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Old 01-15-2019, 10:00 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDrider View Post
We have been using the TST brand monitoring system for about the last 4 years on our motorhome and have had absolutely no issues with it so far.
I opted to NOT have the flow through unit's and have found that I have to mess with the air pressure so few times that it's no big deal to just take them off to add air, oh by the way I took off the anti-tamper ring so it's just twist off by finger, no tool needed.
I guess the only issue I did have was that because we are in a 42' motorhome we would lose the signal from he passenger side rear tire on the toad now and again (not always) so a repeater was need to fix the issue.
I plan to take this system with us and use it on the NH when we get it.

The TST does not require the tires to be rotating, I too like to turn on the system on travel day mornings and know what's going on with them before I ever start the day.
For the first couple months I would still go out and check the pressure with my hand held to make sure things were working right but after a short while I learned to just trust them.
For the record we have never had a tire issue while going down the road so I can't report on how fast they are but we did have a leaky valve stem one time and it caught the low pressure at start up.
Besides the normal reasons to rotate tires, on a three axle fifth wheel, rotation is very necessary! The front and back tires rotate at differential rates. However, the middle axle . . . the middle tires . . . are dragged sideways across whatever road material there is underneath them. One can extend the life of the tires and improve their safety factor by rotating them such that the same tire is not being dragged sideways across a frictional surface.

Just my two cents,
Ron
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Old 01-16-2019, 06:59 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geo-gypsy View Post
Besides the normal reasons to rotate tires, on a three axle fifth wheel, rotation is very necessary! The front and back tires rotate at differential rates. However, the middle axle . . . the middle tires . . . are dragged sideways across whatever road material there is underneath them. One can extend the life of the tires and improve their safety factor by rotating them such that the same tire is not being dragged sideways across a frictional surface.

Just my two cents,
Ron
Oh, when I said that the TST system does not require the tires to be rotating I meant rolling down the road to get a reading. I thought someone mentioned that on their system the tires had to me moving to get a reading. I fully agree and understand the importance of "rotating tires" for better wear and life.
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Old 01-17-2019, 12:30 AM   #45
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I used Dynabeads. I chose them because they are ceramic, so very smooth and durable. Their website has a selector where you put in your tire size and it tells you how many ounces of beads to put in. Make sure you buy the little installation bottle, it works very well. Also you should buy the filtered shrader valves. The filter keeps the tiny beads from blowing out the valve when you let air out. They are only about $1 each. It took me about 5 minutes per tire to install the beads, and another 7 minutes to re-inflate the tire using my Porter Cable upright compressor. Easy DIY job, especially with BigFoot jacks to lift the tires off the ground.
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:37 PM   #46
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I have said sometimes that when you buy an RV you should plan that the RV is 1/3 of the cost, stuff you put in it 1/3 and upkeep is 1/3....

Many great ideas above. Some people will spend their first night or two camped in a Walmart parking lot making plenty of trips back into the store.

We have a 5th wheeler and a MH and both are outfitted with only a few items that float back and forth between them. When we prepare to leave on a trip we usually only load fresh food, a few clothing items and our electronics and then go. Every thing else lives on board full time.

Carry a Viair 450 in the MH and a CO2 system for air in the 5th.

About 30ft of sewer hose and assorted fittings. Clear 45 or 90, a rubber doughnut, a 3" & 4" sewer adapter rise. Home made. Sometimes you get a park where the sewer connection is in bottom a concrete basin and getting the 90 hose end to screw in does not work. These rises adds about 4" of height.

A dedicated hose to wash down sewer area, etc.

About 50 to 100' of fresh water line. Seen CGs where the water was 90' away. Also a brass wye for the hose. I have another wye at the RV city water connection that I use to bleed air from the hose prior to switching water to the RV. This keeps air from getting into the RV's water system. These hoses are rated for 300 PSI.

Carry a few spare hose washers, hose screen/washers and hose repair parts.

An adjustable hose sprayer for washing stuff down, including the dogs as required. On longer trips I'll carry a long handled washing brush, bucket, soap/wax and towels.

The water pressure regulator is a standard residential unit built into both RVs along with a whole house water filter. I can install different kinds of filter depending on local water issues.

A 30ft 50 extension cord, plus 50-30 & 30-20 amp adapters. In the 5th, the power cord screws onto the outside of the RV. So I also carry 50' of 30Amp cord. Its so much easier to handle, especially when its colder. Also that's all I need for the 5th's geny.

