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Old 05-28-2012, 12:54 PM   #1
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usage of cooktop

I love using my 3 burner cooktop, gas is great to cook with, but do I need to open the vent in the roof while I cook. Sometimes I smell the gas in the rig.
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Old 05-28-2012, 01:00 PM   #2
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We always open our Fantastic fan vent in the galley when cooking. Removes vapors, etc. We also keep a second vent open to insure fresh air entering the coach to replace the used up O2.
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Old 05-28-2012, 01:01 PM   #3
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You should not need to open the roof vent. The amount of exhaust gas from a stove is miniscule and does not require venting.

If you are convinced you smell unburned gas, have the stove checked to make sure that there isn't a leaking valve somewhere. Perhaps when you turn a burner on, some gas is leaking by the valve as well as going down the pipe to the burner.

You have a LP gas alarm, probably very near the stove, that would warn you of even a tiny amount of LP Gas in the air.
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Old 05-29-2012, 05:10 PM   #4
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open up the window in the kitchen a bit to replace the air used for combustion, and open a roof vent a bit to allow the moisture from cooking to get out.
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Old 05-29-2012, 06:51 PM   #5
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If you had a gas leak, your gas detector should be alerting you. You might be smelling methane gas from the black tank.
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Old 05-29-2012, 07:03 PM   #6
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If you had a gas leak, your gas detector should be alerting you. You might be smelling methane gas from the black tank.
I would never suggest to DW that it's possible I confused the smell from the kitchen with the smell from the black tank.
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Old 05-29-2012, 07:24 PM   #7
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You may well get a very brief whiff of propane as there may be a moment or two between turning on the knob and igniting. If you smell propane when you are not using the stove then you should be really wary. Had someone accidentally knock one of the burner controls just enough once that some propane started flowing. It was evident quick enough and since nothing that uses propane was actually in use, it was a pretty good clue that something was wrong.

Once lit, you shouldn't be smelling anything. Also, many of the convection, microwaves have a vent built into them which you can turn on if connected to shore power (depending on what you have).

Don't necessarily depend on a propane detector either. Distressingly, too many units have these detectors mounted high up. Propane is a heavy gas. It will settle in low spaces which is why it can be especially dangerous in boats. It will collect inside the hull with no place to go just waiting for a bilge pump to start and then boom. Fortunately most RV's are not very air tight at floor level and the gas can leak away but having the detector at 5 feet above floor level is plain stupid. If the gas gets up that high, you have a real problem.
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Old 05-29-2012, 09:23 PM   #8
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Even if the burner is not on for an extended period of time, you should open a vent and a window. Why take a chance.

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Old 05-29-2012, 10:18 PM   #9
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I open the vent most of the time. More than combustion gasses to expell, heat, odors, moisture etc; wife would prefer to leave it closed. She gets cold. Our microwave above the stove has an outside exhaust which we both use frequently when cooking.
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Old 05-29-2012, 10:49 PM   #10
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Propane smell in RV

Our stove top lifts up and can be taken off. Then you can use a spray bottle with mostly water and a few gtts. of dish soap to test all stove burners/connections for leaks. Our connection where the gas line comes into the stove had a crack in the fitting. DH smelled gas and he has a poor sense of smell. It will buble up if you have a leak. Fitting replaced and passed the buble test. We also had our Rv dealer do a dropdown propane test to make sure we had no other leaks.
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Old 05-30-2012, 08:00 AM   #11
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Quote:
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Don't necessarily depend on a propane detector either. Distressingly, too many units have these detectors mounted high up. Propane is a heavy gas. It will settle in low spaces which is why it can be especially dangerous in boats. It will collect inside the hull with no place to go just waiting for a bilge pump to start and then boom. Fortunately most RV's are not very air tight at floor level and the gas can leak away but having the detector at 5 feet above floor level is plain stupid. If the gas gets up that high, you have a real problem.
I had forgotten that! Would it be a good idea to put a detector out in the tank bay where all the fittings are?
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Old 05-31-2012, 12:35 AM   #12
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I'm not sure how helpful that would be. My tank bay, for example, has an open bottom and even if it didn't, it is so far away from where I am likely to be at any given point I wouldn't likely hear it. Probably the most sound advice that I can give is to have the system pressure tested by a licensed professional. You probably should be doing that at least every couple of years anyways. If the system passes, you can feel some confidence and if it doesn't, it is a case for being repaired by a certified individual. The good news is that Propane does require a fairly strong concentration to be really dangerous. When you consider the amount of propane tanks out there, and the relative scarcity of catastrophic events, it says generally how safe it is.
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Old 05-31-2012, 12:44 AM   #13
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I had forgotten that! Would it be a good idea to put a detector out in the tank bay where all the fittings are?
Wouldn't help. Firstly, with open compartments (which most if not all of them are) the LPG will drop to the ground. Secondly, the open air will disperse it before it can concentrate enough to reach a flashpoint.

If you are concerned about the fittings on your frame tank, you might use the soapy mixture on the fittings at the tank and regulator, looking for bubbles. If leaks, tighten with wrenches.
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Old 05-31-2012, 01:06 AM   #14
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open up the window in the kitchen a bit to replace the air used for combustion, and open a roof vent a bit to allow the moisture from cooking to get out.
Kinda the same here except it also lets some of the heat out as the Fantastic Fan is right over my head when at the stove.
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