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Old 11-15-2019, 12:51 PM   #1
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Class B / B+ or C Chassis RVís

Class B / B+ or C Chassis RVís



Hello B Forum Users - Seems that lately there been a lot of interest in B+ RVs - Many manufactures who offer both B & B+ models, have seen the market moving towards B+ RVís, since they offer the same ease of driving, yet offer many living advantages over a smaller Class B RV.



While the Pencil-Pushers at RVIA - And other organizations refuse to acknowledge there is such a thing as a B+, I assure you they are alive and well and becoming a major player in the RV market. Surely, a Class B+ motorhome has a distinct difference from class C, since most Cís are built on heavy duty E350-450 van and truck chassis with a eight foot rear axle track. In my best summation, the biggest advantage of a B+ RV is; it handles better than a Class C RV and offers more livability and storage over a Class B.






As the images above show - When I put my two vans nose to nose, both the B and B+ models are very similar in design. Most important, the B+ offers more livability thanks to its dedicated sleeping arrangement, walk in shower, larger living quarters, plus allows for higher water capacity.



Another advantage is storage - a major disadvantage of a B is is they offer little to no space for storage, where some B+ models such as my LTV shown offers more storage than some smaller class C or A models.
While Iíll be the first to admit, Class B vans have their own following and surely not every owner uses his van for camping. However, if camping is one of your uses, a B+ RV might be an option since it can be used as a daily driver for work or used as a second vehicle for entertaining, shopping or even going to a local park for the day.






I happen to own both - A Midwest Sprinter 4x4 as well as a LTV B+. The Midwest conversion retains the great look of a stock fan, it still offers the convenience of being used as a camper as well. Since many B and B+ models are built on on the same chassis, they handle very similar.
The only exception when it comes to chassis handling, is the Ford Transit chassis has an edge in stability over the Sprinter since it incorporates a low slung chassis design, low profile tires, and slightly wider rear axle track.



While Iím certainly not insinuating anyone should dump their B for a B+, what I am saying is; if your plans include some serious camping, a class B+ RV will offer the Bís ease of driving, yet the livability of a type C RV.

When it comes to Appearance - as these images show, a B+ RV looks as sharp and in some cases even better than a standard van, yet they retain a traditional van look with its slender width and low overall height.



Some larger B+ RVs - Built on Sprinter and Transit ďCab and ChassisĒ such a Winnebago View or Tiffin Wayfarer with their tall over-head sleeper, end up entirely too tall and top heavy for these smaller van chassis. Their narrow rear axle track results in poor handling when it comes to roll moment which can be a safety hazard.

Even though these RVís such are considered Type C RVís, they do not offer a ďRealĒ Type C heavy duty chassis such as Fordís hefty E 350-450 chassis, with good load capacity and a 8 foot rear axle track.



The truth of the matter is - Instead of building these RVs on heavier Ford and Ram chassis, manufactures instead use lighter weight van chassis to save cost, resulting in the RV being overloaded in weight, height and width. In fact, these RVs are so close to maximum weight, if you were to add the weight of a few passengers, you would be over gross weight. This is the primary reason many B+ RVs do not offer seat belts on the rear seating, since it would push the weight over the limit.

If happen to be looking for a ďRealĒ Type C motorhome - I would recommend nothing less than a Ford or Ram truck chassis with a good diesel engine. At Hershey, I found these heavy duty Type C units selling for only $135K with a Powerstroke or Cummins engine, which is pretty much the same money as some B or B+ models.



Ultimately only each owner - Will determine which chassis will work best for them. If youíre considering a new van for camping and concerned about the room, a B+ might be a good choice since it offers extra convenience when camping, plus can still be used as a second vehicle.

If you happen to be Shopping - For a new B or B+ RV, be extra careful since the pricing of RVís are now off the scale. Possible the biggest rip-off of any B+ RV made, is hands down the Airstream Atlas, this B+ RV is built on a $35K Sprinter chassis, retails for $250K + and sells for an insane price of $200,000 - yet almost identical as other B+ RVís selling for half the price.

Regards - Mike Mas





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Old 11-15-2019, 01:26 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idleup View Post
Class B / B+ or C Chassis RVís



Hello B Forum Users - Seems that lately there been a lot of interest in B+ RVs - Many manufactures who offer both B & B+ models, have seen the market moving towards B+ RVís, since they offer the same ease of driving, yet offer many living advantages over a smaller Class B RV.



