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Old 05-13-2016, 01:22 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by dix39 View Post
I checked my manual and .001-.005 is the correct adjustment for my 93 P30. The "as I remember" adjustment stated earlier of .003-.007 is incorrect.

Sorry for trusting the sometimes poor memory.

Steve
I never trust my memory on critical items like bearings. Repacked my p30 bearings yesterday for about the ninth time and had to look up end play just to make sure. Still the original Timken bearings with about 200k miles, so with good maintenance those grease packed bearings perform very well. Reason for repack was I finally replaced the original rotors which have never been turned. I decided to buy new because one rotor was only .017 over minimum thickness. Simply wore away from friction.
Noticed the hubs and rotors were made by the Budd company which has been a supplier to the rail transportation industry and others since 1912. Budd designed the first all steel automobile body, but is most famous for their stainless steel rail streamliner passenger trains with vista domes. Budd and Timken bearings are certainly not junk that auto mfrs are continually accused of using.
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Old 05-14-2016, 12:28 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Steady_Rest View Post
I never trust my memory on critical items like bearings. Repacked my p30 bearings yesterday for about the ninth time and had to look up end play just to make sure. Still the original Timken bearings with about 200k miles, so with good maintenance those grease packed bearings perform very well.
I couldn't agree more.

I always buy a factory shop manual for that particular year vehicle when I get one, and always consult it when I'm doing technical work (or when I get in trouble). :-))

Wheel bearings will last a long time when cared for. I always check them for temp right after after stopping following a long run when traveling. Significantly increased temp is a good indicator of a failing bearing.

Steve
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Old 05-19-2016, 06:44 AM   #17
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Arrow Specifications

I have found finding and following the manufacturers instructions to be very helpful, having maintained mechanical equipment most of my life.

Here are two good resources for wheel bearings:

Proper Wheel Bearing Setting Recommendations

http://www.timken.com/en-us/solution...procedures.pdf

TOM
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Old 05-19-2016, 02:12 PM   #18
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It looks like, according to the second link, that .001 to .005 would be acceptable for most applications. Thanks for posting it.

How did you come up with oldmansax? Just curious, I've been trying to learn to play one of these things for several years and I'm 77.

Steve
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Old 05-19-2016, 04:01 PM   #19
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Talking

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How did you come up with oldmansax? Just curious, I've been trying to learn to play one of these things for several years and I'm 77. Steve
I'm an Old Man, (not as old as you but getting there) and I used to play the Sax. I haven't played in probably 20 years. Wore my original horn out and never bought another one.

Oldmansax was not taken so I took it! LOL!

TOM
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Old 05-19-2016, 04:07 PM   #20
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Thanks for the response.

You should get another one, I'm having a lot of fun with mine.

Oldmansax, it's a good name.

Steve
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Old 05-23-2016, 03:14 PM   #21
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Well,
My apologies for incorrect information. I have never left any play in any wheel bearings, ever. And, have never had any issues with them in hundreds of thousands of miles, on many, many vehicles, trucks, motor homes and more. I must say, trying to feel .001 play, in just about anything is pretty tough, much less a 50 lb. drum/hub. Works for me.
Scott
Like FIRE UP, I have always run a slight preload on tapered bearings. I am always amazed at the specs that call for clearance on tapered bearings. If tapered bearings are allowed to bang back and forth, they beat themselves to death. Just think how much preload is run on pinion bearings, and they last.
Many years ago I had a bearing engineer suggest that ALL tapered bearings need to run loaded.

Richard
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Old 05-24-2016, 12:11 AM   #22
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Like FIRE UP, I have always run a slight preload on tapered bearings. I am always amazed at the specs that call for clearance on tapered bearings. If tapered bearings are allowed to bang back and forth, they beat themselves to death. Just think how much preload is run on pinion bearings, and they last.
Many years ago I had a bearing engineer suggest that ALL tapered bearings need to run loaded.

Richard
Well, that engineer appears to be in conflict with Timken according to my interpretation of the link oldmansax previously posted. Unless I am mistaken their recommendation for all tapered roller wheel bearings is .001 to .005. That is also the factory recommended setting for my Chevrolet P30 MH.

I have always followed the manufacturers recommendations and it has always worked for me. I've been doing this since I was a teenager and I am 77 now. I have never had a wheel bearing failure on the road.

Several months ago I took the MH to a Peterbuilt shop for an alignment. The young man doing the alignment called me back into the shop to explain that the wheel bearings were too loose and probably damaged because he could remove the spindle nut with his fingers. I didn't have a manual yet so I told him to just replace the wheel and I would take care of it later. When I got the manual I learned that at the end of a procedure the spindle nut was tightened finger tight and backed off to the first cotter pin hole. I'm thinking that would make it finger tight. That is why I don't trust shops to work on my vehicles. The alignment cost $215.00 and because of the mechanics lack of knowledge about the wheel bearings I will probably have the alignment checked again to make certain it is correct before starting our 8k mile trip with new tires.

Just my 2c.

Steve
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Old 05-25-2016, 04:33 AM   #23
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At least with endplay you can accurately measure it. How would you measure preload accurately without special tools. Too much preload and lubrication problems would occur.
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:30 PM   #24
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The pinion preload for the Dana 70 rear diff in my old Dodge Cummins was set by checking it with an inch/pound torque wrench. The correct preload required 10-20 in/lb to turn it.

I'm thinking there must be some heat expansion factors involved in both the pinion and wheel bearing adjustments, but I don't know that.

Another 2c.

Steve
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