Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > 5th Wheel Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-23-2013, 05:25 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
montana4two's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 299
You are half way there already. You love the outdoor life and you don't need a lot of "stuff". We have always been self sufficient and are quite ok by ourselves, but enjoy the company of others from time to time so this lifestyle fits us really well. Both the DH and DW should have interests independently of the other. This way you can "get away" from your partner when necessary.
Research the type of RV you want really well. It took me 2 years to narrow it down and then decide on the Montana 3400RL and have never regretted it. We putchased our truck first (Dodge 3500HD Cummins) and then we knew exactly what we could haul. We have met many people who have dually trucks and have a heck of a time parking it at shopping malls, etc., so consider that as well
Good luck, this is an exciting time for you....and the best is yet to come
__________________

__________________
Paul & Lorraine, Alberta, Canada
Live for today!
Blog: www.montana4two.wordpress.com
montana4two is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-24-2013, 12:28 AM   #16
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by AWise53 View Post
My wife and I are working towards full timing as well. We are still about 3 years out but I found this site to be really helpful. Considerations, cost factors, etc that really help in answering questions.

Could RV Living Be Your Dream? Let's Find Out!!

Good luck!
Will check this site out - looks great just glancing through it. Thanks!
__________________

__________________
ChrisM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 12:35 AM   #17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Groovy View Post
You've got the right idea -- get a starter rig first and then get a fancy one later. And camp as much as you can with the starter rig... (you say you've been camping a long time and by the description it sounds like you mean tent camping)...
Yes, tent camping. We love it though, except for cold weather over-night sleep. During the day time, hiking is actually pleasant when it is cool.

Quote:
While out there talk to the campground hosts (likely full-timers or at least long-termers), talk to other RV owners in the campground to find out how long they've had their unit, how often they use it, how they like it, how many others they've had, etc. If they are FT, invite them over for a beer at your site and learn as much as you can from them.
We never rally talked to our neighbors before. We should try that.

Quote:
Experiment with your own RV camping style -- how do you organize your things? how do you manage a small space with your spouse, what do you do all day? How do you plan your travels?

The more you use your first rig -- a simple and cheap one you can sell later -- the better informed you will be about what to get for a full-time rig.

Also, your first full-time rig may not be your last. We upgraded after our first year of FT. Once you are on the road full-time, it is a whole lot easier to visit manufacturers and dealerships to see how the rigs are made and to get the best pricing (it varies a lot state to state).

We found the best place to buy a truck was in Idaho at the Dave Smith dealerships. The best place to buy a fifth wheel was at the NuWa factory in Kansas.

So you may take your first starter rig on the road for your first months/year of FT and then get your new fancy rig once you have left your house behind... one advantage of this is that you will start FT with very little stuff (first rig is not that big). Then you will upgrade to your REAL full-time rig and will suddenly have lots of extra space to grow into...

We love the FT lifestyle. We have seen things we never would have seen otherwise, and our relationship has strengthened tenfold. Do it!!
Thanks for the suggestions, will keep them in mind.
__________________
ChrisM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 12:35 AM   #18
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dog Folks View Post
Best Advice? Start debt free!
Good idea. We are dept free right now, and would like to stay that way.
__________________
ChrisM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 12:39 AM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by missourijan View Post
You are starting out the right way, IMHO. We bought a 2000 Avion 5'r in 2005, we thought we would use it for vacations also. Then we put $$ for an option on 40 acres of land, we thought we would subdivide it to 10 acres each and build a house every 2 years. Well, when we used the Avion for vacations we never wanted to come home! We gave up the option on the land, sold our house and hit the road March 9, 2006. It's been great, no regrets. So glad we bought a used unit first,we have since bought 2 new units and believe that we have bought the last one. Good luck and go for it, buy a used anything and use it for the next few years, since you have camped before you aren't complete newbies, you'll know what's best for you. Good luck!
Nice. We really have no idea how long we will end up doing the full-timing, but we did talk about it. Perhaps we could do the full-timing for couple of years and switch to snowbird life style. But who knows, if we like the full-timing a lot, we may stay with that life style longer.
__________________
ChrisM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 12:46 AM   #20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by montana4two View Post
You are half way there already. You love the outdoor life and you don't need a lot of "stuff". We have always been self sufficient and are quite ok by ourselves, but enjoy the company of others from time to time so this lifestyle fits us really well. Both the DH and DW should have interests independently of the other. This way you can "get away" from your partner when necessary.
Research the type of RV you want really well. It took me 2 years to narrow it down and then decide on the Montana 3400RL and have never regretted it. We putchased our truck first (Dodge 3500HD Cummins) and then we knew exactly what we could haul. We have met many people who have dually trucks and have a heck of a time parking it at shopping malls, etc., so consider that as well
Good luck, this is an exciting time for you....and the best is yet to come
We are thinking of eventually getting something like GMC Sierra 3500HD with the Diesel engine, but SWR rather than getting the dually. It would be nice to have the 4 wheels at the back when towing but when not towing, I would think they are a real nuisance. We do expect to drive the truck in big cities even when we do full-timing so being able to park at somewhat tight spaces is important to us. I noticed that Sierra 3500HD isn't all that much bigger than F150.

