Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > 5th Wheel Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-25-2014, 03:54 PM   #1
Member
 
TXDIANIMAL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 57
Pin Weight - Pay Load - Hitch weight

Pin Weight - Pay Load - Hitch weight

Can someone explain the above 3 definitions and the difference in them.
__________________

__________________
TXDIANIMAL is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-25-2014, 05:52 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 314
Layman's reply:

Pin weight and hitch weight amount to the same thing. Pin weight normally refers to a 5th wheel trailer, hitch weight would normally be a travel trailer. In both cases, it is the amount of trailer weight carried by your tow vehicle. 5th wheel pin weight would normally be 15% to 25% of total trailer weight. Travel trailer hitch weight would normally be 10%-15% of total trailer weight.

Payload is the difference between the trailer dry weight and the max loaded weight (GVWR). For instance, my trailer has a advertised dry weight of 10,450. The GVWR is 13,850, giving me a payload of 3400 pounds.

It is a great idea to actually weigh your trailer and truck when it is loaded for travel. Most Rvers use the CAT scales found at the truck stop. I pulled my rig on the scale so that the front wheels are on one weight pad, the back wheels on a 2nd pad, and the trailer is on the third pad. After going in and getting this weight (they charged me $10), I unhook my trailer, go back with my truck, and ask for a re-weigh ($2). Here are the numbers from a trip through the scales earlier this week.

steer axle - 4480
drive axle - 5960
trailer axle - 10820
gross weight - 21260

re-weigh
steer axle - 4500
drive axle - 3660
gross weight - 8160

From this my hitch weight is 5960 - 3660 = 2300
My trailer weight is 2300 + 10820 = 13120

Given that my trailer is rated for 13850, I have room for another 730 pounds of payload.

My pin weight of 2300 pounds is 17.5% of my total trailer weight.
__________________

__________________
andy29847 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 09:48 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 63
A rookie question
should the 5th whl load the steering axle instead of unloading as yours does?
__________________
06 Dodge QCLB Dually Cummins G56 B&W Companion 03 Sierra 27 RLSS
going_postal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 10:00 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 314
Quote:
A rookie question
should the 5th whl load the steering axle instead of unloading as yours does?
I don't know. It could be that the center of gravity moved 20 pounds worth, or that the truck was positioned differently on the scale, or that the tolerance for the scale is ~20 pounds.
__________________
andy29847 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 10:16 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 314
Youse made me curious enough to check. CAT scale accuracy in the weight range of my truck is 20 pounds.

CAT Scale
(Digital)
Fairbanks Scales
Capacity: 200,000 pounds,
Division: 20 pounds Accuracy: HB 44, Class III L
20 lb (2,500 lb)
20 lb (10,000 lb)
40 lb (20,000 lb)
__________________
andy29847 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2014, 06:56 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,232
Quote:
Originally Posted by going_postal View Post
A rookie question
should the 5th whl load the steering axle instead of unloading as yours does?
I don't have numbers, but it definitely shouldn't unload it much. Because most hitches are over the rear axle + or - 2", it will slightly load or unload the steer.
__________________

__________________
jesilvas is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
weight



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Weight Distribution Spreadsheet Calculator davidgeminde Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 1 05-31-2014 09:37 AM
Tongue Weight Redistribution iMaki Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 18 04-26-2014 09:38 PM
1996 Travel Supreme 40RLTSO pin weight snoking 5th Wheel Discussion 9 03-22-2014 12:36 AM
Load range G vs. H? DDMA Class A Motorhome Discussions 5 02-14-2014 09:47 AM
Install reese dual cam today srg12 Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 7 06-08-2013 07:28 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.