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Old 06-27-2015, 03:42 AM   #15
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I would stick to the "ST" tires they are superior to any LT. The ST stands for Special Tire and have been designed specifically for RV Trailers. It's about the strength of the sidewall. Also always go up a load class Use G as an example rather than say E because they are more readily available.
Your take the load range of your four tires and it should equal the weight of your trailer.
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Old 06-27-2015, 05:55 AM   #16
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For a trailer with a weight of 16,000# and above, bite the bullet and go with 215/75R 17.5" LRH wheels and tires, you will eliminate the worry of tire problems. That size is readily available at most truck tire dealers, as they are used on commercial lowboy trailers. The LRG tires are not always carried at the dealers and you would have to wait a day or more for them to get one if you need one on the road.Another point, most of the manufacturers of heavier trailers have either gone the 17.5" route as standard or they are an option.
technobody,
I respectfully disagree with some of your statements, LRG tires are less likely to be on the shelf at a tire dealer than a LRE tire. Also most ST tires nowadays are junk and are much less desirable than an LT tire. ST tires can only be used for trailer service, where LT tires can be an all position tire. Now I will agree that the load ratings of the ST tires are higher than the LT for a given size and load rating, so one has to be diligent in getting the correct load rating for the trailer weight if going with an LT tire.
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Old 06-27-2015, 10:25 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Technobody View Post
I would stick to the "ST" tires they are superior to any LT. The ST stands for Special Tire and have been designed specifically for RV Trailers. It's about the strength of the sidewall. Also always go up a load class Use G as an example rather than say E because they are more readily available.
Your take the load range of your four tires and it should equal the weight of your trailer.
Some comments on your post. You failed to address the max inflation rating of the OE wheels which might be 80 psi not 110. It is not a good idea and may be unsafe to exceed the max load or inflation ratings of your wheels as catastrophic failure could occur.

I think you will find that Load Range E tires are more widely available than Load Range F or G.

"Load Range" is the term used to indicate the level of inflation a tire is designed for. This is like Ply Rating.
"Load Index" is a number like 112 or 123 that allows a comparison with the max load capacity of different tires when reading the actual load capability marked on a tire is too difficult to understand for some.
You can learn more HERE.

It is the load capacity for your tires as seen in the Load & Inflation tables that needs to exceed the measured load on each tire position.
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Old 06-27-2015, 10:27 AM   #18
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"Load rating" is not the same as "Load Range".

If we can't use the correct terminology there is the potential for misunderstanding.
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Old 06-27-2015, 12:43 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post

It is the load capacity for your tires as seen in the Load & Inflation tables that needs to exceed the measured load on each tire position.
Although a correct statement it’s very confusing to those that are not familiar with tire servicing. It leads a lot of readers to believe that they can inflate their tires below the vehicle manufacturer’s recommendations found on tire placards, certification labels and in their vehicle owner’s manual.

It’s nearly a 100% trailer manufacturer standard to set recommended tire inflation pressures to the value found on the individual tire’s sidewalls. Even those trailers having 8000# axles and using medium duty truck tires are set at the individual inflation pressure on the tire sidewall.

So where is the variability?

Logic: If the inflation pressure corresponds to the actual tire load according to the tire manufacturer’s load and pressure table, the tire will be running at 100% of its rated load at that pressure. This practice may not provide sufficient safety margin. Any air pressure loss below the minimum required to carry the load can result in eventual tire failure.

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Old 06-28-2015, 06:45 AM   #20
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I have seen most of the new 5th wheel trailers using an E rated tire but I just read an article that said that Keystone used a D rated tire on their Laredo .. WE have a Jayco TT and I"m pretty darn sure we have E rated... so why would Keystone use D rated tires on a larger unit?
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:13 PM   #21
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Although a correct statement it’s very confusing to those that are not familiar with tire servicing. It leads a lot of readers to believe that they can inflate their tires below the vehicle manufacturer’s recommendations found on tire placards, certification labels and in their vehicle owner’s manual.

It’s nearly a 100% trailer manufacturer standard to set recommended tire inflation pressures to the value found on the individual tire’s sidewalls. Even those trailers having 8000# axles and using medium duty truck tires are set at the individual inflation pressure on the tire sidewall.

So where is the variability?

Logic: If the inflation pressure corresponds to the actual tire load according to the tire manufacturer’s load and pressure table, the tire will be running at 100% of its rated load at that pressure. This practice may not provide sufficient safety margin. Any air pressure loss below the minimum required to carry the load can result in eventual tire failure.

FastEagle
We agree that TT should use the tire sidewall inflation but maybe for different reasons.

