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Old 01-11-2019, 06:57 AM   #85
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I carry a spare 22.5" wheel and tire weigh about 140lb in the back of my truck toad. I use a motorcycle ramp. I also carry it in my JK jeep fits in the back snug but it will go.
Lug nuts are 475 torque I use a torque multiplier 4 to 1 ratio
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Old 01-11-2019, 07:42 AM   #86
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Tire changing

As many other options on here back and forth mine is this. I wouldn’t not that I couldn’t, ive been on world of outlaws pit crews with sprint car rear and front tires and we changed them all night and even swap wheels and tires themselves. In the mud and crime and worked on cars and trucks my whole life not a big deal to change a tire!!!!!!
Get a good roadside policy !!!!!!!!
Ok you got a spare , big deal fix one and 4 hours down the road a second one goes now what your still stuck !!!!
And carry a jack really why if you have a good MH it has jacks built in , we call them automatic leveling system that you can do manually as well, I’ve done it many times at where coach is parked and get the bus off the ground no need for an extra 30lbs jack taking up valuable space and more weight . Just my one cent on the matter
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:38 AM   #87
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Why would you go 4 hours down the road to the next tire problem? Get your spare tire replaced at the next tire shop! Having road side service is a good ideal, but having along your own spare tire may make your emergency a better experience.
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:47 AM   #88
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Alaska and Tires

We traveled Alaska a year ago and part of the tire decision for you depends on your planned routes. Dawson City, Prudhoe Bay, Tuktoyaktuk, Chicken, McCarthy and Manly Hot Springs are just a few of the beautiful spots with great sights but all somewhat off the beaten path. With our pickup/camper we choose to travel every numbered road in Alaska and several in the Yukon, and of course Alberta and BC just to get there. 18,000 total miles and two major flats which legally ruined the tires due to the size of the penetration. I also thank the TP warning which allowed a safe stop before full deflation. Many of the stones used on the highway are fairly sharp and the tire mechanic called them "stone drills" since they get caught in the tread and work themselves in a little more each revolution. Although our F350 was equipped with 10 Ply Michelin tires we replaced two even though we plugged one and patched the second they technically were not legal for the road. We carried two mounted spares and since this journey have added a reliable (not Hazard Fraught) hydraulic jack and a battery operated impact wrench. Pneumatic wrenches (even though we have an onboard compressor and tank) require too large a hose to render adequate torque backed up be a 48 inch breaker bar. We also upgraded our tires to Cooper AT3 tires and successfully navigated Nova Scotia and Labrador (600 miles of gravel highway known for flats) without a problem this summer.



There are tire suppliers in AK around the state but keep in mind they might be hundreds of miles from your location. The flat we had on the Dalton Hwy at Dead Horse was on heavy gravel with no shoulder and heavy commercial traffic on the highway. Welcome assistance from a construction worker helped make the change rapidly in 25 degree weather with 35 mph winds. The tire shop (actually a heavy equipment repair facility) indicated a replacement tire would take 2 weeks to have shipped up with a very hefty freight charge. Thankfully we still had one good spare and the repaired tire as a backup. And over 500 miles of gravel and marginal pavement to a major city where we replaced the badly damaged tire at a cost 50% higher than cost in the lower 48.


Long and short of the story is be prepared. Either have enough equipment and replacements or have enough mental fortitude for what could be a long down time. Make some calls ahead of time and locate correct tires and service before your adventure if you choose not to carry a spare. There is a lot of commercial trucking, chances are you can find them but it would be better to know and be prepared, the replacement might be 500 or a 1000 miles away, or it might be just a few mile down the road. Another tip for increased tire life, if you see a small orange flag or cone on the side of the road, slow down. It means a pothole or frostheave or broken pavement. Flags are easier than highway maintenance.


And most importantly, enjoy the trip. If you are prepared the worry about any of this is behind you. There are so many sights and adventures in which to partake the proper planning will eliminate the "what ifs" and increase the overall enjoyment and splendor you are about to behold. Truly one of the best adventures we ever had, in fact we are already planning another trip north with more emphasis on the roads less traveled! And don't forget your Milepost.
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:13 AM   #89
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I built a spar tire carrier for my 22.5 tire on my hitch then added a extender so I can tow my Jeep. I also bought a torque multiplier to easily take the lug nuts off without any air tools. Yes I will still call for roadside assistance if I can but nice to know I can fix a flat if stranded.
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:27 AM   #90
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Alaska bound

I’ve made the drive several times from oregon to clam gulch area for fishing. All I can say is it’s an amazing trip to make. First trip was 14ish years ago and another 8 years back then again 2 years ago. The last we drove a 99 Monaco signature 40’ coach with a flat trailer and a toad, with an extra 250 gallons of fuel. I took 1trailer spare (as the roads tires would bolt on in a pinch and had new 10 plys on the trailer. As well the coach tires where only 2.5 years old with around 8k on them. We also had a full size mounted spare.