Have a built-in 50 Amp EMS.

A TPMS in both rigs. and a dash camera.

I carry most of the sewer hoses in custom made drawers. Used 5 x 5" PVC fence post and matching caps with a section of PVC rain gutter to create sliding drawers for the hoses and all of the various attachments. Works very well for me. Always use disposable gloves when handling any sewer component. Also have a small bottle of hand sanitizer and towel in a basement compartment.

Some people carry a flat plastic tray they put under the sewer connection when attaching/detaching the sewer lines. I added a second 3" sewer gate at the end of the line and don;t have any issues.

Folding chairs and outdoor rug. Also have a door matt used whenever its wet or small gravel in the CG.

All/most everything in basement is stored in large clear plastic tubs with hinged lids. That stack well into the spaces. Tools and some equipment are stored in heavier duty boxes.

Tools- that's another entire long list. I'm very much a DIY type and do all of my own service work. I understand that for some people who should never get close to a hammer should carry a credit card with large limit and have a good roadside assistance program. That's a good solution for some folks. Spare parts is another list that varies, but its smart to have at least every required fuse in your spares.

A folding table, grill, outdoor lights, etc.

Plus every thing else I can't think of sitting by a warm fire.

Most important is to get out have fun and be safe...
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Old 01-20-2019, 09:42 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rarebear.nm View Post
I have said sometimes that when you buy an RV you should plan that the RV is 1/3 of the cost, stuff you put in it 1/3 and upkeep is 1/3....

Many great ideas above. Some people will spend their first night or two camped in a Walmart parking lot making plenty of trips back into the store.

We have a 5th wheeler and a MH and both are outfitted with only a few items that float back and forth between them. When we prepare to leave on a trip we usually only load fresh food, a few clothing items and our electronics and then go. Every thing else lives on board full time.

Carry a Viair 450 in the MH and a CO2 system for air in the 5th.

About 30ft of sewer hose and assorted fittings. Clear 45 or 90, a rubber doughnut, a 3" & 4" sewer adapter rise. Home made. Sometimes you get a park where the sewer connection is in bottom a concrete basin and getting the 90 hose end to screw in does not work. These rises adds about 4" of height.

A dedicated hose to wash down sewer area, etc.

About 50 to 100' of fresh water line. Seen CGs where the water was 90' away. Also a brass wye for the hose. I have another wye at the RV city water connection that I use to bleed air from the hose prior to switching water to the RV. This keeps air from getting into the RV's water system. These hoses are rated for 300 PSI.

Carry a few spare hose washers, hose screen/washers and hose repair parts.

An adjustable hose sprayer for washing stuff down, including the dogs as required. On longer trips I'll carry a long handled washing brush, bucket, soap/wax and towels.

The water pressure regulator is a standard residential unit built into both RVs along with a whole house water filter. I can install different kinds of filter depending on local water issues.

A 30ft 50 extension cord, plus 50-30 & 30-20 amp adapters. In the 5th, the power cord screws onto the outside of the RV. So I also carry 50' of 30Amp cord. Its so much easier to handle, especially when its colder. Also that's all I need for the 5th's geny.

Have a built-in 50 Amp EMS.

A TPMS in both rigs. and a dash camera.

I carry most of the sewer hoses in custom made drawers. Used 5 x 5" PVC fence post and matching caps with a section of PVC rain gutter to create sliding drawers for the hoses and all of the various attachments. Works very well for me. Always use disposable gloves when handling any sewer component. Also have a small bottle of hand sanitizer and towel in a basement compartment.

Some people carry a flat plastic tray they put under the sewer connection when attaching/detaching the sewer lines. I added a second 3" sewer gate at the end of the line and don;t have any issues.

Folding chairs and outdoor rug. Also have a door matt used whenever its wet or small gravel in the CG.

All/most everything in basement is stored in large clear plastic tubs with hinged lids. That stack well into the spaces. Tools and some equipment are stored in heavier duty boxes.

Tools- that's another entire long list. I'm very much a DIY type and do all of my own service work. I understand that for some people who should never get close to a hammer should carry a credit card with large limit and have a good roadside assistance program. That's a good solution for some folks. Spare parts is another list that varies, but its smart to have at least every required fuse in your spares.

A folding table, grill, outdoor lights, etc.

Plus every thing else I can't think of sitting by a warm fire.

