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Old 09-17-2015, 09:01 PM   #1
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Rims Tire Pressure

I took my 16" Rim into Discount tire to check to see what pressure I could go up to no markings for pressure checkDOT site it has load and all other markings. Discount Tire says I can go to 110 PSI G tire. Sound Right? My last blowout was 2900 damage.
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Old 09-17-2015, 09:13 PM   #2
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I'd ask the wheel manufacturer.
110 lbs, you'll need the right valve stems too.
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Old 09-18-2015, 11:58 AM   #3
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Rims are not required to be marked with a load capacity or tire inflation capacity. Some OEM providers will demand that one or the other or both be displayed on the rims they want to provide. Other vendors may not provide any capacities. The ultimate responsibility rests in the hands of the trailer manufacturer. Their requirement is to provide a tire/rim paring that is compatible with each other. The tire manufacturer provides a list of rims compatible with each tire they make.

The rim manufacturer must provide part number and serial number (if applicable) for each rim and insure each rim displays such information. Load capacity is the primary factor.

So, bottom line. When in doubt, get the numbers off the rim in question and call itís manufacturer for load capacity Confirmation.

Rims are certified by SAE.
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Old 09-18-2015, 12:08 PM   #4
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My Rims are marked with Load info MFG Info (China) DOT Stamp and thats about it. Can't call China.
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Old 09-18-2015, 12:29 PM   #5
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My Rims are marked with Load info MFG Info (China) DOT Stamp and thats about it. Can't call China.
What load rating?
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Old 09-18-2015, 12:42 PM   #6
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Your rim is rated for 110 psi - just like it is stamped.

If your trailer is like mine (XLT Thunderbolt), it came with ST 235/80-16 load range E tires with a max inflation of 80 pounds.

You original valve stems are most likely rated for 80 pounds.

If you want to install load range G tires (which can be inflated to 105 pounds), then you need to change valve stems. You should use a bolt on valve stem. Most of the bolt on valve stems are good to 150 pounds.

I put on Hankook F19 LT7.50R16 G tires. I have been very happy with the tires (12,000 miles).
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Old 09-18-2015, 12:45 PM   #7
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that's what they said steel valve stems bolt on. Wheel load rating is 3590 per wheel stamped on back Either Sailun or goodyears. I know some here say ST tires are ok I checked pressure and visually inspected less than an hour before blowout/separation
that did 2900.00 damage. Tires were less than 2 years old less than 3K on them.
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Old 09-18-2015, 02:19 PM   #8
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3,590# wheel rating would put you in the 100psi/3,550# rating for a "G" tire.

Fact is going from "E" to "G" you would want to go by actual tire load and add 5psi. This is per GY Tech going up in load rating. So running 100# on a "G" tire with your load most likely would be a good fit for your tires and wheel and give good tire wear and traction.
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Old 09-18-2015, 03:05 PM   #9
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I had a flat early in my RV life. The first sign that there was a problem was when I looked in the left rear view mirror and noticed drivers behind me slowing down. I looked in the right rear view mirror and saw pieces of tire flying off. I had a flat and also had $1000 worth of damage.



I switched to LT tires and added a tire pressure monitoring system. I traveled from April through the end of August without having to add any air. One other benefit is that I didn't have to get on my knees to check the damn tires every day I was on the road.

I started this spring with 100 pound cold inflation pressure. On the road, I could watch the tire pressure rise as the tires came up to operating temperature. Then I would see 115 - 120 pounds at interstate speeds.

FWIW, the TPMS alerted me to 2 problems this year. I was coming back from Flordia in late March and the TPMS went into alarm. My wife was driving and she immediately pulled into the interstate emergency lane. I could hear air escaping from one of the trailer tires as I got out of the cab of my truck. What I found was that one of my factory 80 pound valve stems had failed (that is how I found out about valve stems). No damage to the tire or the trailer. We put the spare on and went home. The second was a slow leak. We were on the way to Custer, SD. We spent the night in Ogallala, NE. I noticed the next morning that one tire was down about 10 pounds. I put some air in the tire and watched it with the TPMS as we drove. The tire reached and held normal pressure levels on the road. After our lunch stop, I noticed the tire was down about 10 pounds again. I inspected the tire, did not find anything, added air, and continued to Custer. The tire maintained pressure all the way to Custer. When I parked at the campground in Custer, the tire lost 10 pounds in 1 hour. Hmmm, I was only losing air when I was parked. I jacked up the wheel, did a close inspection, and found a small nail. I pulled the tire and wheel off and took it to town for repair.