If you’re making the trip why not have piece of mind that you can change a tire if needed. I would definetily have a jack, and a good headlight. A lot of the folks on here are offering advice and never made the trip or could even imagine the amount of isolated/desolate/ uninhabited area in the Canadian north-which you will drive through to get to Alaska. There are some areas that you won’t see so much as a light for 6-8 hours let alone another person or a tire shop.

A lot of people commenting keep mentioning there AAA ECT. if you have to drive 200 miles to get cell service. Only for them to tell you it will be 2 days to get out there- ya I’ll pass. Being prepared is key.

Don’t remember when you said you where going but the biggest thing to remember is taking a heavy Deet laden mosquito repellant. Otherwise a 30 minute tire change in you’re driveway may turn into the most miserable 3 hours of you’re life. The wildlife in Canada/Alaska is just that wild and fighting to survive.
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:53 AM   #91
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From an experienced RV'r:

All of the above excellent advice should be considered. However, you should understand that changing a tire is not a big problem with the correct tools and jack. However, you should consider the age of the tires. A rule I use is not to travel with a tire over 5 years old from manufacture date regardless of miles driven on it.

FIRST: Look online (or see a dealer) to find the code pressed on the tire to determine the week and year of manufacture (different brands use discrete manufacturing codes that are required by law to be pressed on the tire). then, look up any recall history of the tire manufacturer for the brand you have. Now, you know your tires!

NEXT: Most tires EXPLODE after hitting debris on the road at highway speeds. And, there will likely be collateral damage to the rig! Plan on that. Have with you what you think you might need to make a quick repair job to the rig, i.e. valterra valve(s) behind rear wheels, adhesive rubber tape, etc. in the tool box.

LASTLY: Plan your trip with particular repair stations in mind for the unforeseeable to happen.

So, like having an umbrella with you... then, it probably won't rain on your trip! Enjoy it.

Post pictures of your trip so we can all enjoy it too!

tom
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Old 01-11-2019, 10:58 AM   #92
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Tools needed

Here are some of the tools you may consider:

Torque Wrench $289
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Torque Multiplier $130
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Tire Irons $56/each 37” long buy 2 or 3
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Black Jack Murphys Concentrated Paste $26 pail 8lbs
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Impact Extentions 4”. 6”. 10” $25
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Kobalt 24 volt 1/2” impact wrench $200?
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-24-V...nly/1000061167

Ten Lug Nut Tightening Sequence
https://www.google.com/search?q=10+l...QxkDS1yrrkTyM:

It’s worth having a good torque multiplier rather then 6’ pipes, etc; your spouse could break loose any lug nut with a torque multiplier.

Have the right torque wrench. Under torqued or over torqued lug nuts can be a dangerous thing. Use the correct lug nut tightening sequence. I tighten about 4 times, first all snug, then to about 200 ft lbs, then 300 ft lbs, then the final 450 ft lbs. There are many techniques, just don’t tighten the first one to 450 ft lbs while the others are completely loose. I use a Kobalt 24 volt 1/2” impact wrench with impact rated adapters, extentions and sockets (33 MM on mine). Use the torque wrench for the final torque of 450 ft lbs.

If you will be putting tires on rims you will need Murphy’s Concentrated Paste. It is a very thick soap (thick like yogurt). Add some hot water to a few tablespoons for mounting and dismounting lubrication, and use full paste on bead to seal the rim so air will not escape when first filling tire. Clean off paste and return to bucket to use in the future.

It’s worth practicing dismounting and mounting a new tire with rim if you have a spare rim. I bought a 22.5” steel rim for $175 I think. I have hub centered rim, so be sure to buy the correct rim. There are not many lug centered rims around anymore.

I listed about $800 or so of tools.

Have a great time, and good luck.

