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Old 06-14-2016, 10:35 AM   #127
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First, I fully believe in the safety advantages of seat belts. I started wearing them in my cars in the early 80s, and have always done so since.

We have never had passengers in the RV, but our sofa that faces sideways has factory mounted belts and I would expect passengers to wear them. But, I also believe that those belts that have the passengers seated sideways are of minor effectiveness in anything but a hard stop or minor incident, and that if you roll over, the chances of passengers in the living area of the coach seriously getting hurt or killed by stuff falling out of cabinets, or the fridge, oven, etc. being ripped out is fairly high.

As for the RV, yes, we both wear them "all the time, but......"

We get up and use the toilet, grab a snack, etc.

If there was a "good reason" (like being sick) for one of us to need to lay down on the bed or couch, I'd be ok with that unless there were some extenuating circumstances.

For those that never ever leave thier seats, I have to ask just how you would survive on a boat offshore? Yes, I understand some have mobility issues, etc., and you have to keep kids generally planted, but to a great degree moving about in an RV is no different than moving about, sleeping, and even preparing hot meals on a boat - and, on a boat, you may not have a choice when be moving around on or below deck, or getting tossed around in your bunk, even in rough conditions........

In an RV you can simply pick your time to move about, so to minimize the chances of someone getting hurt. Is it 100% safe, no, but it is reasonably managing risk.
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Old 06-14-2016, 10:49 AM   #128
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My daughter until recently was always in the front seat in a car seat. Now she sits on the coach with a seatbelt on and she is 4. I don't trust a car seat anywhere but the front passenger seat.

My wife either sits next to my daughter or in the front seat, not sure if she wears a seatbelt in the back but I will have to check with her.
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Old 06-14-2016, 10:56 AM   #129
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We do the same as big ben . had the the sme policy in the boat with lifejackets.
But I will have to say, it does get tiring for my wife to lean across from the passenger seat and hold the steering wheel while I get up and make a sandwich. Of course the cruise control is set .
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Old 06-14-2016, 11:24 AM   #130
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Betr2Trvl, A boat offshore doesn't often encounter things as hard as obstacles on a highway, and most offshore boats don't travel as fast as a land vehicle. I know that some do, but it's not a very comfortable ride and most offshore racing boats have belts and folks wear helmets. Not the most convincing argument for seat belts, but I've never needed convincing since I installed seat belts in my first 1961 vehicle!
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Old 06-14-2016, 11:45 AM   #131
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Betr2Trvl, A boat offshore doesn't often encounter things as hard as obstacles on a highway, and most offshore boats don't travel as fast as a land vehicle. I know that some do, but it's not a very comfortable ride and most offshore racing boats have belts and folks wear helmets. Not the most convincing argument for seat belts, but I've never needed convincing since I installed seat belts in my first 1961 vehicle!
I don't need convincing for seat belts either, but I do believe with some reasonable judgement moving around in a RV for a short time is generally fine.

With my boat reference, I'm not thinking about offshore power boat racers, but I am referring to people that cruise offshore in regular boats, or as my wife and I also did, race big sailboats offshore, including distance races being offshore for days at a time.

If you've ever been out in 10' seas, it can be very violent. Surfing a 70' sailboat down a swell at 10, 12, or even 20 knots (yes, surfing at 20 knots), rocking and rolling with a spinnaker up makes the biggest roller coaster seem like a merry go round. Even going upwind in a 20 knot breeze can be like riding a bucking bronco, falling off the back of a 5' or 6' swell. And being on deck to change sails in heavy weather, even on an afternoon race is just part of the sport. Even cruisers get caught in heavy seas and have to live though it.

But, in any case, you simply manage your risk while you move about, but you have to keep the boat moving in a safe manner, and eat, sleep, even take a dump without pulling into port. (Even in moderate seas, you need to hold tight on the head, and may get a splash!).

But, the chances of cracking your head against something, or getting hurt (seriously) can be just as great if not significantly more so on a boat, because many times there is just no stopping and you have to do what you have to do when you have to do it. No pulling into a rest stop, or WalMart if the weather gets rough. You are aware of the situation, and mange it accordingly and even during "normal" moderate weather, the boat is sways moving about (just like an RV),and you can always catch a wave "wrong" and pitch any type of boat, so you move around accordingly.

In an RV, the chance that you just so happen to have to hit the brakes at the exact moment that someone is getting a snack is a long shot, if you use reasonable judgement when people get up and move around. Again, it is about picking your time....
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Old 06-14-2016, 02:38 PM   #132
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First let me say I don't own a coach but I do own a boat and a car. I can't see for the life of me how anyone who has experience in a car and a boat can relate the two when it comes to seat belts.

