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Old 06-30-2014, 10:25 AM   #1
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Bad weather driving

Been RVing for 4 years now and wonder what other RVers do when they are faced with a bad forecast.
For example, we are stopped over in North Platte NE, 400 miles west of our planned destination of Des Moines. Severe thunder storms are predicted for the Des Moines area with a 40% possibility for tornados.
I'm staying in North Platte and not moving an inch. Even Lincoln NE is in the storm zone.

What do you more experienced travelers do? Where do you draw the line?
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Old 06-30-2014, 10:50 AM   #2
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In the mid-west if you don't travel during a thurnderstorm or tornado watch/warning you won't get very far very fast. This time of year fast moving and developing storms are very common. I've been in heavy rain that slowed driving to 40 MPH four times in the past 30 days, but no problems.

Tornadoes are very isolated and your chance of being involved with one is very small. My suggestion is to use common sense, slow down when necessary and watch your weather radar.
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Old 06-30-2014, 10:52 AM   #3
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Safety First, keep an eye on the weather and if it's nasty , stop where you are , postpone trip , do what-ever it takes to avoid a situation that may put yourself, your family, or your vehicle at risk.

Wet roads are one thing , flooded is quite another. I travel mountain roads in the fall and spring, look at the 5 day forecasts and proceed with caution , and have still had to lay up for day due to storms . MH with toads don't do well on ice.
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Old 06-30-2014, 11:26 AM   #4
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In the mid-west if you don't travel during a thurnderstorm or tornado watch/warning you won't get very far very fast. This time of year fast moving and developing storms are very common. I've been in heavy rain that slowed driving to 40 MPH four times in the past 30 days, but no problems.

Tornadoes are very isolated and your chance of being involved with one is very small. My suggestion is to use common sense, slow down when necessary and watch your weather radar.

Rich, so you would travel through a corridor for 400 miles where the experts tell you you definitely hit extremely windy, 50-60 mph plus winds, severe thunderstorms with damaging hail, and tornado conditions? You would roll right into it? I'm not talking moderate risk here if you saw the forecast.
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Old 06-30-2014, 11:40 AM   #5
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There exists an Official US government quiz "Are You Prepared" I took it, Well one of the questions was "Where is the safest place to take shelter during a Hurricane".. Fact this applies to ALL disasters, Tornado included.

The answer is "A shelter outside the storm area" (Or if you like Elsewhere) good for fire, explosion, flood, storm, earthquake and _____.

WIth winds like that I'd not be thinking of driving, i'd be thinking of PARKING, possibly slides in and defently jacks down. With my rig pointed downwind if possible (I would rather take a high wind in the rear then the front)
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Old 06-30-2014, 11:46 AM   #6
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With less than 2,000 miles under my belt, I still get stressed with the cross winds. Swerving at 60+ mph is no fun for someone with little experience. I see other MHs on the road so I know it isn't too bad to proceed...but I slow it down a bit to remain confident that I am in control. With more miles traveled comes experience.
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Old 06-30-2014, 11:59 AM   #7
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Better answered by the individual driving.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rkh View Post
Rich, so you would travel through a corridor for 400 miles where the experts tell you you definitely hit extremely windy, 50-60 mph plus winds, severe thunderstorms with damaging hail, and tornado conditions? You would roll right into it? I'm not talking moderate risk here if you saw the forecast.
I don't think Rich meant he would drive straight into bad weather, he stated he watches is weather radar. I do just what Rich does.

We race in professional motorsports so sitting in one spot due to weather is not an option, unless of course you know there is damaging hail or flooding on the route you are taking. Normally if it is an issue it is going to hit where you are sitting too. If it is much further out, it will have changed by the time you get there or you can take a different route. We are on our 9th hauler which has been over 25 years and only once were we ever in a bad situation (ice) which meant pulling over and waiting it out. I think the better answer is if you are not very confident or skilled with your driving staying put is a good idea. Another is, if you are not in any hurry and have all the time in the world, why not side back and enjoy things where you are at, provided the tornado is not going to develop and hit the RV park you are at. That last one has some truth. In Alberta Canada we left an RV park that ended up getting hit by a Tornado the same day we left. That day we left clouds and wind, an hour later we ended up in hot sun. Glad we didn't stay. Watch the weather and plan around it. We drive these things is snow, ice, sun, rain, whatever is before us. I have to agree with the one poster, towing and ice would be less fun.

