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Old 08-03-2016, 07:30 PM   #71
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Tire dealers and tire manufacturerís do not set the standards from which tires are fitted to a vehicle, the vehicle manufacturer is solely responsible for those settings.

A rim manufacturer or dealer does not determine what tire is a suitable fitment to their rims, the tire manufacturer is.

A tireís strength (load capacity) is dependant on the amount of inflation pressure used. Thatís why tire manufacturers provide tire inflation charts, so those responsible for setting correct inflation pressures have a guide.

A ST235/80R16G provides the same load capacity as the ST235/80R16E at say 80 PSI. There is no reason to buy the LRG tire if inflation pressures higher than 80 PSI are never used. A tires durability does not contribute to its strength.

On some unusual circumstance a vehicle manufacturer may allow a rim width not recommended by itís manufacturer to be used. In such cases the vehicle manufacturer would then be 100% responsible for that rimís uses.

The RMA has said that a tire with more load capacity/inflation pressure than a rim is certified to provide can be used but only up to the limits of the rim. That statement or similar writings can be found in the following reference.

http://www.mcgeecompany.com/wp-conte...ete-manual.pdf
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Old 08-03-2016, 11:02 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by Barlow46 View Post
Shelbytexan,
If you return to the start of this topic, you will see that his rims are not rated for the 110 psi. They are rated at 80 I believe so that is why he is running them near the capacity of the rims. It's not necessarily about the tires as he has select what is the best choice for him and losing the ability to air up to 110. He has said that his tire dealer and sailen are OK with this and the dealer will install them understanding the restrictions.
I agree he knows his limitations with the 80 psi wheels but how do you gain load capacity if you can only put 80 psi in the new tires which is the same as the old tires. You are basically running your tires low and will add heat to your tires if you run 80psi on a 110 psi tire. The best remedy as has been mentioned on this topic would be to buy 110 psi rims to match the 110psi tires. Keeping the tires as cool as possible should be of the utmost importance if you want to reduce tire problems. Running 110 psi tires at 80psi is over 27 percent lower than the max and would compare to an 80psi tire running at 58psi. Running a mismatched tire and wheel is not giving you the full benefit of the tire and could still cause you some problems down the road. It has been mentioned on this thread to run 17.5 rims and tires but this would be a overkill on account the g rated tires are a big step up from the e-rated he started with.
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Old 08-04-2016, 07:04 AM   #73
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Dogpatch,

You and I have similar trucks and trailers. We also have participated in discussions on the Cummins forum. I go by "dkrage" over there.

My 2014 Forest River Cedar Creek 36ckts is about the same size as your cardinal. It is rated at 16100 lbs gvw. It came from the factory with GY 614 (G) and 110 psi rated wheels from the factory. I bought my trailer used this March and did not know the mileage and specifics of how the trailer was used. Since I have a brother who owns a Goodyear dealership I (he) was able to push through a warranty claim for new tires. 5 new tires for 650.00. In addition, while the tires were off the rig, I upgraded to disc brakes.

My humble opinion is that Forest River increased the tire and rim capacities between your model year and mine for a reason... If I were in your situation I would choose to go bigger on both counts. You are running pretty close to the capacity of your wheels. Too close for my personal comfort... Yes, it means more $$, but if I recall you practically stole that trailer from the guy when you bought it so perhaps there is still a little coin laying around to spend on wheels??

BTW, after crossing the scales last week with my trailer in tow, I found that I am running with 3200 lbs on the pin. This puts my truck rear axle 200 lbs over it's 6500 lbs RAWR. I am now shopping for a dually...
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:20 AM   #74
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Originally Posted by shelbytexan View Post
I agree he knows his limitations with the 80 psi wheels but how do you gain load capacity if you can only put 80 psi in the new tires which is the same as the old tires. You are basically running your tires low and will add heat to your tires if you run 80psi on a 110 psi tire. The best remedy as has been mentioned on this topic would be to buy 110 psi rims to match the 110psi tires. Keeping the tires as cool as possible should be of the utmost importance if you want to reduce tire problems. Running 110 psi tires at 80psi is over 27 percent lower than the max and would compare to an 80psi tire running at 58psi. Running a mismatched tire and wheel is not giving you the full benefit of the tire and could still cause you some problems down the road. It has been mentioned on this thread to run 17.5 rims and tires but this would be a overkill on account the g rated tires are a big step up from the e-rated he started with.
Your theory is not correct. Tires perform exactly the same based on load. Lighter load requires less pressure heavier load requires more pressure.

Per GY tech support. Find the weight on each tire. Use the weight/inflation chart with the heaviest weight per axle now add 5psi.

If he ran 110psi he would have a VERY rough ride, less braking and center tread wear.

It says MAX on the tires for a reason and there are weight/inflation charts for every tire for a reason.
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Old 08-04-2016, 11:56 AM   #75
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I agree.

