Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > 5th Wheel Discussion
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-09-2016, 10:11 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 300
Good info here. I have 7k axles with 235/80R 16 and the factory tires are rated at 80lbs. I do not know if I have the high pressure wheels to handle the Sailuns. Are there any Sailuns rated for 3500 or more that do not require high pressure wheels or where can I find some nice high pressure 16" wheels? Can I switch to the 17.5" wheels or will they be taller?
__________________

__________________
Fishalaska1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-10-2016, 06:05 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
Franka548's Avatar
 
Retired Fire Service RVer's
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: N E Ohio
Posts: 2,822
The 215/75R17.5 tires are wider than your 235/80R16 tires but are slightly lower in height. As long as you have clearance between your tire and frame, and between the tire and outside body panels, you will be good. I switched over 4 years ago, and it was the best thing that I could have done, got rid of the Goodyear G614's. I have 7000# axles and a GVWR of 16,340#. I run the LRH tires at between 105 and 110# and have around 20,000 miles on them with zero problems. I use the Cooper Roadmaster series tires.
Frank
__________________

__________________
05 Alfa Gold 40' Motor Home "Goldie" 03 Malibu Toad towing 4 down
03 Silverado cclb 3500 drw, D/A, Reese 22k hitch
07 Alfa SeeYa Gold 30RL,2 slides,power everything Above for sale PM me for details
Franka548 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 07:04 AM   #31
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Rock Hill, SC
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by FastEagle View Post
Using replacement tires that are in conflict with tire industry standards or are not able to provide the load capacity of the Original Equipment tires are clear safety violations. As an owner thatís your choice. Bragging about it can be misconstrued as a recommendation for other owners to follow that unsafe path.


The LT load range 120 tires are rated higher than the actual axle load. ST Tires that continue to shred apart while I'm driving down the road are a safety issues with me. And clearly the tires I have with the higher capacity are unable to do their job!

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkey View Post
First,, I'm No tire expert,, but I understand this,,, on a dual axle trailer there is A Lot of sidewall stress when turning corners... Thats why a tire be it a ST or LT "rated" for trailer use will have a stiffer/stronger sidewall to withstand the side loads compared to LT tires that just have to "support" the load... If in doubt, start turning like into a rv parking spot, stop and go look at the side stress those tires are under... Your pickup won't see that stress...
Personally for our 15" wheels, I instantly got rid of the D rated "china bombs" and installed E rated Maxxis tires... So far I love them...
Monkey
I think my steering axle tires on my truck encounter much more stresses and deflection than the trailer tires will when turning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray,IN View Post
By "proper inflation" do you mean inflated to sidewall listed max. presssure?
ST tires have heavier sidewalls than LT tires to withstand the extreme stress placed on them by tight cornering, and consequently require maximum inflation.
The current tire that has the broken belts is at 80 psi. Tire pressures always checked and adjusted before the trailer moves. I have no TMPS (I would like to have one) but I know someone who does, it has alerted him to a few leaks but, he has also had catastrophic failures of the ST tires with no air pressure loss before failure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Franka548 View Post
The 215/75R17.5 tires are wider than your 235/80R16 tires but are slightly lower in height. As long as you have clearance between your tire and frame, and between the tire and outside body panels, you will be good. I switched over 4 years ago, and it was the best thing that I could have done, got rid of the Goodyear G614's. I have 7000# axles and a GVWR of 16,340#. I run the LRH tires at between 105 and 110# and have around 20,000 miles on them with zero problems. I use the Cooper Roadmaster series tires.
Frank
A 215 is narrower than a 235 but I am not planning on replacing the rims to 17.5.

Not sure how adding another no name tire with an even higher capacity is the answer, the ST tires I have now are carrying well below their capacity and continue to have catastrophic failures causing thousands of dollars damage in the process. The higher rated tires also require inflation pressure above my rims capacity.

I consider myself somewhat logical so...Why can't I choose between several major tire manufactures ST tires? Why don't any of the major tire manufactures produce trailer tires in the US? Why does a LT tire weigh so much more than a comparable size ST tire when the ST have such "a stiffer side wall" and have such a higher load capacity? Why can I run (per the tire manufacture) a LT tire on a trailer but a ST is for trailer use only? If the no name tire manufactures make such great products, how come you are not running them on your tow vehicle? They make tires in your size I bet. Why are ST tires only rated for 65 miles per hour?