While the Pencil-Pushers at RVIA - And other organizations refuse to acknowledge there is such a thing as a B+, I assure you they are alive and well and becoming a major player in the RV market. Surely, a Class B+ motorhome has a distinct difference from class C, since most Cís are built on heavy duty E350-450 van and truck chassis with a eight foot rear axle track. In my best summation, the biggest advantage of a B+ RV is; it handles better than a Class C RV and offers more livability and storage over a Class B.






As the images above show - When I put my two vans nose to nose, both the B and B+ models are very similar in design. Most important, the B+ offers more livability thanks to its dedicated sleeping arrangement, walk in shower, larger living quarters, plus allows for higher water capacity.



Another advantage is storage - a major disadvantage of a B is is they offer little to no space for storage, where some B+ models such as my LTV shown offers more storage than some smaller class C or A models.
While Iíll be the first to admit, Class B vans have their own following and surely not every owner uses his van for camping. However, if camping is one of your uses, a B+ RV might be an option since it can be used as a daily driver for work or used as a second vehicle for entertaining, shopping or even going to a local park for the day.






I happen to own both - A Midwest Sprinter 4x4 as well as a LTV B+. The Midwest conversion retains the great look of a stock fan, it still offers the convenience of being used as a camper as well. Since many B and B+ models are built on on the same chassis, they handle very similar.
The only exception when it comes to chassis handling, is the Ford Transit chassis has an edge in stability over the Sprinter since it incorporates a low slung chassis design, low profile tires, and slightly wider rear axle track.



While Iím certainly not insinuating anyone should dump their B for a B+, what I am saying is; if your plans include some serious camping, a class B+ RV will offer the Bís ease of driving, yet the livability of a type C RV.

When it comes to Appearance - as these images show, a B+ RV looks as sharp and in some cases even better than a standard van, yet they retain a traditional van look with its slender width and low overall height.



Some larger B+ RVs - Built on Sprinter and Transit ďCab and ChassisĒ such a Winnebago View or Tiffin Wayfarer with their tall over-head sleeper, end up entirely too tall and top heavy for these smaller van chassis. Their narrow rear axle track results in poor handling when it comes to roll moment which can be a safety hazard.

Even though these RVís such are considered Type C RVís, they do not offer a ďRealĒ Type C heavy duty chassis such as Fordís hefty E 350-450 chassis, with good load capacity and a 8 foot rear axle track.



The truth of the matter is - Instead of building these RVs on heavier Ford and Ram chassis, manufactures instead use lighter weight van chassis to save cost, resulting in the RV being overloaded in weight, height and width. In fact, these RVs are so close to maximum weight, if you were to add the weight of a few passengers, you would be over gross weight. This is the primary reason many B+ RVs do not offer seat belts on the rear seating, since it would push the weight over the limit.

If happen to be looking for a ďRealĒ Type C motorhome - I would recommend nothing less than a Ford or Ram truck chassis with a good diesel engine. At Hershey, I found these heavy duty Type C units selling for only $135K with a Powerstroke or Cummins engine, which is pretty much the same money as some B or B+ models.



Ultimately only each owner - Will determine which chassis will work best for them. If youíre considering a new van for camping and concerned about the room, a B+ might be a good choice since it offers extra convenience when camping, plus can still be used as a second vehicle.

If you happen to be Shopping - For a new B or B+ RV, be extra careful since the pricing of RVís are now off the scale. Possible the biggest rip-off of any B+ RV made, is hands down the Airstream Atlas, this B+ RV is built on a $35K Sprinter chassis, retails for $250K + and sells for an insane price of $200,000 - yet almost identical as other B+ RVís selling for half the price.

Regards - Mike Mas





As a point of information, there are many Class B + ( really Class C's , on a Mercedes Benz Sprinter platform with a one ton chassis....

The only thing is, when it comes to the Department of Motor Vehicles, you'll find out that they register a Class B+ as a Class C.

There's no official Class B+.... I know they are popular for the extra space inside. If that's what you want, go ahead and get one.

I hope you take it on a test drive around town and on the freeway at highway speeds to see how it feels. The amount of wind drag and tail wagging when turning corners is very real. Just be aware of it. And, if you still want it enjoy the extra space. We almost purchased one.

The Class B RV I ultimately chose fits better in our driveway.

Good luck.
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Old 11-15-2019, 01:48 PM   #3
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Thanks for the reply however I don't feel read the article - I presently own both RV's now, and I assure you there is no wondering or wagging that you mention. I recommend that perhaps you take a B+ for a ride you'll be pleasantly surprised to find out it not only drives as good as a B RV, its considerable more livable.


