Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > 5th Wheel Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-05-2013, 02:54 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 51
Rubber propane hoses exposed on underbelly normal?

Our new Winnebago 5'er uses a black rubber flexible hose running across the underbelly of the trailer. It runs from the auto switch valve near one tank to a 2nd tank on the opposite side the the trailer. Should I worry about such a hose being exposed to the road surface or is this common on trailers?
__________________

__________________
mileshuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-05-2013, 02:58 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
trackman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,136
It is common and you should have no reason to worry. If you want peace of mind you can get water line insulation from Lowes or Home Depot the size of the propane line and cover them.
__________________

__________________
trackman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2013, 03:24 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Morganton, NC
Posts: 47
My 5er has black iron pipe where it is exposed.
__________________
brewurown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2013, 03:29 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,232
It used to be black iron pipe, but I've seen Coachmen trailers going to the rubber LP lines under the trailer. But I wouldn't really worry.
__________________
jesilvas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2013, 04:32 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar
 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 16,263
If it does leak, better to have it beneath the trailer than having it enclosed in underbelly. Can you say bomb?
__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2013, 05:18 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by BFlinn181 View Post
If it does leak, better to have it beneath the trailer than having it enclosed in underbelly. Can you say bomb?
While true my question was regarding the use of rubber hoses exposed to the road surface. I would think road debris and grime could easily puncture a rubber hose. I was expecting to see steel or iron pipe as all of my prior trailers have had.
__________________
mileshuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2013, 12:04 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
hjsdds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 330
The only reason why you shouldn't worry is because you will not put that many miles on the rig and mostly over pretty clean a debris free roads.
That's probably why they did it too.
On vehicles that have to be "reliable", like commercial trucks, critical hoses, lines, etc. are routed away from road debris, shredding tires, etc.
If that cannot be avoided a steel cased tubing is utilized. On my fifth there is a long underbelly run to forward heating units, it's a steel pipe.
I'm surprise about Winnebago, I was under the impression that this company was not in a habit of cutting corners.

hjs
__________________
hjsdds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 05:17 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Champlin, MN
Posts: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by mileshuff View Post
Our new Winnebago 5'er uses a black rubber flexible hose running across the underbelly of the trailer. It runs from the auto switch valve near one tank to a 2nd tank on the opposite side the the trailer. Should I worry about such a hose being exposed to the road surface or is this common on trailers?
Yes - IMHO you should indeed be worried. There is too much chance of road debris being kicked up and slashing through a rubber hose. My rig has steel gas lines where they run under the rig. If a rubber hose must be use for flex purposes, it should be protected by a metal shroud.

Jim
__________________
'05 NuWa 29.5 lktg HitchHiker II
'05 Chev 3500 4X4 Crew LB SRW Duramax/Alison
jamvir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 05:31 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar
 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 16,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamvir View Post
Yes - IMHO you should indeed be worried. There is too much chance of road debris being kicked up and slashing through a rubber hose. My rig has steel gas lines where they run under the rig. If a rubber hose must be use for flex purposes, it should be protected by a metal shroud.

Jim
But if you're 'moving down the road' any leak would be dissipated safely in the wake of the trailer. How many rubber gas lines have you seen damaged by road debris? Yes it would be nice if the underside of the rig was armor plated to prevent any possible damage, but then you'd need a tank to pull it.
__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 11:59 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Champlin, MN
Posts: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by BFlinn181 View Post
But if you're 'moving down the road' any leak would be dissipated safely in the wake of the trailer. How many rubber gas lines have you seen damaged by road debris? Yes it would be nice if the underside of the rig was armor plated to prevent any possible damage, but then you'd need a tank to pull it.
I haven't seen any rubber gas lines damaged - cuz I don't have any. Yes, the gas may dissipate before you stop, however, you will still be in for a big surprise when your appliances won't work. Steel gas lines don't add much weight...and the last time I checked, I didn't see any other lines that are rubber under the rig, so I guess the extra weight is not a big factor.

Jim
__________________
'05 NuWa 29.5 lktg HitchHiker II
'05 Chev 3500 4X4 Crew LB SRW Duramax/Alison
jamvir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 12:52 PM   #11
Moderator Emeritus
 
TXiceman's Avatar


 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Full Time, TX Home Base
Posts: 17,150
Blog Entries: 21
Personally, I'd change out the hose and clamp black iron pipe where exposed under the trailer. As a minimum, run copper and clamp it in place.

On gas lines use only flare connections and pipe thread (with the proper thread sealant). Do not use compression fittings or the white Teflon tape.

Ken
__________________
Amateur Radio Operator (KE5DFR)|Full-Time! - 2012 6.7L Ford Crew Cab Dually -2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38RLRSB - Travel with one Standard Schnauzer and one small Timneh African Gray Parrot
TXiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 07:36 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
hjsdds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXiceman View Post
Personally, I'd change out the hose and clamp black iron pipe where exposed under the trailer. As a minimum, run copper and clamp it in place.

On gas lines use only flare connections and pipe thread (with the proper thread sealant). Do not use compression fittings or the white Teflon tape.

Ken
I second that.

No, you can't expect for the RV to built like a tank or be so heavy that you have to pull it with a tank, sadly though the opposite is the "norm" in this industry. There is a lots of utter junk, particularly at the "entry-level", but the temptation to save a buck and cut corners gravitates quite a ways up the "price point scale" and this is another example, this time from Winnebago.
RV industry is at the same point as the car industry was in the 70's, when Chrysler almost went under. Lee Iacocca admitted years later that "we built lots of junk in the 70's". Remember the K cars from Chrysler, or the Citation from GM, or the Pacer from AMC, you can't find any of these "restored" or offered to car collectors at auctions. Or the $1,500 damage from 10 mph collision because bumpers were stamped out to work up to 5 mph, pure "decorations" until insurance companies went nuts.
It also took someone as crazy as Ralph Nader to embarrass everybody and the competition from foreign built cars that would last beyond the last coupon from the payment book.
There is no excuse for what Winnebago did on that rig. It involves safety and reliability and their savings cost wise were minimal. You see stuff like this and one wonders if the RV executives worked first for companies producing stuff sold at Dollar Stores or Flea Markets.

hjs
__________________
hjsdds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 08:54 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,232
On the other hand, how many times have you seen something that flew up and punctured the even softer corrugated plastic bellies? I never have.
__________________
jesilvas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 09:06 PM   #14
Moderator Emeritus
 
TXiceman's Avatar


 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Full Time, TX Home Base
Posts: 17,150
Blog Entries: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jesilvas View Post
On the other hand, how many times have you seen something that flew up and punctured the even softer corrugated plastic bellies? I never have.
A puncture of a plastic under-belly is pretty much a non-event, but puncturing a propane line can be a big event possibly resulting in afire.

Not a good comparison.

Ken
__________________

__________________
Amateur Radio Operator (KE5DFR)|Full-Time! - 2012 6.7L Ford Crew Cab Dually -2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38RLRSB - Travel with one Standard Schnauzer and one small Timneh African Gray Parrot
TXiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
propane



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.