I think the ST tires are way behind the development curve. The NTSB isn't too concerned about the failures as it has not resulted in too many cases of bodily injury.

Thanks again for all the responses! Think I'm going to look for a set of LT tires, whats the worst think that will happen, another tire failure? I'll take my chances.
__________________
2115 Salem Hemisphere Lite 368RLBHK
2004 Dodge 3500 DRW Crew 5.9L
Hatchet67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 07:23 AM   #32
Senior Member
 
wingnut60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Burleson, TX
Posts: 2,402
Back in early 2015, I changed my Suites tires to Sailun 17.5s--about 6k miles in '15, this year, trip to AK, 14k miles. The tires are doing just fine.
Have Sailun 19.5s on the 450 and they are doing fine also.
These are tough tires, but also 90psi and 125psi, so they ride rougher.
The trailer changeover to 17.5s was made in 2008 buying the entire tire/wheel setup from Trailer Tires and Wheels - Steel & Aluminum Trailer Wheels, Bias & Radial Trailer Tires in Edon, OH. Put Michelin LTXs on originally, they had tread separations after 4 years and deep checkering--no help from Michelin.
That was my last Michelin purchase.
My personal opinion on tire life is to have about 20% extra capacity over the minimum to carry the load, and run them at rated pressure.
Joe
__________________
'05 36TK3 Mobile Suites
'10 F450 new to me
'09 F450 Lariat 4x4--died
wingnut60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 07:33 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingnut60 View Post
Back in early 2015, I changed my Suites tires to Sailun 17.5s--about 6k miles in '15, this year, trip to AK, 14k miles. The tires are doing just fine.
Have Sailun 19.5s on the 450 and they are doing fine also.
These are tough tires, but also 90psi and 125psi, so they ride rougher.
The trailer changeover to 17.5s was made in 2008 buying the entire tire/wheel setup from Trailer Tires and Wheels - Steel & Aluminum Trailer Wheels, Bias & Radial Trailer Tires in Edon, OH. Put Michelin LTXs on originally, they had tread separations after 4 years and deep checkering--no help from Michelin.
That was my last Michelin purchase.
My personal opinion on tire life is to have about 20% extra capacity over the minimum to carry the load, and run them at rated pressure.
Joe
Joe,

Thats the best info yet right there. Thats what I needed. I will upgrade wheels and put the Sailuns on next week. Will they mount and balance and ship right to my door?
__________________
Fishalaska1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 08:01 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
Ray,IN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North America somewhere
Posts: 12,416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishalaska1 View Post
Good info here. I have 7k axles with 235/80R 16 and the factory tires are rated at 80lbs. I do not know if I have the high pressure wheels to handle the Sailuns. Are there any Sailuns rated for 3500 or more that do not require high pressure wheels or where can I find some nice high pressure 16" wheels? Can I switch to the 17.5" wheels or will they be taller?
The Sailun 16" S637 tires have a maximum pressure rating of 120 psi. Most 16" aluminum trailer rims have a maximum air pressure rating of 110 psi. Inflated to 110 psi, S637's will carry more load than standard load range E ST tires and still have a significant safety cushion for loading.
Trailer tires carry a fairly consistent load near or at their maximum rating. This appears to be common throughout the recreational trailer industry. This is another reason why ST trailer tires must be inflated to sidewall max. instead of using load/inflation charts.
BTW, NO tire manufacturer recommends running less air pressure than what the vehicle mfgr. recommends on their tire placard in the vehicle; IF you are still using the OEM tires.
__________________
2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA 1SG, retired;PPA,Good Sam Life member."We the people are the rightful masters of both the Congress and the Courts - not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow men who pervert theConstitution. "Abraham Lincoln"
Ray,IN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 09:21 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
FastEagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 660
[QUOTE=Hatchet67;3288585]
Quote:
Originally Posted by FastEagle View Post
Using replacement tires that are in conflict with tire industry standards or are not able to provide the load capacity of the Original Equipment tires are clear safety violations. As an owner that’s your choice. Bragging about it can be misconstrued as a recommendation for other owners to follow that unsafe path. (END QUOTE)



The LT load range 120 tires are rated higher than the actual axle load. ST Tires that continue to shred apart while I'm driving down the road are a safety issues with me. And clearly the tires I have with the higher capacity are unable to do their job!



