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Old 12-14-2014, 08:26 AM   #15
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We put 30,000 miles on our Unity 24MB in 10 months. Only issues we had were very minor. A faulty warning light fixed by MB. A seatbelt warning light caused by a wire being sliced by the drivers seat, fixed by MB covered by LTV. Really our only complaint was the Pioneer Navigation system which in my opinion is unusable. We purchased a Garmin RV760LMT and never used the in-dash one again. We were getting between 16.5 and 17.5 MPG towing a Smart42 when we sold the unit a couple of months ago, as we want a unit with a fulltime walk around bed plus a fulltime dinette. Have yet to find anything that comes close although the new 2015.5 model does look promising. We do miss our LTV.
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Old 12-15-2014, 11:35 AM   #16
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I know our B+ had exposed tanks and we did get heated holding pads on them, but still in the winter we sometimes took it out for the day but not an overnight, kept it winterized. Are you guys saying you can use yours in the winter without winterizing in a B+? How do you deal with them not freezing.
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Old 12-15-2014, 11:41 AM   #17
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I think this is very personal. I really like the Pleasure-Way 24, but I feel closed in. Could also be a function of age. What I was able to do when I was younger, changes as I have grown older. For extended travel, there is a natural extension in length, but it really depends on your ability to compromise as well. My focus is on 34 to 36 feet, and now I have a wife with me and she has her thoughts as well.
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Old 12-20-2014, 08:14 PM   #18
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Steve,

We routinely spend as much as two months in ours. Bought a Winnebago View in 08/2005, then traded it for our 2012 Itasca Navion iQ in 02/2012. We make a "big" fall trip each fall, 6-8 weeks long, then to South Texas in Jan-Feb, usually 4-6 weeks. Many other smaller trips the rest of the year. At one point we lived in our View for 5 months while our house was being built.

By the way, I think rigs like Views and Navions are technically Class C's. . . I read the whole B+ thing is more of a marketing term. Not sure about all of that, perhaps someone who really knows can clarify.
If there is a bunk or some other sleeping arrangement (no matter the size) above the cab, its a 'C'. If there is only enclosed storage or space for entertainment systems, its a 'B+'.
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Old 12-21-2014, 05:17 AM   #19
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Winter in a class b+

No, the bunk is incidental and does not in itself distinguish between a Class B and C. A Class B unit uses a complete finished vehicle such as a van (or Sprinter van for example) that has had the interior modified to add living quarters, but still uses the original factory van body. A Class C unit is ordered as a cab and chassis unit from vehicle manufacturer (no body is supplied) and the RV manufacturer adds a separate RV body (that may or may not include a bunk, that is beside the point.)

For example a View or Navion is a Class C RV as Winnebago orders a Sprinter cab and chassis model from Mercedes and adds their own body (and again, whether there happens to be an over-cab bunk or not is irrelevant.) A Class B RV would use a full van model and modifies only the interior.

What then is a B+ you ask? That is purely a marketing term so it can mean anything the manufacturer wants I guess, but... if it is built with an add-on body (such as a Pleasureway Pursuit or most Unity LTV models for example) then it is really a Class C.
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Old 12-21-2014, 09:20 AM   #20
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If there is a bunk or some other sleeping arrangement (no matter the size) above the cab, its a 'C'. If there is only enclosed storage or space for entertainment systems, its a 'B+'.
Exactly.
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Old 12-21-2014, 09:28 AM   #21
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No, the bunk is incidental and does not in itself distinguish between a Class B and C. A Class B unit uses a complete finished vehicle such as a van (or Sprinter van for example) that has had the interior modified to add living quarters, but still uses the original factory van body. A Class C unit is ordered as a cab and chassis unit from vehicle manufacturer (no body is supplied) and the RV manufacturer adds a separate RV body (that may or may not include a bunk, that is beside the point.)

For example a View or Navion is a Class C RV as Winnebago orders a Sprinter cab and chassis model from Mercedes and adds their own body (and again, whether there happens to be an over-cab bunk or not is irrelevant.) A Class B RV would use a full van model and modifies only the interior.