My tire engineering leads me to recommend actual inflation to be tire max to reduce the Interply Shear force experienced by the tire during operation. ( Google "Interply Shear tires" to learn more.)

The RV assemblers uses the same max inflation to allow them to use the smallest tire possible to meet the GAWR.

Ideally what should happen is the RV assemblers select a tire with at least 15% excess load capacity over GAWR but to also spec the tire max inflation.

I am not aware of anything in the DOT regulations prohibiting excess capacity.
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:45 PM   #22
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According to the specs on the OP's trailer, the dry axle weight is just under 9000 lbs. I would say that the axles are 6K, maybe 7K. If they are 6K, that would leave a little more than 3K lbs until the max weight is exceeded. I just replaced my GY Marathons after a near catastrophe. We went to pack the wheel bearings and noticed one of the tires was about 2 inches taller than the others. The inside belts had separated. We had it replaced, but ended up switching to the Michelin XPS RIB tire. LT235/85/16 LRE. From all of the reviews I have been reading, the GY tires are good for lighter trailers, but fail miserably with heavier trailers. My axle weight is 10,200 lbs loaded, but without food or drinks. The fresh tank was 1/3 full. Moving to a load range G or higher, the rims would need to be replaced as well. And that can get expensive. Jerry.
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Old 06-28-2015, 08:38 PM   #23
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After a lot of research and blowout of a Goodyear Marathon, I ordered 4 Michelin XPS Ribs for my 2013 Arctic Fox 29-5T. Unlike the original poster, mine weighs in at around 12,500 lbs. Max weight is 15,600.

LT tires are tested at a much more strenuous level. ST tires(Trailer Service) are not held to nearly as high a standard.

See: Performance Requirements

for details.
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Old 06-28-2015, 11:49 PM   #24
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According to the specs on the OP's trailer, the dry axle weight is just under 9000 lbs. I would say that the axles are 6K, maybe 7K. If they are 6K, that would leave a little more than 3K lbs until the max weight is exceeded. I just replaced my GY Marathons after a near catastrophe. We went to pack the wheel bearings and noticed one of the tires was about 2 inches taller than the others. The inside belts had separated. We had it replaced, but ended up switching to the Michelin XPS RIB tire. LT235/85/16 LRE. From all of the reviews I have been reading, the GY tires are good for lighter trailers, but fail miserably with heavier trailers. My axle weight is 10,200 lbs loaded, but without food or drinks. The fresh tank was 1/3 full. Moving to a load range G or higher, the rims would need to be replaced as well. And that can get expensive. Jerry.

Have you filed a complaint with NHTSA? If not then why would we expect tire quality to improve if there no recalls. There will never be a recall if there aren't complaints with full VIN and full tire DOT
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Old 06-28-2015, 11:52 PM   #25
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I have seen most of the new 5th wheel trailers using an E rated tire but I just read an article that said that Keystone used a D rated tire on their Laredo .. WE have a Jayco TT and I"m pretty darn sure we have E rated... so why would Keystone use D rated tires on a larger unit?
Could it be that they wanted to save themselves $20 cost on the TT?
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Old 06-29-2015, 05:25 AM   #26
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Tireman9, thanks for the comment, but, saving money isn't what I'd want to do, if I were caring a 9000lb 5th wheel behind me. Saying that does it seem D range tires are a bit low range for the application... the model in question is the Laredo 278SRL, I think the GVWR is actually 10,000 with a ULWR in the 8,000 lb area. Furthermore it seems like Keystone likes to use D rated tires as that is what seems to be on most of the models in that range? Would you consider this a dangerouse idea?
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Old 06-29-2015, 08:34 AM   #27
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I've been running the Michelin XPS RIBS for about a year and a half. Just returned on a 2000 mile plus trip and I tow pretty much at whatever the speed limit is and of course adjust for conditions, traffic, etc. So far, I'm happy with the Michelins and don't ever plan on using the crappy ST tires on my 5th wheels. I know of one person that has had a blowout with one of the XPS RIBS but the tire was over 7 years old and the trailer sets outside in the Texas heat. He replaced them all with XPS RIBS again.

I also just added a TPMS and to me that was money well spent. It really gives one a piece of mind towing and being able to see the temperature and pressure of your trailer tires and also the ability to be given an alert if either are abnormal.
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Old 06-29-2015, 08:51 AM   #28
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I have seen most of the new 5th wheel trailers using an E rated tire but I just read an article that said that Keystone used a D rated tire on their Laredo .. WE have a Jayco TT and I"m pretty darn sure we have E rated... so why would Keystone use D rated tires on a larger unit?
The D rated probably covers the GVWR of the trailer and Keystone saves a buck or two on every unit.

Keystone only needs the tires to get a new empty unit to their dealers.
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