IMHO, the TPMS paid for itself with these 2 incidents. Best of all is the TPMS gives me some significant peace of mind when I am on the road.
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Old 09-18-2015, 03:26 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by ddown View Post
that's what they said steel valve stems bolt on. Wheel load rating is 3590 per wheel stamped on back Either Sailun or goodyears. I know some here say ST tires are ok I checked pressure and visually inspected less than an hour before blowout/separation
that did 2900.00 damage. Tires were less than 2 years old less than 3K on them.
It probably says 3580?

Just because it does, does not mean it is rated for 110 psi. My stock rims also say 3580, but are only rated for 100 psi from the distributor. T03BM | Sendel Wheels

See the T03-66866BM** wheels listed at the bottom of the page.


And you will note the 6 bolt are only rated for 80 psi, even though rated for 3580.


See if you can track down more info on your wheels.
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Old 09-22-2015, 09:08 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by andy29847 View Post
I had a flat early in my RV life. The first sign that there was a problem was when I looked in the left rear view mirror and noticed drivers behind me slowing down. I looked in the right rear view mirror and saw pieces of tire flying off. I had a flat and also had $1000 worth of damage.



I switched to LT tires and added a tire pressure monitoring system. I traveled from April through the end of August without having to add any air. One other benefit is that I didn't have to get on my knees to check the damn tires every day I was on the road.

I started this spring with 100 pound cold inflation pressure. On the road, I could watch the tire pressure rise as the tires came up to operating temperature. Then I would see 115 - 120 pounds at interstate speeds.

FWIW, the TPMS alerted me to 2 problems this year. I was coming back from Flordia in late March and the TPMS went into alarm. My wife was driving and she immediately pulled into the interstate emergency lane. I could hear air escaping from one of the trailer tires as I got out of the cab of my truck. What I found was that one of my factory 80 pound valve stems had failed (that is how I found out about valve stems). No damage to the tire or the trailer. We put the spare on and went home. The second was a slow leak. We were on the way to Custer, SD. We spent the night in Ogallala, NE. I noticed the next morning that one tire was down about 10 pounds. I put some air in the tire and watched it with the TPMS as we drove. The tire reached and held normal pressure levels on the road. After our lunch stop, I noticed the tire was down about 10 pounds again. I inspected the tire, did not find anything, added air, and continued to Custer. The tire maintained pressure all the way to Custer. When I parked at the campground in Custer, the tire lost 10 pounds in 1 hour. Hmmm, I was only losing air when I was parked. I jacked up the wheel, did a close inspection, and found a small nail. I pulled the tire and wheel off and took it to town for repair.

IMHO, the TPMS paid for itself with these 2 incidents. Best of all is the TPMS gives me some significant peace of mind when I am on the road.
Interesting story. Have to wonder what you and others would have thought if you had the two tires loose air but didn't have the TPMS to warn you they were loosing air and you continued driving till someone caught your attention and you pulled over.
Probably they would have simply called the tires "defective Chinese junk" and insisted that since they had checked the air an hour previous and didn't remember ever driving over any nails were certain the failure was not a Run Low Flex Failure.
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Old 09-27-2015, 06:09 PM   #12
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Tireman9 - I took off all of the original tires off when I got home. One of the other tires, on the opposite side, on a different axle, and still holding 80 pounds, showed severe signs of impending failure. I was lucky to get home with it in one piece. It was going to be a "China bomb".





IMHO, too many people have had trouble with the tires that came on their 5th wheel. Also, virtually everyone who has switched to LT tires has stopped having "blowups". These 2 things together tell me that the "China bomb" story is a real one.
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Old 09-28-2015, 10:31 AM   #13
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Tireman9 - I took off all of the original tires off when I got home. One of the other tires, on the opposite side, on a different axle, and still holding 80 pounds, showed severe signs of impending failure. I was lucky to get home with it in one piece. It was going to be a "China bomb".





IMHO, too many people have had trouble with the tires that came on their 5th wheel. Also, virtually everyone who has switched to LT tires has stopped having "blowups". These 2 things together tell me that the "China bomb" story is a real one.

Definitely a belt separation. You can see the advantage of doing a dismount inspection but you are far enough along the evidence was visible on external inspection of tires.

I would collect full DOT serial including date from each tire. Your TT VIN and then file a complaint for each tire with NHTSA.
In the narative portion of the complaint all you really need to say is:
I have confirmed the tire laods are XXXXXX
I run the tires at yyyyy psi
I have photos showing the belt separation and a retired Tire Design Engineer has seen the pictures and in his opinion the tires have belt separations.

After the above you should also contact your tire dealer or whoever sold you the tires and ask what they are going to do about the tire failures.

You can psot the tire DOT serial here and I can tell you the exact tire company and location where the tires were made if you don't know how to look up the code.


While it might have been spectacular if the tires came apart at 55 mph the failure is a belt separation which is NOT a Run Low Flex Failure or Blowout.
The difference is sometimes difficult to understand for those who have not done failed tire inspections.
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