Most important is to get out have fun and be safe...
Wow..... Thank you for your ideas. Really good stuff. I appreciate you taking the time to be so thorough.
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Old 01-20-2019, 10:00 PM   #48
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Extra sewer hoses are handy, but storage can be a problem. A lot of the storage tubes require removal of the end fittings. Here is a link to one that does not: https://www.dwincorp.com/product/sup...le-super-tube/

This looks like a nice product but the product cost is only $56 including an extra mounting bracket and they want $42 to ship it UPS Ground!!! BS man!
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Old 01-20-2019, 11:07 PM   #49
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The costs of those prefabs is the reason I just make my own for a total of about $40-45. Plus they are full width of the RV. Maybe I'll snap a couple pics and post them tomorrow.

From Post 46:
I carry most of the sewer hoses in custom made drawers. Used 5 x 5" PVC fence post and matching caps with a section of PVC rain gutter to create sliding drawers for the hoses and all of the various attachments. Works very well for me.
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Old 01-21-2019, 12:53 AM   #50
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The best thing ever for the black and grey tanks is "Happy Campers". I have used this stuff for 14 yr full timing and never had any oder and have never cleaned or flushed my tanks. This stuff dissolves everything and keeps the tanks clean.

LOL, at people aversion to crap, for hundreds of centuries people used this stuff to build house and fertilized and made fires with bare handed. Now they wear surgical gloves yet will put most toxic of chemicals on their skins in the form of soaps, hair care and cosmetics. Advertisers sure have convinced people with an illogical fear of human waist to sell their products. They have people so germ phobic.

You think people will die from it.
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Old 01-21-2019, 06:24 AM   #51
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This is what you’re looking for.

All of your questions can be answered by reading my articles which are published on This Old Campsite campground recommendations reviews RV Shows RV Articles. ‘The ones written by Warren. There is one article, “Outfitting Your RV” which is probably exactly what you’re looking for. There’s another one called “RV Related Stuff I Like” which you will also find helpful.
In addition to these two articles there are 2 on safety which every RVer should read. Other articles cover water heater maintenance, rubber roof maintenance, the easy way to keep your rig looking good and others.
My email is included in the bio at the end of each article so please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
All the best!
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Old 01-21-2019, 06:48 AM   #52
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I would start out with the basics, water, sewage and of course a couple of lounge chair and maybe a small took box. Then take a week shake down trip for a week and make a list of things you wish you had and start from there. But be careful not to over fill your basement or internal storage capacity with nice to have items.
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Old 01-21-2019, 08:17 AM   #53
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billydee

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Rather than the valve, buy a clear elbow. They come in 45, 90 deg or straight depending on what suits your system. Much better investment.
Your rig will come with a cap that seals the valve to prevent any leaks that could occur with the valve closed.
The reason people have issues with build up in tanks is Poor Tank Maintenance. NEVER leave your dump valves open. That is the number one cause of a build up of solids in the tank. Always try to dump your tanks when at least half full or more.
Charge the black tank with a scoop of HC and a couple gallons of water. Don't be stingy using water to flush.
We've used Costco toilet paper and HC for years and have Never had a problem with our tanks.
Use the clear elbow in conjunction with the dump hose to indicate when the system is clear while dumping and using the city water Black Tank Flush.


https://www.amazon.com/Valterra-T102...r+elbow+for+rv

Don't be in a rush to buy all these gizmos. Get used to your rig first and then decide what you need and what is the Nice to Have stuff.
What is HC?
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Old 01-21-2019, 09:46 AM   #54
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happy camper = HC
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Old 01-21-2019, 03:36 PM   #55
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Dennis ... we're still fairly new at RVing ... you mention using HC in your black tank. What is HC?
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Old 01-21-2019, 08:47 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mudflat View Post
All of your questions can be answered by reading my articles which are published on This Old Campsite campground recommendations reviews RV Shows RV Articles. ‘The ones written by Warren. There is one article, “Outfitting Your RV” which is probably exactly what you’re looking for. There’s another one called “RV Related Stuff I Like” which you will also find helpful.
In addition to these two articles there are 2 on safety which every RVer should read. Other articles cover water heater maintenance, rubber roof maintenance, the easy way to keep your rig looking good and others.
My email is included in the bio at the end of each article so please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
All the best!
Great articles and extremely helpful and comprehensive information. Thank you.
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