The G forces associated with a boat in heavy seas are low compared to the G forces a person experiences in a head on collision. Plus on a boat, heavy seas are slow to come on and once experienced a person can generally brace for the rock and roll. A car collision is generally unexpected and the g forces are generally so great that a person could not brace to avoid being flung about.

Presumably seat belt laws pertain to RV's too.
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Old 06-14-2016, 03:14 PM   #133
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First let me say I don't own a coach but I do own a boat and a car. I can't see for the life of me how anyone who has experience in a car and a boat can relate the two when it comes to seat belts.

The G forces associated with a boat in heavy seas are low compared to the G forces a person experiences in a head on collision. Plus on a boat, heavy seas are slow to come on and once experienced a person can generally brace for the rock and roll. A car collision is generally unexpected and the g forces are generally so great that a person could not brace to avoid being flung about.

Presumably seat belt laws pertain to RV's too.
I'll reiterate for the 3rd time, I am all about being belted in a car or RV.

However, in an RV I will also use some common sense to move about for short periods of time when it seems reasonably safe to do so (open smooth road, little traffic). And with a bit of common sense of when to move about, it is generally safer to do so in an RV than in a boat offshore in normal conditions, and much safer than when boating in moderate to severe conditions (when at times, you have no other choice to be moving about if you are offshore).

Are the chances of getting killed on a boat higher than a car, no, but the chances of an injury from being knocked off balance, which is much more likely than being killed in either an RV or boat to begin with, are higher on a boat.

Oh, there are always the anecdotal RV horror stories, and I have boat stories too. But do you wear a harness and survival suit when you go out in your boat, and never leave the salon, of course not.

Yes, wear your seat belt, but if you are so scared about being in an accident in your RV that you won't even get up to take a quick wiz, or grab a drink on a straight, open stretch of road with no traffic, well, I just don't get it.............. I have done, and will continue to do things to live life that are a lot more dangerous than getting up to get lunch out of the fridge in my RV.
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Old 06-14-2016, 03:30 PM   #134
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I'm not being critical of anyone's decision to wear or not wear seat belts. I'm just saying that people that are not belted and get in an car accident are much more likely to get hurt than a boater in rough seas.

But I have no data that I can produce to prove my statement.

I'm not sure this is even a sensible argument.
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Old 06-14-2016, 03:38 PM   #135
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I'm not being critical of anyone's decision to wear or not wear seat belts. I'm just saying that people that are not belted and get in an car accident are much more likely to get hurt than a boater in rough seas.

But I have no data that I can produce to prove my statement.

I'm not sure this is even a sensible argument.
I totally agree with you, but to take a minute and get up in your RV to use the head, grab a drink, or lunch out of the fridge, on an open highway with no traffic is hardly taking some huge risk.........

People tend to concentrate too much on minimal risks, while ignoring the other things they do everyday that have a higher probality of hurting/ killing them or others, like driving and talking on a cell phone or eating junk food, because they don't want to change those habits........
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Old 06-14-2016, 04:21 PM   #136
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First let me say I don't own a coach but I do own a boat and a car. I can't see for the life of me how anyone who has experience in a car and a boat can relate the two when it comes to seat belts.

The G forces associated with a boat in heavy seas are low compared to the G forces a person experiences in a head on collision. Plus on a boat, heavy seas are slow to come on and once experienced a person can generally brace for the rock and roll. A car collision is generally unexpected and the g forces are generally so great that a person could not brace to avoid being flung about.

Presumably seat belt laws pertain to RV's too.
Have you ever seen a commercial vehicle like a bus or class 8 truck hit a car? It's not the same as being in a car or pick up and hitting another car. It's like being in a boat and hitting a wave. I remember about ten years ago I was following a friend to her house. She was hit by an empty mail truck (small class 8 truck with short trailer) while crossing the intersection. The truck pushed her for a block before stopping. He only stopped when he saw the smoke coming up from his tire. He had no idea there was a car trapped under his bumper. A large RV that weighs 15 tons or more will simply plow through a passenger car. It'd be like hitting turbulence in an airplane. You can't really compare being in a car and hitting a car to being in an RV and hitting a car, unless you're in a small RV.


Of course, the other question is, what's the point of owning a class A if your passengers can't utilize the facilities while underway? Otherwise you might as well be pulling a trailer.
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