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Old 04-12-2015, 09:10 AM   #15
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My biggest issue with propane was getting it in some areas. Other places it was no problem. But dang, when you have to unhook at the park and drive 10-15 miles just to fill the tank.

We're in who knows where for work and always at a campground of some sort, all electric is perfect for us.

All we need is a 15 amp outlet, water, sewer and we are happy campers. Yes we can do just fine on 15 amp.

During times of high draw, our inverter kicks on and fills in the needed power. Then when all loads die down, it switches back to charging mode.

When boondocking we only need to run the genny for about 2 hours a day to fill the batteries. In the 3 years we've had this coach, we've done everything we did with the other coach and more. We just never need propane.

Most that have never experienced an all electric coach, grossly over exaggerate the power needs. Almost as bad as the propane frigs are fire prone crowd.
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:10 AM   #16
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Like all things RV, everyone will have their preferences based on how they use their unit. Being FT, we prefer all electric. Not often are we not plugged in ... but we can certainly boondock with preparation .... but doesn't happen often. If we were more off in the woods, propane would likely make more sense.
All electric simply mean ... no propane.
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:14 AM   #17
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We do not seem to lack hot water or cold ice cream and beverages with propane. All that generator time is not cheap. Probably costs as much or more as running propane. I find the whole thing somewhat puzzling.

I would rate it as the same costs, but diesel is much easier to get.

While in some areas propane is not a problem, it's still not as easy as pulling up to a pump and filling it yourself.
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:57 AM   #18
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Thank you for explaining the auto Gen stting.
I just remembered looking at anew all electric Tiffin and being told the Gen automatically comes on when the batteries get low. Like the idea of the "quiet hours"setting. We seldom boondock anyway.
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Old 04-12-2015, 12:07 PM   #19
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7 of our RVs had LP on board. We specified our "retirement home" had to be all electric. Finding an LP refill station that had room for a 43' motorhome to maneuver is not something I wanted to deal with, not to mention the inconvenience of having to pull up camp to get there. It was hard enough with our 35' rig. By "losing" the LP tank we also gained an additional storage bay. We have gone without hookups for up to a week. A couple hours of generator use per day will generally provide all the power we need, for everything, including cooking. (A/C needs shore or generator power, no matter how your rig is equipped otherwise)

Boondocking takes planning, no matter what your energy source is.

In our case the heat and hot water are supplied by the diesel fired boiler. We literally could sit on our winter site all 5 months and never be concerned about running out of fuel. The boiler is very efficient and diesel supplies more BTUs per gallon than LP. Friends with LP furnaces will be looking for LP after the first week of a cold spell, maybe two if they'd just topped of their tank.

For even an LP equipped rig you're going to have to manage your electric use very closely to avoid excessive use of the generator. LP rigs will typically come with two house batteries, perhaps 4 in a larger or higher end rig. Ours came with 8. As already mentioned, some very high end rigs may come with up to 16. Either type of rig can go for days if you forgo TV, avoid using lights (and convert those you need to use to LED), the coffee pot, hairdryer....

We can use our microwave on battery power but it will suck them down in a big hurry. We've done that to heat up a can of soup, as example, while in a rest stop for lunch, but to prepare a meal I will crank up the generator. We do not have a cooktop that will work without shore or generator power. The cooktop requires more power than can be supplied by the batteries. If we boondocked more frequently I'd use the old reliable Coleman stove.

We have no fear of LP, as stated all but our latest rig had it on-board, but I suspect many of those that are so adamant that boondocking in an all electric puts you at some disadvantage have not spent any real time using one, or considered that many of the same upgrades they've done to extend their time in the boonies can also be done to the all electric. We have friends with a 45' Newel on which he's installed both electric and water heating solar panels. Combined with his huge fuel, water and holding tanks I suspect he could take up residence anywhere he wanted for up to a month without regard to what hookups or services are available.

You need to consider how you're most likely to use the rig, most of the time, and shop accordingly, be it the need for space or energy. Worrying over something you might do once in a blue moon will drive you insane.
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Old 04-12-2015, 12:41 PM   #20
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We're getting ready to buy our first RV, and I used to worry and wonder about this topic a lot. But, after some pretty extensive research, I've come to the conclusion that we're going to buy what we fall in love with - we'll be able to adapt to whatever its source of power is pretty easily.

I suspect we're not the only ones.
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Old 04-12-2015, 01:33 PM   #21
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Propane or all electric both work well. People who boondock for a week at a time will claim they can only use propane. Some here hate trying to fill a propane tank on a big rig. Either way, it's what works best for you.

People didn't start going all electric just because, things have become more electronically sophisticated and people started demanding safer/larger refers. Electric was the way to go.

My coach came all electric with the exception of a 2 burner gas cooktop. They installed a 350 pound propane tank and took up a large storage bay just for the tank. For me, it was a waste. I added an electric cooktop, dumped the tank and now have a large storage area.