A lot of confusing, incorrect and misinformation floating throughout this thread about tire inflation.

Wheels have a MAX Cold Inflation Pressure. Do NOT inflate ANY tire mounted on the wheel beyond what the MAX Cold Inflation Pressure is for the wheel.

Tires have a MAX Cold Inflation Pressure. Tire manufactures also supply Load Inflation Tables for every tire that they make and sell.

You do NOT have to run tires at their MAX Cold Inflation Pressures.

It depends on the weight of the load, how many axles, how many tires, what positions they are located, etc, etc, etc.

Refer to the manufacturers Load Inflation Table for your Brand and Model of tire you are using to find the correct inflation pressure for your specific configuration.

If RV owners listened to some posts on this thread they would be shaking their heads literally from the roughness of their ride inside their luxury coach.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
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Old 08-04-2016, 05:55 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by Dr4Film View Post
I agree.

A lot of confusing, incorrect and misinformation floating throughout this thread about tire inflation.

Wheels have a MAX Cold Inflation Pressure. Do NOT inflate ANY tire mounted on the wheel beyond what the MAX Cold Inflation Pressure is for the wheel.

Tires have a MAX Cold Inflation Pressure. Tire manufactures also supply Load Inflation Tables for every tire that they make and sell.

You do NOT have to run tires at their MAX Cold Inflation Pressures.

It depends on the weight of the load, how many axles, how many tires, what positions they are located, etc, etc, etc.

Refer to the manufacturers Load Inflation Table for your Brand and Model of tire you are using to find the correct inflation pressure for your specific configuration.

If RV owners listened to some posts on this thread they would be shaking their heads literally from the roughness of their ride inside their luxury coach.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
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Old 08-04-2016, 06:19 PM   #77
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I can agree that the more psi the rougher the ride. I have an independent suspension so i don't notice it that much. My rv weighs 16200 loaded per cat scale and i know with 110 psi i am at max pressure per tire . I'm far from overloaded per tire but i have less heat build-up per tire with max pressure and larger safety factor. My tires do wear slightly more in the middle but i feel i can get 5 years out of these tires before i discard them. I have 12,000 miles on them now and they are nearly 2 and a half years old .I could run them with a little less air and get a little better ride but i feel safer with the max on account of heat build up. I run michelin tires on the front of my ram at max of 80 psi with tire capacity of 3085 lbs. MY front weighs over 5600 lbs which is over 2800 lbs per tire loaded or empty per cat scale. When i would stop to check my tires the front would be much hotter than any other tires on the truck or trailer.With 2800 lbs i am very close to the max per tire.You would think that since the front tires catch the most wind that the tires would be possibly the coolest but that isn't the case. I would think it would be worth a little rougher ride and a little more wear on the tire to keep your tires cooler especially in the southern part of the country where 100+ degrees are very common in the summer. I know the benefits of less air but i think the benefits of more air is greater. This may be one of those subjects where no one is wrong but how comfortable you are with your decision.There is merit to more or less air.
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Old 08-05-2016, 11:35 AM   #78
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Originally Posted by shelbytexan View Post
I can agree that the more psi the rougher the ride. I have an independent suspension so i don't notice it that much. My rv weighs 16200 loaded per cat scale and i know with 110 psi i am at max pressure per tire . I'm far from overloaded per tire but i have less heat build-up per tire with max pressure and larger safety factor. My tires do wear slightly more in the middle but i feel i can get 5 years out of these tires before i discard them. I have 12,000 miles on them now and they are nearly 2 and a half years old .I could run them with a little less air and get a little better ride but i feel safer with the max on account of heat build up. I run michelin tires on the front of my ram at max of 80 psi with tire capacity of 3085 lbs. MY front weighs over 5600 lbs which is over 2800 lbs per tire loaded or empty per cat scale. When i would stop to check my tires the front would be much hotter than any other tires on the truck or trailer.With 2800 lbs i am very close to the max per tire.You would think that since the front tires catch the most wind that the tires would be possibly the coolest but that isn't the case. I would think it would be worth a little rougher ride and a little more wear on the tire to keep your tires cooler especially in the southern part of the country where 100+ degrees are very common in the summer. I know the benefits of less air but i think the benefits of more air is greater. This may be one of those subjects where no one is wrong but how comfortable you are with your decision.There is merit to more or less air.
Contact GY Tech Support.
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Old 08-05-2016, 12:12 PM   #79
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I've read thru this thread and am curious....other than one mention why has a LT tire not been considered.....We replaced our china bombs with Micheline XPS rib after doing a search on the topic. I'm not saying all Chinese tires are garbage, but all ST tires are now Chinese. Sailuns and Maxxis appear to be the exception to the rue. but when it came down to it for our 5er, following a delamination incident we chose the XPS and so far so good. As I recall LT tires have a reserve capacity where ST do not.
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Old 08-05-2016, 08:57 PM   #80
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I've read thru this thread and am curious....other than one mention why has a LT tire not been considered.....We replaced our china bombs with Micheline XPS rib after doing a search on the topic. I'm not saying all Chinese tires are garbage, but all ST tires are now Chinese. Sailuns and Maxxis appear to be the exception to the rue. but when it came down to it for our 5er, following a delamination incident we chose the XPS and so far so good. As I recall LT tires have a reserve capacity where ST do not.
I've had the xps-ribs on an 38' 5th wheel with 6,000 pound axles. This is the best choice for 6,000 pound axles as the load capacity on these tires is i believe 3,000 pounds each. These tires are load range E -10 ply all steel radials. These tires weigh the same as the sailun 14 ply load range g tire which i believe is 62 pounds. If michelin made these in the load range G i believe they would sell very well. These tires are the best load range E tires on the market and are under rated. I believe the tread depth is 15/32 which is more than the sailuns.The original poster i believe was looking for more load capacity than the load range E. The michelin is close to 300.00 each so this is pretty pricey for 10 ply tires buy they are the cadillac of any tire for an rv if you can use them.
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Old 08-05-2016, 10:53 PM   #81
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I've had the xps-ribs on an 38' 5th wheel with 6,000 pound axles. This is the best choice for 6,000 pound axles as the load capacity on these tires is i believe 3,000 pounds each. These tires are load range E -10 ply all steel radials. These tires weigh the same as the sailun 14 ply load range g tire which i believe is 62 pounds. If michelin made these in the load range G i believe they would sell very well. These tires are the best load range E tires on the market and are under rated. I believe the tread depth is 15/32 which is more than the sailuns.The original poster i believe was looking for more load capacity than the load range E. The michelin is close to 300.00 each so this is pretty pricey for 10 ply tires buy they are the cadillac of any tire for an rv if you can use them.
Load capacity ~~
Carlisle 235/80/16 LR E are rated over 3400 at 80# and 235/85/16 LR E are rated over 3500. They have a comparable size LR F too but cannot recall the weight rating at 95#.
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Old 08-06-2016, 12:38 AM   #82
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I have been following this thread with great interest. Although I feel like I am more confused now than ever it has been very interesting and enjoyable to read. FWIW....I called the US distributor for Sailun's to get some additional information. I have attached a Sailun inflation chart that I received from them. As others on the forum have stated the rep I spoke with advised the tire manufacturers will NOT tell you where to run your tires at that that information can only come from and is the responsibility of the trailer manufacturer to determine. They also wouldn't advise if running them at a lower pressure would shorten the tire life or was bad for the tires.
Again, just providing this as a courtesy for Sailun owners. I love mine so far.

