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Old 01-03-2013, 05:21 PM   #1
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Everglades National Park vulture problem

Wow, I wouldn't want these guys to get near my rig!

HOMESTEAD, Fla. - Visitors to parts of Everglades National Park are getting tarps and bungee cords to make their vehicles less delectable to vultures.

Migrating vultures have developed a habit of ripping off windshield wipers, sunroof seals, and other rubber and vinyl vehicle parts. Visitors to the park's Homestead and Flamingo entrances are loaned "anti-vulture kits" to protect their vehicles.

Park wildlife biologist Skip Snow tells The Miami Herald that the vultures are migrating as normal. It's just not clear why the birds are picking at parked cars and trucks. Park employees have tried to scare away the vultures, but nothing has worked.

Park Superintendent Dan Kimball says complaints about the vultures have declined since employees began distributing the tarps and bungee cords last year.
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:49 PM   #2
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We have a vulture roost about 1/4 mile from our house during the summer. We haven't had any issues with them.

Of course (see my screen name) my callsign was Vulture 47 in 'Nam so I have a soft spot in my heart for the ugly beasts.
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Old 01-03-2013, 06:21 PM   #3
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They are a problem in some Florida state parks also, with the same damage.
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Old 01-04-2013, 03:49 PM   #4
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Vultures behaving badly. Makes one wonder what those rubberized droppings can do from high altitude?
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:19 PM   #5
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There is a reason for the Vultures going after the Rubber seals, wipers, and other gaskets. They think the rubber parts are food.The rubber parts (even plastics) are molded or extruded thru a dies to form its finished part. Once the rubber has cured it has to be removed from the mold without damaging the part. Usually the MFG will use a release agent. A release agent has to allow the part to be extruded or removed from the die. So, the release agent has two functions. 1. release or allow the part to be extruded 2. be inexpensive, cheap is even better. that is why most mfg who mold parts use good old Mineral Oil. now the car or MH mfg put it on the vehicle. The vehicle sets in the sun or open air, even in a garage and the trace amount of oils from extrusion starts to stink (if you had a jar of it you would say it turns rancid). You, me and most people won't smell it but birds, rats and other critters will smell it. Oh FOOD! and the go after it, just setting there waiting for them to eat it. One of Americas major inboard/outboard mfg had the problem on the hyd hoses on the rear of boats. Beavers, muskrats would smell it, bite the hyd line and cause a hyd failure. Merc cured the problem by changing to SS braided hoses. Good hunting!
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDALLSAILS View Post
There is a reason for the Vultures going after the Rubber seals, wipers, and other gaskets. They think the rubber parts are food.The rubber parts (even plastics) are molded or extruded thru a dies to form its finished part. Once the rubber has cured it has to be removed from the mold without damaging the part. Usually the MFG will use a release agent. A release agent has to allow the part to be extruded or removed from the die. So, the release agent has two functions. 1. release or allow the part to be extruded 2. be inexpensive, cheap is even better. that is why most mfg who mold parts use good old Mineral Oil. now the car or MH mfg put it on the vehicle. The vehicle sets in the sun or open air, even in a garage and the trace amount of oils from extrusion starts to stink (if you had a jar of it you would say it turns rancid). You, me and most people won't smell it but birds, rats and other critters will smell it. Oh FOOD! and the go after it, just setting there waiting for them to eat it. One of Americas major inboard/outboard mfg had the problem on the hyd hoses on the rear of boats. Beavers, muskrats would smell it, bite the hyd line and cause a hyd failure. Merc cured the problem by changing to SS braided hoses. Good hunting!
Many ornithologists believe that, in general, birds have little or no sense of smell. That is why the only predators that skunks need to worry about are Great Horned Owls and automobiles. Neither one has a sense of smell. See Do Birds Have a Sense of Smell? | Audubon Magazine Blog

Some researchers have conducted experiments that demonstrated that Turkey Vultures are an exception, and do have some sense of smell. Other researchers have repeated the same experiments and concluded that TVs have no more sense of smell than any other bird.
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Old 01-05-2013, 09:53 AM   #7
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Nope, I beg to differ with you. ENP has a people problem, not a vulture problem.
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Old 01-05-2013, 11:16 AM   #8
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Nope, I beg to differ with you. ENP has a people problem, not a vulture problem.
X2 First the released pythons, now vultures!!
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Old 01-05-2013, 11:34 AM   #9
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Everglades Park offers ‘anti-vulture kits’ to protect visitor cars - Environment - MiamiHerald.com

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Old 01-05-2013, 12:44 PM   #10
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X2 First the released pythons, now vultures!!
I don't understand why you lump pythons and vultures together. Turkey Vultures are native to most of the U.S., and Black Vultures are native to the south eastern part of the country.

Joel
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Old 01-05-2013, 03:39 PM   #11
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I don't understand why you lump pythons and vultures together. Turkey Vultures are native to most of the U.S., and Black Vultures are native to the south eastern part of the country.

Joel
Not knocking the vultures. I personally think they are "beautiful" and carry out an important function in nature. But for some reason, thier numbers seem to be exploding.

Just saying that the Everglades are undergoing some real problems.

I am no expert, but I can say that major changes are underway there. It is NOT the same Everglades it was 30 years ago, when I lived close to the area from 1973 to 2006.

Also, another stressor are the underground fires burning in the peat there. There is no pratical way to put them out.

It is heartbreaking to watch such a beautiful area degrade.
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