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Old 09-13-2016, 08:28 PM   #43
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How does monitoring your coolant prove that that a slightly elevated copper content in your coolant is caused by thermostat brass corroding, (or an oil cooler or a tranny cooler)?

Methinks "worst case" is that the "slightly elevated copper content" in your coolant is an indication that your engine is failing.

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I contacted Tom Johnson, who runs JGLubricants, when I had an increase from 7ppm to 10ppm in a year. As it turns out the accuracy is about +- 3ppm. So a retest is planned in December. The likely sources for copper in coolant are transmission cooler and engine oil cooler. I also contacted Old World Industries with my analysis and they suggested it could be something as small as the brass in the thermostat leeching a bit of copper due to corrosion. So far no one has suggested the copper showing would be evidence of impending engine failure. If the next test confirms the copper then the next step would be a coolant flush and then a retest in six months. The recent test also confirmed that the flush I paid for some years ago didn't get all the original coolant out. Final charge is tolerant of up 25% contamination with other coolant and still perform as OAT. It may be that the copper corrosion inhibiter in my coolant is simply depleted after 4 years. We'll see.
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Old 09-13-2016, 09:52 PM   #44
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With all due deference Gordon Dewald...An actuary's job is to study the numbers and save the insurance company money. My job is to save me money. Insurance prevents that which is inherently bad, from ruining our lives. Even the boldest gambler hedges his bets somewhat.
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:39 AM   #45
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With all due deference Gordon Dewald...An actuary's job is to study the numbers and save the insurance company money. My job is to save me money.
adamfolger
So true

BTW the "job" of extended warranty companies is to take your money and deny payment of most every claim.
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Old 09-14-2016, 07:19 AM   #46
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Forums like this tend to attract owners who will readily share unpleasant experiences or costly repairs with the rest of us. What percent of RV owners are represented here? My guess is that it's less than 10%, but really do not know. Because of this (my theory) the OP should consider that those "Unexpected Repairs" with a DP are far less than what is implied here. I have owned diesel powered vehicles for over 50 years and find them to be far more durable, reliable and trouble free compared to a gas powered unit. It's true that anything mechanical can fail and repairing a diesel requires specialized training, but in light of that, if given a choice, I will go with the diesel every time.
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Old 09-14-2016, 08:05 AM   #47
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Great thread--agree with many, if not most of the inputs--kind of rare for a long running IRV2 thread. Couple of common themes come to mind: 1--diesels are generally more durable than gas but not necessarily more dependable. If you plan on long drives, lots of total miles and many years of ownership--go diesel; weekend warrior--doesn't matter as much what you buy [IMHO]. 2--diesel repairs will generally be more expensive but less costly over the longer haul. 3--Extended warrantees????? Take your chances--they are out to make money--not protect yours. 4--Seems that a lot "common" diesel repairs revolve around specific designs and technical changes, eg, rear radiator engines are more expensive to work on and are susceptible to over heat issue from blocked air flow; Cummins had some issue with piston pins in the 05/06 time frame; exhaust manifolds are an issue for the ISL; failed radiators for many coaches in 05/06; and as of late, all the EPA changes. Starting with particulate re-generators in 07. EGRs in 09, and DEF in 2010, engine builders have had significant problems with compliance--so much so that Cat got out the OTR engine business. Biggest issue I see with the new technology is that minor system failures [eg DEF tank gauge failure] will de-rate the engine and leave you stranded. Dropped valve issue with the large 600-650 Cummins is also a known issue. After 14 years and 160K miles on my ISL400, I believe the best thing you can do is not to cut corners on fluids and filters. Brand name products and regular maintenance will ensure clean oil, fuel and air--an imperative for diesels.....
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Old 09-14-2016, 08:21 AM   #48
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Forums like this tend to attract owners who will readily share unpleasant experiences or costly repairs with the rest of us. What percent of RV owners are represented here? My guess is that it's less than 10%, but really do not know. Because of this (my theory) the OP should consider that those "Unexpected Repairs" with a DP are far less than what is implied here. I have owned diesel powered vehicles for over 50 years and find them to be far more durable, reliable and trouble free compared to a gas powered unit. It's true that anything mechanical can fail and repairing a diesel requires specialized training, but in light of that, if given a choice, I will go with the diesel every time.
Crasher
The majority of reported RV repairs have little to do with whether the RV is diesel or gasoline powered.

Most reported/required RV repairs, (on BOTH diesel and gas powered coaches), are because of failures in either "house" or "chassis" parts/accessories/systems...(not engine repairs).