Steve

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Old 08-06-2016, 12:09 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by Fred1609 View Post
I've read thru this thread and am curious....other than one mention why has a LT tire not been considered.....We replaced our china bombs with Micheline XPS rib after doing a search on the topic. I'm not saying all Chinese tires are garbage, but all ST tires are now Chinese. Sailuns and Maxxis appear to be the exception to the rue. but when it came down to it for our 5er, following a delamination incident we chose the XPS and so far so good. As I recall LT tires have a reserve capacity where ST do not.
The debate revolving around ST or LT usage on RV trailers seems to be a never ending dilemma for most users.

Vehicle manufacturers have the sole responsibility for tire fitments on the vehicles they manufacturer. Tire manufacturers do not have the authority to use replacement tires not approved by the vehicle manufacturer as suitable for replacements unless they have been approved as suitable options.

Suitable optional tire selection lists for the automotive industry are common and all retailers have copies. There are no such lists for tire fitments to RV trailer axles, so, the tire retailer should always use replacements that are identified on the trailerís certification label or others that are approved by the trailer manufacturer.

Thatís basic tire industry standards. Agreement is always fogged with he said she said information.

GY has said their Marathon ST tires can have inflation pressures increased 10 PSI above sidewall pressures to increase the tireís speed rating to 75 MPH if not otherwise marked and the rim can withstand the extra 10 PSI. Can you do that to a Maxxis tire? Sure, but Maxxis does not approve that procedure for their tires. Point is, rules are rules and there are always those that will not follow them. All a poster can do is present what is acceptable and approved. Itís up to each individual owner to determine the degree of the safety envelope they want to travel in.

Note: The maximum load capacity a tire provides is displayed on itís sidewall. Itís what its manufacturer says it is. They test it and certify it.
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Old 08-06-2016, 03:49 PM   #84
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Well said. Maximum pressure means just that. If you feel you need more tire capacity than what the maximum tire pressure is then you need to find a different load rated tire such as the 17.5 inch.
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