Go Back   iRV2 Forums > CAMPING, TRAVEL and TRIP PLANNING > Navigation, Routes & Roads
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-10-2015, 09:07 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
ABrask's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Loudon, TN
Posts: 165
Driving on snow-covered roads?

I've never driven my class A on snow covered roads, and there's a good chance my wife and I will encounter some on our trip from Chicago to Los Angeles next week. Obviously I'd wait out any ice conditions, but I'm curious what more experienced folks have to say about driving on plowed roads? Will the RV's weight make for decent traction? Assuming we take it slow, what should we expect? Thanks in advance.....
__________________

__________________
ABrask is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-10-2015, 09:16 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,165
It does not matter what you are driving. Ice and snow conditions result in reduced traction for all vehicles.

IMO if you slow down, drive as smoothly as possible (avoid quick moves, hard acceleration or braking) you will be OK. I note you suggest you will stop if the conditions are too severe. This IMO that is the best policy.
__________________

__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 09:38 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
ABrask's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Loudon, TN
Posts: 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
It does not matter what you are driving. Ice and snow conditions result in reduced traction for all vehicles.

IMO if you slow down, drive as smoothly as possible (avoid quick moves, hard acceleration or braking) you will be OK. I note you suggest you will stop if the conditions are too severe. This IMO that is the best policy.
Thanks! We live in Chicago, so we're not entirely clueless about winter driving, but it's nice to hear that it's not totally insane to consider doing it in an RV.

Your Tour looks fantastic, by the way! My wife's sister and brother-in-law have one similar to it, and we're going to spend time with them in the same RV park in Arizona on our way out to California. Our poor little Palazzo will have an inferiority complex by the time we're done, I'm sure!
__________________
Alan, Margaret, and Lucy (the Maltipoo who runs the show)
2014 Thor Palazzo 33.2
2015 Mini Cooper 4-Door Hardtop Toad
ABrask is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 09:38 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 5,981
In snow areas once the roads are plowed and traffic has been through the roads pretty much clear off. The nice thing about the MH is that the house is there. That leaves me thinking the best way is to park until the plows and traffic did their part. Wait until rush hour is over then tuck in for the night around mid to late afternoon. You might be another day getting out of the snow belt but you will get there. In the mean time watch the national weather forecasts so you can avoid heading out into a multi day weather event!
__________________
nothermark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 09:51 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
homeless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: http://binged.it/1KdDqKO
Posts: 2,316
Blog Entries: 1
Snow covered roads would be about as good of an excuse as I can think of to boon dock any place you want!
homeless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 09:52 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Rockwood27's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Nor'easters Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Freedom, NH
Posts: 949
Most MH use highway traction type tires. They have little to no cross tread blocking like an all season or snow tire. They have limited traction in slippery conditions. Have you ever tried moving from a stop on wet grass? I live in NH and wouldn't want to drive with snow on the ground. Sudden stopping could also prove interesting!
__________________
Fran, Mary & Zoey (silver Cocker)
2006 Itasca Sunrise 35A, 2005 W-22, Allison 1000 5 speed
'13 Ford Focus ST or '10 Prius on Master Tow Dolly 80THD-SB or '00 Jeep Cherokee 4-down
Rockwood27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 10:08 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABrask View Post
Thanks! We live in Chicago, so we're not entirely clueless about winter driving, but it's nice to hear that it's not totally insane to consider doing it in an RV.

LOL!!! I live 50 miles west of Chicago and if you watch the news, just because you live in Chicago doesn't mean all people are not entirely clueless about winter driving! LOL!
__________________
Maverick50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 10:10 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
ABrask's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Loudon, TN
Posts: 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockwood27 View Post
Most MH use highway traction type tires. They have little to no cross tread blocking like an all season or snow tire. They have limited traction in slippery conditions. Have you ever tried moving from a stop on wet grass? I live in NH and wouldn't want to drive with snow on the ground. Sudden stopping could also prove interesting!
Is this any different than truck tires? We don't plan on doing any significant driving on roads that have not been plowed and are pretty much dry (and hopefully salted?), but even if one has pulled off to sit out a storm, there's always the possibility that they'll have to limp their way back onto the main highway.

Anyone reading this thread have experience dealing with these issues in a commercial truck?
__________________
Alan, Margaret, and Lucy (the Maltipoo who runs the show)
2014 Thor Palazzo 33.2
2015 Mini Cooper 4-Door Hardtop Toad
ABrask is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 10:14 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
450Donn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Dallas,OR
Posts: 2,555
Do you have chains? It is quite possible you could encounter a chains required situation in the rockies. Unless your clear down on I10
__________________
Don and Lorri
2007 Dodge 3500 dually
Resident Dummy.
450Donn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 10:19 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
87Rockwood's Avatar
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Looking here and there.
Posts: 732
We also live in NH (full time last 4 years) And I will add one thing-if it is a bad storm keep a show shovel inside to dig yourself out with in the morning. We have had the snow plow people pile snow up outside to were it was hard to open the door.
__________________
87Rockwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 10:23 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Rockwood27's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Nor'easters Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Freedom, NH
Posts: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABrask View Post
Is this any different than truck tires?
The smart truck drivers in my area will change out to a more aggressive tire tread on the drive axles. The not so smart ones often end up in the ditch! Some also carry chains.

