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Old 02-02-2011, 01:28 AM   #1
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Which truck

Researching how much truck to buy for slide-in camper. I am looking at an F350 or possibly F450 crewcab dually w/ 8' bed. Want to get 11' slide-in w/or w/out slides. Will use in future to tow 21' fiberglass boat, which is pretty heavy already. Read lots about "getting enough" truck, "calculate weights", "1T dually overweight by xx pounds". If price is similar does it make sense to upgrade to F450? Any help appreciated.
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Old 02-02-2011, 01:42 AM   #2
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Me, I would go for the 450. I am running over the scales at over 18K when loaded for the road including the toad, which puts my 350 dually overloaded, but it handles good and have had no problems in over 7 years and many thousands of miles coast to coast, but if I live long enough to go for new truck it will be a 550 or maybe even a 750. Just my take on the situation.
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Old 02-02-2011, 01:49 PM   #3
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I don't hear anyone complaining about too much truck but I suppose a F750 towing a 20' TT would be a bit of overkill. It sure wouldn't know it was there and you wouldn't need sway bars and/or WD hitch.
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Old 02-02-2011, 01:55 PM   #4
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Better overkill, than overloaded.
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Old 02-03-2011, 10:11 AM   #5
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F450
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Old 02-03-2011, 10:29 AM   #6
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I'm a owner of a F350, crew cab, full size bed, dually with tow package. Does everthing we have needed or asked it to do, from camper to 4 horse show trailer, to NH 185.b skid steer on dump trailer. We looked into the F450 and decided on the F350. The only addition was an AUX transmission cooler. Still in service for the past ten years. Including countless moves with trailer of friends and family. One day I'll get that bumper sticker "Yes it's my truck, NO I'm not helping you move".

One recall for crankshaft poistion sensor, no out of pocket cost just an hour of hanging out at the dealership.

Safe Travels.
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Old 02-03-2011, 09:08 PM   #7
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Ford dropped their RAWR (9000 RAWR) on the F450 and actually has less payload because its a heavier truck according to Fords buildrs web site.
The F350 DRW 6.7 diesel supercab 2wd has a 22500 lb tow rating and can carry about the same axle loads as the GM

The new '11 3500 DRW GM Dmax/A 2wd long bed extended cab will carrry 6,838.2 lbs of payload and has a tow rating of 21500 lbs according to GM webs site.

The 3500 Dodge/Cummins has one of the larger RAWR at 9350and can carry over 6000 lbs according to truck selection. Tow rating is around 17000 lbs. Use Dodge body builders guide for a particular trucks RAWR and its tow rating.

Good hunting.
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Old 02-03-2011, 09:24 PM   #8
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The 350 will "do it" no doubt but there is a definite difference from being able to "do it" and "doing it within the trucks specs". My 3/4 ton is 400hp and 1018 ft/lb torque, it will tow whatever you could put behind it, but it is only rated for 12,000lb towing and that's the maximum "legally" I can tow. I stick to the manufacturers specs because DW is in the insurance biz and if you should be unfortunate enough to have an accident and you are not within the limits of the truck, your insurance will most likely be void. The insurance companies are just looking for anything they can to deny a claim, don't let this happen to you. Check the specs and the total combined weights you will have on the truck if a 450 will do it go for that, if you need more then go for more truck or scale things back to fit your limits. That's my 2 bits worth anyway.
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Old 02-03-2011, 10:16 PM   #9
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[QUOTE=JIMNLIN;783733]Ford dropped their RAWR (9000 RAWR) on the F450 and actually has less payload because its a heavier truck according to Fords buildrs web site.
The F350 DRW 6.7 diesel supercab 2wd has a 22500 lb tow rating and can carry about the same axle loads as the GM

The new '11 3500 DRW GM Dmax/A 2wd long bed extended cab will carrry 6,838.2 lbs of payload and has a tow rating of 21500 lbs according to GM webs site.

The 3500 Dodge/Cummins has one of the larger RAWR at 9350and can carry over 6000 lbs according to truck selection. Tow rating is around 17000 lbs. Use Dodge body builders guide for a particular trucks RAWR and its tow rating.
QUOTE]
I'm not going to question your numbers but the GM would have to have a GCWR of around 30K to have that kind of tow rating. I have trouble believing that.
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Old 02-04-2011, 10:10 AM   #10
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GM says it has a 27500 GCWR for the Dmax and 24500 GCWR for the 6.0 gasser.

