire pressures with a high quality pressure gauge and compare it to your TPMS readings. This is a VERY GOOD practice as you incorporate a TMPS into your RV safety practices.

2. You will gain a working knowledge of factors that affect tire pressure. You will see the affects of rising and dropping ambient temps on tire pressure. You will see how driving on them increases PSI. You will even see how the sun affects tire temps and pressure both when sitting and driving. BTW...you will also see how a DP exhaust will raise the tire pressure on a toad wheel exposed to the hot exhaust. You will also see what happens to tire pressure when you travel from warm to cold temps and visa versa. Keep in mind that you will gain about 2 PSI for every 10* rise in temps and lose the same for every 10* drop in temps.

3. With a better understanding of all factors your TPMS will become your "go to" preflight check for tire pressure. After you get a good feel for a typical tolerance (usually +/- 2 PSI) you will later be able to use that information to quick check tires as part of your pre-flight. That doesn't mean you shouldn't visually inspect tires but IMHO, it eliminates the need to use a manual tire pressure gauge.

However, regarding sensor tolerance, when ever TPMS tells me that there is a need to change tire pressure I double check pressures with my hand held gauge. That means on a regular basis I validate that my TPMS is producing results I can trust.

Finally, I suggest that if you go with a TPMS that you set your lower limit to 5% below your target tire pressure and 20% above the tires max PSI. As an example; If your target pressure is 100 PSI with a tire that has a max of 120 PSI then the lower limit is 95 PSI and the upper is 144 PSI. The 5% below will keep you honest on running on a low PSI. The upper limit will protect you from excessive pressure and nuisance alarms. I apply the same parameters to establishing the upper and lower limits for the toad tires.

In closing I admit that it all sounds technical and it can be. As we drive our cars around with little or no thought about those tires it is easy to feel RV tires shouldn't need that much more attention. However, if you put in the effort to understand TMPSs and factors affecting tire pressure, I say that in the long run it will actually simplify your pre-flight safety checks and at the same time give you a real-time way to monitor tire pressure. Sounds like a win-win to me.
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Old 02-02-2016, 12:04 PM   #19
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Looks like your going to get one.
But one point that nobody mentioned.....
No matter how good of a tire gauge you have, as soon as you go around the corner, you could pick up a nail. Now you might have a slow leak.
Driving for the rest of the day, or even 4 hours could result in a under inflated tire...which could end up as a blow-out.

And +1 on sensors for the TOAD that you cant see in the mirrors....unless your turning.

Regards,

Dan
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Old 02-02-2016, 04:35 PM   #20
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I'm one of those who was saved from a potential towing catastrophe by a TPMS. Left a campground with the toad behind and hadn't gone 3 miles when I got high temperature warnings from the toad. The auxiliary brake system wasn't installed right (my fault!) and the brakes were partially on. The tires were rotating but the brakes got hot enough to trigger the high temperature limit. No amount of preflight gauge checking would have caught that. We stopped to let things cool and were on our way AFTER correcting the toad brake setup.
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Old 02-02-2016, 04:59 PM   #21
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I don't have a TPMS, and don't want one. They can cause
problems as well. I check my pressure with a high quality
gauge from time to time, in the interim, I stop in the
first hour or two and shoot them with an IR temp gauge.
A low tire will run hot, and I check them each morning visually.
6 years, 76,000miles and no problems. The professional
truck drivers are starting to use internal rim mounted units,
I've never seen a commercial vehicle with the little do-dads
screwed onto the valve stems. JMHO
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Old 02-02-2016, 05:02 PM   #22
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My TireTraker TPMS has saved my tires on two different occasions, so to answer your question, I would NOT leave home without it!
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Old 02-02-2016, 06:05 PM   #23
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tire minder, 3 years still going cool. cw has it.
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Old 02-02-2016, 06:39 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky_Boss View Post
These are not mutually exclusive. A TMPS is a current, real time way to track tire pressure that also gives you real time alarms if you exceed pressure limits and/or have a sudden loss of pressure.

No pre-flight methods will do this. It is that simple.