Mike
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Old 11-15-2019, 04:45 PM   #4
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Great write up, one of the best I have seen on the B, B+, C comparison.
I have a 2017 RoadTrek, CS Adventurous 4x4 XL. Take if from me my wife can fill that XL back up with more stuff than you can imagine. I have more storage space in that back of that XL then I do in my 2019 LTV FX.

We enjoy both RV's and use them at different times. The 2019 LTV on the 2019 Mercedes chassis handles like a dream. I love the 7 speed transmission and the 17 MPG we get. The Steering and driving of the 2019 is a pleasure. I have been in heavy winds and open roads and have never had a problem.
I think people have to test drive or better yet rent and take a week and see what works best for them. RV's are very much an extension of your home and lifestyle.

Once you get one you have to outfit it the way you want and the way it will make it the most comfortable for your traveling and living. Even when it is for a weekend, week long or travel across the country. Make it the way you best enjoy life traveling.

Remember there a lot of advantages of all three mentioned. Just get the one you think will work best for you. If you are not a 110% sure it will work for you, you then have to buy used to save a lot of money. That way if you are not happy you won't feel bad selling and moving to something else.
My wife and I do miss our Entegra Class A at times, but feel the B+ has made the transition not so bad.

If you are looking and thinking of buying and getting into the RV world, good luck. Make sure whatever you buy you are willing to work on the RV at times and have patients when its at the dealers. When you get on to the Dealers RV lot remember be ready to WALK AWAY. There are a lot of good deals out there so buyer beware and compare, compare, compare.

Steve
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Old 11-15-2019, 05:11 PM   #5
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A "B+" is also known as a "Unicorn". Not to be confused with the class/type C motorhome known as the "Leprechaun", which actually does exist.
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Old 11-15-2019, 05:27 PM   #6
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Hey guys thanks for the reply's and the kind words - I agree, each owner has their own needs which determine which RV is best for them.

All models regardless of the type offer unique advantages.

Thanks Mike
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Old 11-16-2019, 08:50 AM   #7
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We love our B+, "unicorn" or otherwise!

Forget whether the terminology is recognized by RVIA or whoever ... you won't see "diesel pusher" or "Super C" recognized as separate classes either, but there are obviously "sub-classes" within the official "class" or "type" categories, and RVers know what they are.

By the way, some B+ coaches, including mine, are built on the E450 platform. That drove our choice, because we wanted the smaller size, no cab overhang like in most C's, but plenty of weight carrying and towing capacity. We got it all in our Coach House Platinum.
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Old 11-16-2019, 10:45 AM   #8
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"diesel pusher" and "Super C" are slang terms specifically used to refer to common types of Class A motorhomes or Class C motorhomes. No one is trying to make them into a separate class unto themselves. They're generally accpeted subsets of the larger groups.
People who use B+ are actually trying to convince themselves that their purchase "isn't a class C without the overhang, it's a more mature class B" by creating a new class of motorhome, wedged in between the other two, aka "unicorns".
Call it whatever you want. It's a class C by industry definition.
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Old 11-16-2019, 12:09 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterbagoal View Post
"diesel pusher" and "Super C" are slang terms specifically used to refer to common types of Class A motorhomes or Class C motorhomes. No one is trying to make them into a separate class unto themselves. They're generally accpeted subsets of the larger groups.
People who use B+ are actually trying to convince themselves that their purchase "isn't a class C without the overhang, it's a more mature class B" by creating a new class of motorhome, wedged in between the other two, aka "unicorns".
Call it whatever you want. It's a class C by industry definition.

Thanks for the reply however there certainly needs to be different classes, the RV market has changed in past years.

There is a major difference between a Class B+ and class C RV. The B+ is built on a smaller lighter and more narrow Sprinter and Transit van chassis - while a true Class C is built on a heavy duty van chassis like a E350-450 or a F series or Ram truck chassis with a wider 8 ft rear track, big V10 gas or diesel Powerstoke or Cummins engines. These chassis are in a different class of the lighter Sprinter or Transit diesel engines and smaller transmissions. Therefore they are two different animals.

When comparing a Class C to a Super C there is also a world of difference.

A Class C is primarily built on heavy duty van or pickup chassis like a E350-450 or truck chassis, where a Super C is a totally different category using an over the road Freightliner M2 or Cascadia truck chassis with massive Allison transmissions using large Cummins or Detroit heavy engines with massive power of 1850 lbs of torque and 550 hp.

