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Old 03-28-2015, 06:09 AM   #1
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Wrapping intercooler tubing

Curious if anyone has ever heat wrapped their Intercooler Tubing? I have done many upgrades to my old M11 Cummins that have helped efficiency but running out of ideas. (ya I like to tinker) I have searched the internet about the topic and there are a lot of mixed reviews. Some say wrap only the tube from the intercooler to the intake of the engine to keep the charged air cooler (makes sense on my Monaco since this tube is about 6ft long). They say leave the tube from the turbo before the intercooler (since this air will be cooled as it goes through the intercooler) Colder air at the intake would only mean a more efficient running Cummins?

Comments ??
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Old 03-28-2015, 07:55 AM   #2
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It only makes sense if the charge air, coming out of the intercooler, is cooler then the ambient air, around the pipe.

You may want to check that.
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Old 03-28-2015, 08:03 AM   #3
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I think you will get a very marginal benefit. You're running ~1300cfm through a 4" pipe? How long is each cubic foot in an environment to get warmer?
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:51 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coma View Post
I think you will get a very marginal benefit. You're running ~1300cfm through a 4" pipe? How long is each cubic foot in an environment to get warmer?

Interesting. Didn't really think of the air speed through the Intercooler.
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:54 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post
It only makes sense if the charge air, coming out of the intercooler, is cooler then the ambient air, around the pipe.

You may want to check that.

Not sure what the temp difference would be but I would think with the engine temp at 200 degrees (or so) the intercooler outlet temp should be at or close to outside air temp. ?

joe
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Old 03-28-2015, 12:45 PM   #6
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That 200 degrees is what the water temp is, not the exhaust temp that is going through the intercooler.


Wrapping the outlet pipe will certainly not hurt anything but you may not notice any measurable difference. I would be curious to see what you discover.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:10 PM   #7
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Air coming out of the turbo can be over 300 degrees, before the intercooler , at high boost pressures.
I did read something about getting cooler air into the turbo, creating higher boost pressures coming out.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:56 PM   #8
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Not a mechanic but I thought an intercooler cooled the incoming air to make it denser.I would think heating it would defeat the whole thing.
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Old 03-28-2015, 02:18 PM   #9
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The first thing would be to see what the air temp is coming into the intake manifold.
If the temp is running some where between 75 and under 105 degrees on a pull you
will not see much of a effect in wrapping the pipe from the CAC to the intake manifold.
Making sure the outside of the CAC is clean and has good air flow would be the first place to start.
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Old 03-28-2015, 03:31 PM   #10
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bldrbob,
The air filtered, air, pulled into the turbo, gets heated in the turbo, by compression and heat transfer , from the hot, exhaust side, of the turbo.

It then moves thru the intercooler, before going into the intake manifold.
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Old 03-28-2015, 03:39 PM   #11
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The benefit would be anecdotal at best. You made a mod so your mind must see a benefit.

Build a intercooler feed pipe that is wrapped with an outer pipe that carries radiator coolant. That will give you awesome heat drop.
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Old 03-28-2015, 03:54 PM   #12
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My thought, is that the air system on a diesel is made out of aluminum, piping and the CAC, due to the rapid heat transfer from this material. Wrapping or insulating would make for heat retention. You would be trying to defeat the systems purpose, by design/function.
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Old 03-28-2015, 07:21 PM   #13
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Cummins engine computers, at least the ISL, only looks at Intake Manifold Temp. I run the SliverLeaf VMSpc program and at cruise speed, the temp is about 115 -125 degrees. When climbing, it goes to about 140 - 150 degrees. I'm guessing the air temp in the engine compartment is around 100 -125 on a cool day and warmer on a hot day. So, it seems that wrapping the CAC outlet pipe wouldn't make much difference either way.
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Old 03-28-2015, 07:33 PM   #14
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From cummins:

Maximum allowable air temperature rise over ambient at intake manifold 16.7 C [30 F]

Intake Manifold Air Temperature Warning Limit 74C [165F]

Intake Manifold Air Temperature Shutdown limit 76.7C [170F]

Diesel engines are best suited for air temperatures between 60 and 90F [15 and 32C]. Engines can withstand temperatures below or above this range, but their efficiency drops.

Intake Air That Is Too Hot

Engine horsepower fails about 1% for each 10 degrees of intake air temperature rise above 90F [32C].

An engine rated at 250 horsepower will develop only 240 horsepower when the intake air temperature is 130F [54C] with the same fuel delivery.

Air That Is Too Cold

Cummins Diesels are rated on the basis of intake air at 85F [29C] temperature, but in most localities engines operate part of the time at temperatures of freezing or below. A drop of 60 degrees in intake air temperature results in a 160-degree drop in compression temperature.
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