Beyond that you will probably never know if you had a blow out on your toad until you see the smoke out the rear view mirror or someone pulls up along side of you and gets your attention. I know of a gentleman that had a new TPMS for both the coach and toad but for some reason never got around to installing it. 3 hours after leaving his winter hang out he got waved over by a passing car. His nearly new Jeep's front left tire was on fire and by the time they got the fire out it totaled the jeep.

I'll be honest, I am truly amazed that anyone wouldn't take advantage of TPMS technology. A TPMS won't stop or predict blow outs caused by road damage and unknown tire defects. What it can do is alert you of conditions that MIGHT later cause problems ranging from a slow leak up to extremely high tire temps/pressure. BTW...there are have been several folks over the years that have posted that the TPMS showed high temps caused by brake problems before they cause a fire.

Here is how you will probably adapt/evolve with a TPMS...

1. You will double check all tire pressures with a high quality pressure gauge and compare it to your TPMS readings. This is a VERY GOOD practice as you incorporate a TMPS into your RV safety practices.

2. You will gain a working knowledge of factors that affect tire pressure. You will see the affects of rising and dropping ambient temps on tire pressure. You will see how driving on them increases PSI. You will even see how the sun affects tire temps and pressure both when sitting and driving. BTW...you will also see how a DP exhaust will raise the tire pressure on a toad wheel exposed to the hot exhaust. You will also see what happens to tire pressure when you travel from warm to cold temps and visa versa. Keep in mind that you will gain about 2 PSI for every 10* rise in temps and lose the same for every 10* drop in temps.

3. With a better understanding of all factors your TPMS will become your "go to" preflight check for tire pressure. After you get a good feel for a typical tolerance (usually +/- 2 PSI) you will later be able to use that information to quick check tires as part of your pre-flight. That doesn't mean you shouldn't visually inspect tires but IMHO, it eliminates the need to use a manual tire pressure gauge.

However, regarding sensor tolerance, when ever TPMS tells me that there is a need to change tire pressure I double check pressures with my hand held gauge. That means on a regular basis I validate that my TPMS is producing results I can trust.

Finally, I suggest that if you go with a TPMS that you set your lower limit to 5% below your target tire pressure and 20% above the tires max PSI. As an example; If your target pressure is 100 PSI with a tire that has a max of 120 PSI then the lower limit is 95 PSI and the upper is 144 PSI. The 5% below will keep you honest on running on a low PSI. The upper limit will protect you from excessive pressure and nuisance alarms. I apply the same parameters to establishing the upper and lower limits for the toad tires.

In closing I admit that it all sounds technical and it can be. As we drive our cars around with little or no thought about those tires it is easy to feel RV tires shouldn't need that much more attention. However, if you put in the effort to understand TMPSs and factors affecting tire pressure, I say that in the long run it will actually simplify your pre-flight safety checks and at the same time give you a real-time way to monitor tire pressure. Sounds like a win-win to me.
I agree with everything you said except the low pressure setting. I f you carry 100 psi and set the low at 5% which would be 95 psi spring and fall travel will drive you nuts. If you inflate to 95 psi in the afternoon before you leave and it is 75 degrees the next morning if it 50 degrees your alarms will be going off.
I would also point out that even after you check the TPMS tire pressures you should always do a visual inspection every now and then.
I would not be without TPMS and we have the TST 507 non flow through which have been trouble free for 2 years.
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Old 02-02-2016, 07:44 PM   #25
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Very happy with the TST system I have. When you order from Mike Benson just le him know what pressures you want in each tire and it will arrive to you programed.


Another benefit of the TST system is in addition to pressure it monitors temperature.


Safe travels
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:18 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdagro View Post
Just took delivery of my new 2015 Newmar Dutch Star 4369. trying to decide whether to get a TPMS or do it the old fashion way....trusty tire gauge? YOUR THOUGHTS???? Thanks in advance. Steve

Definitely get a TPMS. This is the only way to monitor your pressure as you drive, alerting you to a leak that could lead to a blowout at speed.


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