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Old 09-14-2016, 12:01 PM   #49
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The majority of reported RV repairs have little to do with whether the RV is diesel or gasoline powered.

Most reported/required RV repairs, (on BOTH diesel and gas powered coaches), are because of failures in either "house" or "chassis" parts/accessories/systems...(not engine repairs).

Mel
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I know that and you know that, but the OP's question was in reference to unexpected DP costs. The big difference between a gas coach and a DP is primarily the engine. Hence, my comment.
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Old 09-14-2016, 12:13 PM   #50
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I'll say it again...If you can afford to pay out of pocket for major DP power train repairs, pick a DP of your choosing and happy trails.


If you cant afford to pay 4,000 - 30,000 out of pocket, then buy a repair warranty and sleep well at night ( so you can stop worrying about it ). Even if you buy an insurance policy, you will still have many DIY repairs because the most affordable policy will have a $1,000 deductible and most coach repairs will be less than that. Engine repairs are really the only thing to policies cover. You are better off doing the coach repairs your self and not filing a claim, UNLESS you let several small items build up and then file one claim for all the repairs.


Get the DP of choice...buy the insurance and happy trails.
( so you can stop worrying about it )
Not worried, just being prudent so that I plan properly.
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Old 09-14-2016, 12:37 PM   #51
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I know that and you know that, but the OP's question was in reference to unexpected DP costs. The big difference between a gas coach and a DP is primarily the engine. Hence, my comment.
Understood
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Old 09-14-2016, 04:27 PM   #52
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With all due deference Gordon Dewald...An actuary's job is to study the numbers and save the insurance company money. My job is to save me money. Insurance prevents that which is inherently bad, from ruining our lives. Even the boldest gambler hedges his bets somewhat.
Due deference noted. Just saying what he told me.

Not sure about saving the insurance company money. More like setting a rate so the company makes money.

Actuary: job description. Actuaries use statistical techniques and mathematical skills to assess the probability of an event and its financial consequences.
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:35 PM   #53
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I'm dealing with an unexpected repair at the moment. Pulled into a campground just west of Davenport, IA for what was supposed to be a simple "overnight" on Monday afternoon. Put down the hydraulic levelers and extended all the slides with no problems. Tuesday afternoon when I went to retract the levelers and close the slides - all things hydraulic did not work.

Coachnet get a mobile tech out to us late this morning - who was able to troubleshoot the issue to a dead hydraulic pump. Parts are on order with expedited shipping - so with any luck, they'll be delivered tomorrow (Friday morning at the latest). Once the parts are on site - we're looking at 30-45 minutes to install. If we're able to roll tomorrow - we'll be able to stick to our plans to spend the weekend with old friends in the Denver area. If we can't roll until Friday - we'll be a day late.

Once again - props to Coachnet for sending us competent service techs who were able to quickly isolate and diagnose the problem.
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Old 09-14-2016, 09:27 PM   #54
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Hope you aren't being ripped off. It would be more likely that a switch, relay, or bad connection would be the issue when it goes down all at once like that.

Make sure you hang on to that original pump/motor. The motors are generally easy and economical to rebuild.
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:24 PM   #55
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None. Nothing 'unexpected'.

Cheers
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Old 09-15-2016, 06:28 AM   #56
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Hope you aren't being ripped off. It would be more likely that a switch, relay, or bad connection would be the issue when it goes down all at once like that.

Make sure you hang on to that original pump/motor. The motors are generally easy and economical to rebuild.
No, not being ripped off ... the troubleshooting process bypassed everything along the electrical path by taking power straight off the battery terminals and applying it directly to the solenoid that controls the engagement of the hydraulic pump motor. The solenoid tested good - pump did nothing. Once the pump and solenoid was removed, we took the solenoid out of the picture and applied power directly to the motor. It was dead as Kelsey's nuts.

Being that the diagnosis was performed by a mobile tech at our campground site - I watched the entire process. There were no "back in the shop" shenanigans.

A comment the tech made has me wondering if there might have been an indication of an impending failure. The "Low Voltage" indicator light on the LCI Hydraulic Leveling control panel has lit up every time I've used the hydraulic levelers since the day I purchased the coach (18 months ago). The tech said that light typically comes on if/when the levelers are operated when the coach engine is not running. In my case, the light stays lit when the levelers are operated when the coach engine IS running. I'll be interested to see whether that light goes out once the new motor is installed. It may turn out that this failure wasn't quite as "sudden" as I initially thought it was.
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