I think my steering axle tires on my truck encounter much more stresses and deflection than the trailer tires will when turning.



The current tire that has the broken belts is at 80 psi. Tire pressures always checked and adjusted before the trailer moves. I have no TMPS (I would like to have one) but I know someone who does, it has alerted him to a few leaks but, he has also had catastrophic failures of the ST tires with no air pressure loss before failure.



A 215 is narrower than a 235 but I am not planning on replacing the rims to 17.5.

Not sure how adding another no name tire with an even higher capacity is the answer, the ST tires I have now are carrying well below their capacity and continue to have catastrophic failures causing thousands of dollars damage in the process. The higher rated tires also require inflation pressure above my rims capacity.

I consider myself somewhat logical so...Why can't I choose between several major tire manufactures ST tires? Why don't any of the major tire manufactures produce trailer tires in the US? Why does a LT tire weigh so much more than a comparable size ST tire when the ST have such "a stiffer side wall" and have such a higher load capacity? The weight is in the materials. A slightly larger tire with deeper treads, compounds that are designed for high mileage are more dense. Built-in sidewall protectors and sometimes an extra steel belt to help prevent punctures. And, don't forget, some LT tires are steel cased, retreadable and regrooveable. None of that stuff increases the tire's load capacity, just it's durability. The polyester materials in the ST tires are larger and provide more tire strength. The ST tires are not 100% stiffer than LT sidewalls. Each manufacturer designs a section stronger, normally center that is somewhat stiffer than the LT tire in that area. Why can I run (per the tire manufacture) a LT tire on a trailer but a ST is for trailer use only? If the no name tire manufactures make such great products, how come you are not running them on your tow vehicle? They make tires in your size I bet. Why are ST tires only rated for 65 miles per hour?

There is already a major change taking place in the ST tires speed rating. Almost all new tires from China MUST have a speed letter. Because there is no speed letter for 65 MPH most are building them to 75 MPH, letter "L".

I think the ST tires are way behind the development curve. The NTSB isn't too concerned about the failures as it has not resulted in too many cases of bodily injury.

Thanks again for all the responses! Think I'm going to look for a set of LT tires, whats the worst think that will happen, another tire failure? I'll take my chances.
See the orange.
__________________
USN - RET - PDRL - Aviation Structural Mechanic (H)
DOD - RET - Journeyman Aircraft Mechanic
SSA - RET
FastEagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 10:07 AM   #36
Senior Member
 
wingnut60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Burleson, TX
Posts: 2,402
Fishalaska1,
Yes, they will mount and balance and ship the set direct to you, altho it is somewhat cheaper in freight to have a commercial shop that you are friendly with to take the delivery first--but, yes, they ship direct to your home also.
You will find Scott very knowledegable about trailer tires and wheels and the changeout to larger wheels--and can/will answer questions straight up.
If you change to 17.5s, they will come with steel stems, and everything ready to mount. Then, clean up the old units and sell them on Craigslist.
You will need to know the bolt pattern of the hubs, and the diameter of the studs so he can provide the correct wheel.
You can keep one tire that is in best shape for a spare (not enough difference in size to not use it along with the new ones--if worst happens, you get a nail/ruined casing) but I honestly have had one puncture in the 17.5s in 7 years of towing--in the sidewall. I have found numerous nails/screws in the treads that never went all the way thru--these 17.5s are very deep in tread rubber.
Joe
__________________
'05 36TK3 Mobile Suites
'10 F450 new to me
'09 F450 Lariat 4x4--died
wingnut60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 10:29 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingnut60 View Post
Fishalaska1,
Yes, they will mount and balance and ship the set direct to you, altho it is somewhat cheaper in freight to have a commercial shop that you are friendly with to take the delivery first--but, yes, they ship direct to your home also.
You will find Scott very knowledegable about trailer tires and wheels and the changeout to larger wheels--and can/will answer questions straight up.
If you change to 17.5s, they will come with steel stems, and everything ready to mount. Then, clean up the old units and sell them on Craigslist.
You will need to know the bolt pattern of the hubs, and the diameter of the studs so he can provide the correct wheel.
You can keep one tire that is in best shape for a spare (not enough difference in size to not use it along with the new ones--if worst happens, you get a nail/ruined casing) but I honestly have had one puncture in the 17.5s in 7 years of towing--in the sidewall. I have found numerous nails/screws in the treads that never went all the way thru--these 17.5s are very deep in tread rubber.
Joe
His site says free shipping!!
__________________
Fishalaska1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 11:21 AM   #38
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 8,269
Quote:
Originally Posted by dayle1 View Post
But wait that same tire goes on so many trucks that also have a 6000 or 6100 lb GAWR. What's the diff ? There is no numerical margin in either case. And we don't know how much design margin there is for the truck or trailer axle/suspension. Or how much design margin there is in the LT tire either.
I have no idea if they are at capacity on a light truck. And if manufacturers install a 3020 tire on a 6000 axle. Does not seem legit to me.