You asked what others do, so that is what I am posting. Not advice for others. Drive with what you are comfortable is my advice.
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Old 06-30-2014, 12:31 PM   #8
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Thanks sizzler, I don't know what rich meant, so I clarified my post.
Weather forecast is good where I sit now. Horrific where I was going.
I just wanted some feedback from others to see what their fear threshold is...
Thanks for your post
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Old 06-30-2014, 12:54 PM   #9
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Thanks sizzler, I don't know what rich meant, so I clarified my post.
Weather forecast is good where I sit now. Horrific where I was going.
I just wanted some feedback from others to see what their fear threshold is...
Thanks for your post
I know lots of people use GPS and weather electronics, but we just use our iPhones and watch the weather. I would be more confident if I know the road I will be travelling on. What I do find is that depending on how far away you are, the weather will be different by the time you get there. At least with tornados and thunder storms. Hurricane weather systems seem to linger. Use long range forecast to predict your timing and if there is a good chance of bad weather and roads, you may want to find a different route or go later. The point I was making in my last post is, if there weather is going to stay great where you are, ver where you are going, then I may be inclined to leave later hoping the weather will clear up.

One big factor for me is if I have my family with me, which is normally not racing days, then I might want to sit in the nice weather a day longer.

I like driving at night or early morning when no one is on the road as well, but in weather, I will tackle it during the day, just to take the night driving element out.

The one poster that stated having more experience seems to be a good indicator of "the fear factor" where drawing the line would be different for each person. With my experience, I know these RVs can take more than one would think. Not that you should push that limit, but it is further out than you think. That just comes with experience. I am just rambling now because I don't have a great answer for you here. Just driving within your comfort zone. Maybe test yourself close to home in some bad weather to build some knowledge of how your rig reacts etc.

Hope my ramble offers something to you. Good luck and be safe.
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Old 06-30-2014, 01:42 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuclear View Post
With less than 2,000 miles under my belt, I still get stressed with the cross winds. Swerving at 60+ mph is no fun for someone with little experience. I see other MHs on the road so I know it isn't too bad to proceed...but I slow it down a bit to remain confident that I am in control. With more miles traveled comes experience.
IMO it will depend upon the weather you are encountering. If you are swerving more than you are comfortable with the best thing to do is slow down. It will give you more reaction time.

If traffic backs up behind you pull over or off to let traffic by once in a while. If you have an accident they will have to stop while the accident scene is cleaned up.

Part of this thread is tough because the definition of bad is different from one person to another. Bad could mean anything from storms are predicted to storms are happening. In the OP statement there is a 40% chance of tornados. That would be getting into the area of concern if the weather at your current location is predicted to be fine.

All in all it is a judgement call which depends upon the risk you are willing to take.
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Old 06-30-2014, 01:57 PM   #11
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Rkh,
I just came thru that particular area a couple of weeks ago, and I had the same thoughts about weather. I watched the local wx forecasts as well as online each night, and would have either sat where I was, or detoured significantly if my next day's routing was questionable. The effects of high winds (and of course tornadoes) and or hail associated with severe tstms are the things I worry the most about.
When I was younger and bulletproof, I might have dared a severe thunderstorm/tornado potential forecast, but I'm never in enough hurry now to chance it.
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Old 06-30-2014, 02:59 PM   #12
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Two months ago we were holed up in Cheyenne for 3 days because of high winds ... I-80 was closed to high profile vehicles ...

When we did leave we saw an 18 wheeler being lifted out of the ditch ... it had been blown off the road and laying on its side ... obliviously an empty 18 wheeler is no match for wind gusts exceeding 60 mph ... and I am not going to find out what kind of wind gusts will overturn a loaded class A motorhome.
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