For some reason this web is the only one I'm a member of that my internet supplier won't let me use the webs insert link program. Check out GM online ordering guide web for the new numbers. Lots of RVers struggle with the new payload/axle load capacities/tow ratings and GCWR numbers from Ford and GM. These new gen trucks aren't our grandfathers old spec trucks. Yes with GMs new 9375 RAWR and the trucks 13000 lb GVWR many folks out here in the rest of the world have their 3500 DRW with a 21100 lb tow ratings plus the trucks 13000 GVWR = 34100 "combined ". With those big 9375 RAWR from GM there hauling over 6000 lb over the axle.

I would suggest to anyone, look at the new specs from GM and especially Ford on the gutted carrying capacity F450. With 19.5 wheels and tires and bigger brakes it won't haul anymore weight than the F350 DRW if Fords web is correct. Check it out.
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Old 02-04-2011, 10:27 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by JIMNLIN View Post
GM says it has a 27500 GCWR for the Dmax and 24500 GCWR for the 6.0 gasser.

For some reason this web is the only one I'm a member of that my internet supplier won't let me use the webs insert link program. Check out GM online ordering guide web for the new numbers. Lots of RVers struggle with the new payload/axle load capacities/tow ratings and GCWR numbers from Ford and GM. These new gen trucks aren't our grandfathers old spec trucks. Yes with GMs new 9375 RAWR and the trucks 13000 lb GVWR many folks out here in the rest of the world have their 3500 DRW with a 21100 lb tow ratings plus the trucks 13000 GVWR = 34100 "combined ". With those big 9375 RAWR from GM there hauling over 6000 lb over the axle. With Gvwr above 26K many states require a different drivers licence

I would suggest to anyone, look at the new specs from GM and especially Ford on the gutted carrying capacity F450. With 19.5 wheels and tires and bigger brakes it won't haul anymore weight than the F350 DRW if Fords web is correct. Check it out.
Sounds like a big case of pulling the wool over our eyes. They aren't selling 1T trucks but are selling bigger, heaver trucks, calling them 3500 and saying our truck can haul more than your truck. Then people that don't want a big heavy truck can say, I just have a 1T. With a GVWR over 26K, many states require a different license.
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Old 02-04-2011, 10:52 AM   #12
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I believe it is a federal mandate that any vehicle over a class 6, (26,000lb), requires a commercial drivers licence.
A friend of mine went through the expense of getting one and now regrets it. the commercial rules apply to him even when he is driving a small car, (no traffic school if ticketed, lower alcohol limits, etc.).
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Old 02-04-2011, 11:02 AM   #13
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I believe it is a federal mandate that any vehicle over a class 6, (26,000lb), requires a commercial drivers licence.
Nope, not necessarily. The federal government doesn't issue my driver's license - the state of Texas does. Texas requires a Class A non-commercial license for GCWRs of 26,001 lbs and over (towed load over 10,000 lbs) or a Class B non-commercial license for GCWRs of 26,001 lbs and over with towed loads of 10,000 lbs or less. Check with your home state and comply with their requirements - the driver license reciprocity agreement between states will cover you wherever you travel as if you're legally licensed in your home state, you'll be OK in other states.

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Old 02-05-2011, 01:16 AM   #14
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Commercial Driver's License Program (CDL/CDLIS) - Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 was signed into law on October 27, 1986. The goal of the Act is to improve highway safety by ensuring that drivers of large trucks and buses are qualified to operate those vehicles and to remove unsafe and unqualified drivers from the highways. The Act retained the State's right to issue a driver's license, but established minimum national standards which States must meet when issuing CDLs.

It is important to note that the Act does not require drivers to obtain a separate Federal license; it merely requires States to upgrade their existing testing and licensing programs, if necessary, to conform to the Federal minimum standards.

Drivers are required to obtain and hold a CDL if they operate in interstate, intrastate, or foreign commerce if they drive a vehicle that meets any of the classifications of a CMV described below.

Classes of License:

The Federal standard requires States to issue a CDL to drivers according to the following license classifications:

Class A -- Any combination of vehicles with a GCWR of 26,001 or more pounds provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.

Class B -- Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVWR.

Click the link at the top if you wish to read the whole thing.
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