There needs to be different classes to properly identify these RV's.

Regards - Mike
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Old 11-16-2019, 12:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterbagoal View Post
"diesel pusher" and "Super C" are slang terms specifically used to refer to common types of Class A motorhomes or Class C motorhomes. No one is trying to make them into a separate class unto themselves. They're generally accpeted subsets of the larger groups.
People who use B+ are actually trying to convince themselves that their purchase "isn't a class C without the overhang, it's a more mature class B" by creating a new class of motorhome, wedged in between the other two, aka "unicorns".
Call it whatever you want. It's a class C by industry definition.
I never understand why you seem to care so much what other people call their coaches. If you don't want to use the term "Class B+," don't. Those of us who want to, will. And you're quite wrong about why we (or at least I) call them that. The manufacturer of my coach calls it a B+, as do lots of other people. I'm not trying to convince myself or anyone else of anything. I didn't buy it because of what it was called, I bought it because it was what I wanted.
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Old 11-16-2019, 01:56 PM   #11
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Mike, don't worry about what others think... good advice

Quote:
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Thanks for the reply however there certainly needs to be different classes, the RV market has changed in past years.

There is a major difference between a Class B+ and class C RV. The B+ is built on a smaller lighter and more narrow Sprinter and Transit van chassis - while a true Class C is built on a heavy duty van chassis like a E350-450 or a F series or Ram truck chassis with a wider 8 ft rear track, big V10 gas or diesel Powerstoke or Cummins engines. These chassis are in a different class of the lighter Sprinter or Transit diesel engines and smaller transmissions. Therefore they are two different animals.

When comparing a Class C to a Super C there is also a world of difference.

A Class C is primarily built on heavy duty van or pickup chassis like a E350-450 or truck chassis, where a Super C is a totally different category using an over the road Freightliner M2 or Cascadia truck chassis with massive Allison transmissions using large Cummins or Detroit heavy engines with massive power of 1850 lbs of torque and 550 hp.

There needs to be different classes to properly identify these RV's.

Regards - Mike
Mike, be happy with what you chose.
I looked at all the classes of RVs.... drove two other Class B plus models....

I dismissed the Class A's... just too large....

Finally got a Class B RV with the dual wheels and tires... there's no weight capacity issues... just space issues....

As for handling.... the Sprinter does extremely well....I don't agree with the other people saying that the Transit handles better....

Actually, it was down to a Winnebago Fuze, Navion and my Roadtrek. . I chose the Roadtrek.....
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Old 11-16-2019, 04:41 PM   #12
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Mike, be happy with what you chose.
I looked at all the classes of RVs.... drove two other Class B plus models....

I dismissed the Class A's... just too large....

Finally got a Class B RV with the dual wheels and tires... there's no weight capacity issues... just space issues....

As for handling.... the Sprinter does extremely well....I don't agree with the other people saying that the Transit handles better....

Actually, it was down to a Winnebago Fuze, Navion and my Roadtrek. . I chose the Roadtrek.....

I agree with you 100%. I love my B Sprinter as well. Here's a link to a full review I recently completed on my Midwest conversion.

http://www.rotory.com/sprinter/midwest/

Each owner will seek a coach that meets their needs. I put this little article together to help new owners understand the B+ RV offers an option that handles like a van yet offers some additional living advantages.

Most important - I wanted to express the importance that larger RV bodies like the Winnabago View and others will offer not offer the great handling one would get with a B or B+ model.

Regards - Mike


By the way I like green finish on your rig!
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Old 11-16-2019, 08:45 PM   #13
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As a point of information, there are many Class B + ( really Class C's , on a Mercedes Benz Sprinter platform with a one ton chassis....

The only thing is, when it comes to the Department of Motor Vehicles, you'll find out that they register a Class B+ as a Class C.

There's no official Class B+.... .
B+ is just a marketing term.

B for completely OEM van-shelled unit. C for cab chassis with house built on the cutaway back part of the frame.
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Old 11-16-2019, 10:29 PM   #14
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Idleup, I have to ask, why do you have two class B's? (B and B+). Do you still have the Class A pictured too?

Does your LTV on the Ford chassis with the twin beds have the closet under the beds?

I have been looking at the LTV Unity with the rear twins and the rear lounge. Are you happy with the LTV product and service?

Thanks,
Safe travels,
Mark
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