I just checked our 150. I recently replaced the tires on it. Since it is our yard truck (light duty) we put lighter tires on it. The current tires are 2700 lbs on an axle rated for 3400 front and 3500 rear. The original tires were heavier.
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 11:35 AM   #39
Senior Member
 
wingnut60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Burleson, TX
Posts: 2,402
Fishalaska1,
Free is good, not that way several years back. Hope you get something worked out--I feel the single best thing that can be done to avoid most trailer tire failures is to utilize a tire that is sufficiently under the rated load to have a large safety margin.
Downside is having to make sure you have good air gauge to read above 125, and a source of air to 150psi when needed. I have found that a 125psi compressor just doesn't work well on a 125psi tire---kind of like a 3000lb load tire doesn't work well on a 3000lb load...
Joe
__________________
'05 36TK3 Mobile Suites
'10 F450 new to me
'09 F450 Lariat 4x4--died
wingnut60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 08:25 PM   #40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 921
Quote:
The Sailun 16" S637 tires have a maximum pressure rating of 120 psi.
Actually Sailuns websites says 110 psi max for both 16" ST G tires. Check it out.
I have six of them on a triaxle GN trailer and their 110 psi rated.
__________________
'03 Dodge 2500 Cummins HO 3.73 NV5600 Jacobs
'98 3500 DRW 454 4x4 4.10 crew cab
'97 Park Avanue RK 28' 2 slides
JIMNLIN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 08:33 PM   #41
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by JIMNLIN View Post
Actually Sailuns websites says 110 psi max for both 16" ST G tires. Check it out.
I have six of them on a triaxle GN trailer and their 110 psi rated.
Ya but I dont know if my aluminum wheels are rated to 110psi or I wouldnt need to buy new wheels.
__________________
Fishalaska1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 12:41 PM   #42
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Spicewood, Tx
Posts: 433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
I have no idea if they are at capacity on a light truck. And if manufacturers install a 3020 tire on a 6000 axle. Does not seem legit to me.

I just checked our 150. I recently replaced the tires on it. Since it is our yard truck (light duty) we put lighter tires on it. The current tires are 2700 lbs on an axle rated for 3400 front and 3500 rear. The original tires were heavier.
Most common LT tire on 3/4 ton trucks has a load capacity of 3042 lbs. My 1 ton has tires rated at 3525 lbs and a rear GAWR of 7050 lbs.

So trailers or trucks, if GAWR is very close to the OEM supplied tire capacity then it is the tires that set the GAWR limit. If tire capacity is higher than the GAWR then something else is the limiter and the excess tire capacity is unusable.

So I still feel that as long as tire capacity is equal to or greater than the axle rating then there is no safety issue even if replacement tires have less capacity than OEM, either truck or trailer.

In fact case in point, a friend has an F250 with optional tires/wheels. The tires are like mine rated for 3525 lbs. But his rear GAWR is only 6000 lbs. He could replace the OEM tires with the standard size tires that are rated 3042 lbs and still be legal and safe.
__________________

__________________
dayle1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tires


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Front headlights changed to BMW E39 series headlights Rippenrick Alpine Coach Owner's Forum 13 09-21-2013 12:07 AM
Series/Parallel or Parallel/Series rpasetto Monaco Owner's Forum 45 09-28-2011 01:52 AM
Series/Series Parallel CARVAL Motorsports MH-General Discussions & Problems 7 01-28-2009 01:02 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.