We dry camp for 5 days at Yosemite every year at Thanksgiving. We do fine with all electric. I run the generator for two hours in the morning during breakfast and showers and were good. We turn the generator on for dinner and were done charging until the next day. Even if we had propane, we still do most of our cooking in the microwave as I'm sure others do and would require the generator.

The wave of the future is all electric.....so don't fight it.
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Old 04-12-2015, 01:45 PM   #22
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You can program the quiet time as per some campgrounds rules. My new London Aire will look ahead before quiet time and will top off the batteries before the quiet time even if I have set it not to start untill it gets to 12 volts. It's smart it must have someone with a volt meter and the ability to have fortune telling skills. I have looked and he is hiding somewhere in the coach at least he doesn't eat much, just electricity.
Steve
Our Magna will do that also. I just need to figure out how to set it!!
We are almost all electric. The only propane is a 5.5 gal tank for the 2 burner cooktop. I'm thinking about taking it out and going to an induction cooktop though.
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Old 04-12-2015, 01:52 PM   #23
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Also not really boondocking friendly. IT takes a lot of battery to equal the convenience of a tank of propane.
The majority of people never boondock, not counting a quick overnight in a Walmart or rest area. In 40 years of camping, I never heard the term as its meant here until the last few years. Where I tend to go, boondocking isn't an option.
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Old 04-12-2015, 02:20 PM   #24
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My coach came all electric with the exception of a 2 burner gas cooktop. They installed a 350 pound propane tank and took up a large storage bay just for the tank. For me, it was a waste. I added an electric cooktop, dumped the tank and now have a large storage area.
We did exactly the same thing. Best mod we've done to the coach in 7 years.
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:30 AM   #25
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I'm the OP for this thread and didn't mean to start an electric vs propane discussion. But now that it's morphed int that I can say with my limited experience so far I certainly could live without a propane tank for my use. We used the propane furnace and water heater in our first trip and have not used either since. We were up in Nashville and when the temp got down below 30 and the heat pump didn't work anymore we used two ceramic heaters that kept the coach nice and warm. I don't plan on doing much traveling in those temps and don't really see "boondocking " very often. We do have a triple propane burner in the coach we use occasionally.

As far as the danger of propane goes we did have a gas leak in one of our trailers once. It was outside so we didn't smell it in the trailer and the propane alarm didn't go off. I have had two electrical switches go bad in my house. One simmered for days before we realized where the smell came from and the other actually cause a small fire. Just goes to show you can't fear just one potential danger.
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Old 04-13-2015, 09:21 AM   #26
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Propane or all electric both work well. People who boondock for a week at a time will claim they can only use propane. Some here hate trying to fill a propane tank on a big rig. Either way, it's what works best for you.

People didn't start going all electric just because, things have become more electronically sophisticated and people started demanding safer/larger refers. Electric was the way to go.

My coach came all electric with the exception of a 2 burner gas cooktop. They installed a 350 pound propane tank and took up a large storage bay just for the tank. For me, it was a waste. I added an electric cooktop, dumped the tank and now have a large storage area.

We dry camp for 5 days at Yosemite every year at Thanksgiving. We do fine with all electric. I run the generator for two hours in the morning during breakfast and showers and were good. We turn the generator on for dinner and were done charging until the next day. Even if we had propane, we still do most of our cooking in the microwave as I'm sure others do and would require the generator.

The wave of the future is all electric.....so don't fight it.
Maybe but I have not seen the battery pack that will do it at a price most folks will pay. ;-)

Part of that is where you go and part is how big your rig is. If you are in a 40 ft+ you have enough roof for solar, space for batteries, and the weight capacity to carry them. If you get down into the 30 ft range or smaller there is not enough roof or capacity. By the same token if one mostly does places with power it's not a big deal to occasionally do 5 days somewhere. OTOH if one mostly goes places with no power it becomes and issue fast.
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Old 04-13-2015, 09:44 AM   #27
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I think people overestimate the current required to run an electric fridge. With today's efficient units, it is less that you would imagine.

I used to be concerned about boondocking with all-electric but it has been a complete non-issue for me. I used to run the generator 2 or 3 hours per day when I had a propane coach in order to use hair dryer, microwave and top off the batteries from using lights, Satellite, TV, water heating and sometimes space heating.

Now with all-electric, I run the generator 3-4 hours instead of the 2-3 that I used to do. The difference is only one hour per day of generator use and the benefits have been outstanding: Larger, cold refrigerator, no fear of refrigerator fire, a complete storage bay gained by losing the propane tank, never have to look for propane. I like to boondock and have no problem doing so in my all-electric coach. I would never go back to propane.
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Old 04-13-2015, 10:38 AM   #28
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I don't have an all electric yet but am looking at them. I believes if you are hooked up to shore power your batteries stay charged. The only time the generator is needed is when you are not hooked up and boo rocking in which case you don't have to worry about quiet hours.
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