Cheers
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Old 01-11-2019, 03:26 PM   #93
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Changing a Flat Tire on the Rig

I am sure you will love Alaska, we were there just last year and it is beautiful. Good for you for thinking ahead but just a couple considerations. We were at one campsite and another gentleman could not get his truck to start after camping overnight. There was no cell service so we offered to go to the next town and call for him. We waited on hold on our cell phone when we could get service for over 40 minutes for AMA. Finally we went to the trooper office and called and they dispatched a tow truck for him. Just something to bear in mind, there is not always cell service and help can be a long time coming. We were the only other campers in the campground with this gentleman and I am not sure what he would have done if he was alone. Point being you have to be a little more self sufficient up there!
Safe travels
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Old 01-11-2019, 04:47 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlo166 View Post
All of the above excellent advice should be considered. However, you should understand that changing a tire is not a big problem with the correct tools and jack. However, you should consider the age of the tires. A rule I use is not to travel with a tire over 5 years old from manufacture date regardless of miles driven on it.

FIRST: Look online (or see a dealer) to find the code pressed on the tire to determine the week and year of manufacture (different brands use discrete manufacturing codes that are required by law to be pressed on the tire). then, look up any recall history of the tire manufacturer for the brand you have. Now, you know your tires!

NEXT: Most tires EXPLODE after hitting debris on the road at highway speeds. And, there will likely be collateral damage to the rig! Plan on that. Have with you what you think you might need to make a quick repair job to the rig, i.e. valterra valve(s) behind rear wheels, adhesive rubber tape, etc. in the tool box.

LASTLY: Plan your trip with particular repair stations in mind for the unforeseeable to happen.

So, like having an umbrella with you... then, it probably won't rain on your trip! Enjoy it.

Post pictures of your trip so we can all enjoy it too!

tom
Most tires EXPLODE, BLOWOUT, due to running overloaded or under-inflated.

Actually, they suffer rapid loss of air pressure due to overheating. There isn't any explosives in a tire.

Some reading on the issue.

The term "blowout" is generally used by drivers to describe a bursting tire accompanied by a rapid loss of air pressure. While one might assume that all blowouts are caused by too much internal pressure bursting a weak spot in the tire, the main reason for them is just the opposite. Most blowouts are caused by too little air pressure allowing the tire to flex beyond its elastic limits until it overheats to the point where the rubber loses its bond to the internal fabric and steel cord reinforcement.

https://m.tirerack.com/tires/tiretec....jsp?techid=13
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:07 PM   #95
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Trip to Alaska

Wouldn’ Recommend trying to change a tire on your own. As for a spare I would not make this trip without one. You are going to be out in the wilderness for quite a bit of this trip. If you need to change a tire whoever does change it would charge you a fortune for a used tire if they have one. I have made the trip twice and never had to replace but know gas alone is expensive. First suggestion is to get a milepost that provides you a roadmap of all facilities along the way. Make sure you have a good spare for your toad as well. Gas stations and maintenance can be hundreds of miles away.
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Old 01-11-2019, 06:40 PM   #96
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It's not ideal but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Victory Blue View Post
Carrying a spare sounds like an idea until you realize many of us have 2 different size tires on our coaches. We have 315s on the front and 295s on the back.
It's not ideal, but you can carry a 295 as a SPARE and use it on either end if needed. Obviously it would need to be changed ASAP is put on the front. Yes it'll drive a bit weird and you'll want to keep your speed down, but it's a spare, meant to get you to a place for a permanent repair.
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Old 01-11-2019, 07:19 PM   #97
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Torque Multiplier

Being new to RVing myself. First thing bring the classA rig home , I had a brake issue. After reading up on this problem, taking the wheel off at 450 ft pounds torque was not going to happen. A friend told me about a Torque Multipler. The best 50$ I think I’ve ever spent! You can take the lugs off with no problem at all. This tool is a must have for classA !
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:55 PM   #98
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Whaaaaa? My 2008 Allegro Bus, which I just bought, Has a spare tire mounted on the correct wheel in a Bay. It is not a slide bay. I tried to move this thing thinking it uses too much room. Could not even budge it, like it is superglued to the floor? I suppose a tire man is capable? A friend of mine told me this story, calling himself a dummy, he had old tires, blew one on the rear, called service, they convinced him that the other tire was overstressed and he bought two new tires from a service truck. Very expensive, whatcha gonna do?
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