What then is a B+ you ask? That is purely a marketing term so it can mean anything the manufacturer wants I guess, but... if it is built with an add-on body (such as a Pleasureway Pursuit or most Unity LTV models for example) then it is really a Class C.
It is very important to differentiate between a B+ and a regular C because they are different. Yes, it is technically a form of a C. I had a B+, said it right on it, it was lower in height, had no overhead bunk and more aerodynamic, getting 12 mpg while the C's the same length with the same motor, a V10, were getting 8 mpg. So they are different. So that makes it very important to consumers to know the difference between a regular C and a B+, so I will fight the term to the death. I don't like regular C's, have no interest in them. As the industry changed over the years, the lines get blurred even more. There is a new B+ motorhome out right now by EverGreen that is very interesting to people looking for a B, a smaller C or a B+ as it is even smaller than a regular B+. Motorhome Magazine January issue has it listed as a B.
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Old 12-21-2014, 09:41 AM   #22
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No, the bunk is incidental and does not in itself distinguish between a Class B and C. A Class B unit uses a complete finished vehicle such as a van (or Sprinter van for example) that has had the interior modified to add living quarters, but still uses the original factory van body. A Class C unit is ordered as a cab and chassis unit from vehicle manufacturer (no body is supplied) and the RV manufacturer adds a separate RV body (that may or may not include a bunk, that is beside the point.)

For example a View or Navion is a Class C RV as Winnebago orders a Sprinter cab and chassis model from Mercedes and adds their own body (and again, whether there happens to be an over-cab bunk or not is irrelevant.) A Class B RV would use a full van model and modifies only the interior.

What then is a B+ you ask? That is purely a marketing term so it can mean anything the manufacturer wants I guess, but... if it is built with an add-on body (such as a Pleasureway Pursuit or most Unity LTV models for example) then it is really a Class C.
A B+ is a form of a C but is different. I had a B+, said it right on it, it was lower in height, had no overhead bunk and got 12 mpg while the C's the same length with the same motor, a V10, were getting 8 mpg. So they are different. It is important to consumers to know the difference between a regular C and a B+ so I will fight the term to the death. As the industry changed over the years, the lines got blurred even more. There is a new B+ motorhome out right now by EverGreen that is very interesting to people looking for a B, a smaller C or a B+ as it is even smaller than a regular B+ and closer to a B. Motorhome Magazine January issue has it listed as a B. Coachmen Mercedes Prism B+ 24J is lower in height without a bunk, and their 2150 C version is slightly taller, same floor plan, overhead bunk, slightly more storage outside. The 24J is a B+ form of a C, the 2150 is a C. Don't you think it's important to consumers to know the difference? Winnebago same thing. Both can technically be called C's but are different.
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Old 12-21-2014, 01:58 PM   #23
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Winter in a class b+

Again, there is no formal definition for a 'B+', it is purely a subjective/marketing phrase. A bunk or the height of the vehicle, etc., has nothing to do with the class of vehicle, either it is built within a factory van body (and is a Class B) or on a cab and chassis (and is a Class C). An example is the Pleasureway Pursuit, the manufacturer calls it a B+ (even if it is ordered with an overhead bunk) but the model consists of a custom RV body on a Ford chassis and is clearly a Class C. The View/Navion is also sometimes referred to a B+, but it is also really a small Class C, whether it has a bunk or not.

So if any owner or manufacturer wants to call their small C or large B a 'B+' then that's fine, but there is no objective basis for the term.
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:28 AM   #24
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Again, there is no formal definition for a 'B+', it is purely a subjective/marketing phrase. A bunk or the height of the vehicle, etc., has nothing to do with the class of vehicle, either it is built within a factory van body (and is a Class B) or on a cab and chassis (and is a Class C). An example is the Pleasureway Pursuit, the manufacturer calls it a B+ (even if it is ordered with an overhead bunk) but the model consists of a custom RV body on a Ford chassis and is clearly a Class C. The View/Navion is also sometimes referred to a B+, but it is also really a small Class C, whether it has a bunk or not.

So if any owner or manufacturer wants to call their small C or large B a 'B+' then that's fine, but there is no objective basis for the term.
Just to be clear, the Pursuit does not have an overhang over the front, they put a very very small bunk in if you want a bunk instead of a TV, still shaped like the B+. A C has a large overhang, which typically contains a bunk, the Pursuit is shaped still as a B+ with or without the bunk. It is not the bed overhead but the shape of the unit. Everything is a marketing term. It doesn't matter why, how, they exist, they are real, they are different. There is an objective basis for that term. A company that still makes both, Nexxus, has a C and a B+ and they clearly call them that to differentiate. It is important to consumers.
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:50 AM   #25
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Class C Motorhomes | Class B+ Motorhomes | Manufacturer | Used RV

And to bring back on topic of winter RV'ing the MB Forest River Solera has an artic package, their discharge valves are even in an enclosed area. We were looking at that one and RV Direct has a great price on them. In the past some of the B+ the tanks, etc., were exposed, we had to add heated pads added to ours, but would only do an occasional overnight in the winter.
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