BTW, after driving in all that salty, slushy snow, it's wise to carry extra windshield washer fluid. Spend time to thoroughly rinse the undercarriage.
__________________
Fran, Mary & Zoey (silver Cocker)
2006 Itasca Sunrise 35A, 2005 W-22, Allison 1000 5 speed
'13 Ford Focus ST or '10 Prius on Master Tow Dolly 80THD-SB or '00 Jeep Cherokee 4-down
Rockwood27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 10:30 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
ABrask's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Loudon, TN
Posts: 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockwood27 View Post
The smart truck drivers in my area will change out to a more aggressive tire tread on the drive axles. The not so smart ones often end up in the ditch! Some also carry chains.

BTW, after driving in all that salty, slushy snow, it's wise to carry extra windshield washer fluid. Spend time to thoroughly rinse the undercarriage.
Really good call about the extra wiper fluid and snow shovel. I've added both to our list. We're going south to I10 to stay well clear of the Rockies. I know that route from years past (taken in cars and SUVs), and I personally wouldn't even consider planning to do that in an RV this time of year.
__________________
Alan, Margaret, and Lucy (the Maltipoo who runs the show)
2014 Thor Palazzo 33.2
2015 Mini Cooper 4-Door Hardtop Toad
ABrask is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 10:47 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
halfwright's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 589
I have heard that as soon as you start to think, "Hey, This is not bad. I can drive on snow easily." it is time to park. And, there is always the other guy that is sure he knows how to drive on snow.

Me, I have a stomach problem that makes me pull over, park and make a pot of coffee instead of driving on snow. It is called "no guts."
__________________
Jim and Darlene Wright
plus Ryder, the Ethiopian
monkeybeaver dog
halfwright is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2015, 11:22 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Nowhere, now here. Freedom!
Posts: 3,003
If you have your mind set on driving in reduced traction conditions, you are gonna have to learn sometime. Unfortunately, there is almost only one way to learn, and that is to simply do it.

My suggestions:
  1. Reduce speed. Once you get some skill driving in reduced traction conditions, remember that on the wide open road, 40 is too fast! You should probably go much slower than that, but never more than 40MPH if you have doubts about traction.
  2. Leave more following distance. This gives you more time to react, think, plan, and execute your plan, then to react, think, plan and execute your next plan. Distance can save you if everything else goes wrong.
  3. Trust no one. That vehicle will do something stupid right in front of you, and you will have to be ready to deal with it.
  4. Relax your shoulders and do other things to reduce driver fatigue. I have to literally force my shoulders down before I shove my shoulders in my ears. I must look pretty funny sometimes, like I was born with no neck.
  5. Plan on driving days that are 10-25% of a normal length and/or distance day. Face it, if the traction is poor, you can't drive fast unless you are a psychopath. You won't be able to cover the big miles like you wanted to. Fatigue will set in much more quickly than on a bluebird day. You have to be ready to throw in the towel early, relax, wind down, so you can rest and throw yourself into the fray again tomorrow.
  6. Plan well ahead of time all of your stops: food, fuel, overnight. Parking lots can be impossible to get into with enough snow. They will also be full of travellers and truckers. You might have to consider starting your driving day earlier than normal, and stopping earlier than normal so you can be sure to have a decent place to stop for the night.
  7. Hold the steering wheel with your fingertips, and make gentle corrections and turns. Twitchy, sudden, or large changes in direction can easily send you off into the ditch, or worse. If a vehicle or other obstacle is coming right at you and you must change direction, the ditch might be a better choice than a big rig grill to your face, but in almost every case for most folks, small, gentle direction changes and lower speed tight maneuvering will work out well for everyone.
  8. Pack all the patience you can with you each day, and hope everyone did, too. 'Nuff said, I hope. Folks will screw up. You'll screw up. Folks might need a little help to get going, you might need a little help to get going. If you can't help, at least be patient. Hope others are patient with you, as well.
  9. Your brakes are gonna suck, so leave plenty of distance to use them safely. This might be where folks screw up the most that is very preventable. Leave lots of following distance for braking. Use the brakes as gently as possible. Know what it feels and/or sounds like when your ABS is operating due to loss of braking traction, and if it activates, don't let up on the pedal, let it do it's job, because if you let up on the pedal, you aren't slowing anymore, and you stepped on your brakes for a reason, right?
  10. Don't forget to check your mirrors. They can tell you things you can't find out otherwise. It also helps you relax your neck a little.
  11. Have some decent sunglasses always available. Snow can cause a great deal of eye fatigue.

So, basically, slow, smooth, distance, try to relax a little, shorter days, plan, plan, plan. And relax a little. Some of the problems you might encounter are out of your hands, so try to relax a bit, increase your following distance (how many time have I said this? ) and try to enjoy your trip.

Good luck.
__________________

__________________
ORV 19B Full Timer, '14 Ram 2500 Diesel and a GSD. This signature updated, May 1, '17.
Currently funemployed in Vancouver WA de K7NOL 146.52Mhz Safety? (CLICK ME!)
1bigmess is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Snow Chains or not G&J Entegra Owner's Forum 22 12-14-2015 03:58 AM
January roads - southern Oregon & northern Calif. Ron_H Navigation, Routes & Roads 8 11-11-2015 09:03 PM
Heat in wet bay while driving derba Entegra Owner's Forum 5 01-24-2015 06:14 PM
4K mile trip complete, man there's some bad roads out there! FIRE UP Freightliner Motorhome Chassis Forum 16 08-26-2014 05:24 PM
Parks with snow and keeping snow cleared off roads Mean1255 Camping Locations, Plans & Trip Reports 0 02-05-2014 08:01 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.