I've been looking at 5w too - how long have you had your Montana? I'm also considering the Keystone Alpine which is very similar to yours but rated slightly more for colder weather (less insulation on the ceiling but more on the walls and the floor).

On the other hand, some swears by those models that are "certified" for full-timing - DRV, New Horizon, etc. But they are far more expensive. Are they worth the extra premium they ask over the Keystone high-end models?

Check this link out: 5w towable with Silverado 3500HD SWR
__________________
ChrisM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 06:53 AM   #21
Moderator Emeritus
 
SmokeyWren's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Midland County, Texas
Posts: 3,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisM View Post
On the other hand, some swears by those models that are "certified" for full-timing - DRV, New Horizon, etc. But they are far more expensive. Are they worth the extra premium they ask over the Keystone high-end models?
DRV, Excel, New Horizon, and a few others make "luxury" 5ers. More expensive counter tops, cabinets, appliances, fixtures, lights, furniture, beds, etc. Power leveling systems instead of manual or none. Well constructed = heavy, so it takes more tow vehicle to tow them without being overloaded. If you are used to the finer things in your home, then you might think they're worth it in your RV.

Travel Supreme was one of the luxury RV manufacturers for years, but they went under a few years ago. If you look at used RVs, you might find a Travel Supreme for sale. But don't fall in love with it if you hope to tow it with an SRW pickup without being overloaded.

Artic Fox makes "certified" full-timing RVs that cost less than the same size RV in a DRV or Excel. They are nice but not as luxurious and not as heavy as the "luxury" class of full-timing RVs.
__________________
Grumpy ole man with over 50 years towing experience. Now my heaviest trailer is a 7,000-pound enclosed cargo trailer, RV is a 5,600 pound Skyline Nomad Joey 196S, and my tow vehicle is a 2012 F-150 3.5L EcoBoost SuperCrew.
SmokeyWren is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 07:05 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
bigmichael's Avatar
 
Excel Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 352
Hi Chris,

Lots of good advice here-some not so good IMHO, but hope I can add something to the conversation.

We've been FTing for 6 years now, and love having the chance to offer up our thoughts and experiences when folks are curious. So do take advantage of the forums and talking to people when your out-most of us love to help if we can.

First, let me offer up what I think was the ONE BEST PIECES OF ADVICE we received from full-timers when we were exploring the lifestyle. "Try it out for at least 7 or 8 months before you take the plunge, sell the house, and get rid of all the stuff." Like you, we had tons of "camping" and RV experience, but were continuously told full-timeing was a lifestyle change, much different than any of our previous camping. And it is so true. So we got someone to take care of the house and property, and hit the road for 8 months.

We returned, sat down at the table over a cup of coffee, and said, OK-now what do we really think? And my DW said, "lets sell the house and do it. If we are really going to see all the places we are talking about, and the traveling we want, the house seems like a BIG ANCHOR". And the rest is history.

So while for us it ended in us doing what we had thought we wanted to do from the beginning-we have since run into enough people who it didn't or isn't working for that we know the trial run was a good idea.

Someone suggested you can easily get a new truck and new fiver for 100000. While this is true, I would respectfully suggest that you can't get a new truck and fiver that will satisfactorly meet your FT'ing needs for that price.

I think some people who don't FT, severely underestimate the difference in wear and tear on a rig when using it on weekends, or vacations, even 6 months snowbirding where they pull it south in the winter, park it, and move it north in the summer and park it. Living in the rig, 365-24/7 is an entirely different situation. And if you truly intend to travel constantly, which is what we do, multiply that wear.

FTing like that is where the differences in build show up. Get past the glitz, as that stuff is all the same. Box frames vs I beams, solid wood cabinetry vs vinyl wraps or particle board, fiberglass roofs, 8000 # axels vs 6000 # etc etc etc. This also is why the rigs that seem to hold up the best for FTing are also the heaviest. If it were me, I would seriously consider getting a quality used rig than a new one that you might end up being unhappy with in your new lifestyle.

As many have already said, FTing is not for everybody. And you both need to want to do it, or it won't work. We've met a few couples on the road over the years who have reinforced that notion for us. But if it works for you, I can't tell you enough about the adventures you have ahead of you. We are still absolutely loving it! The things we never would have seen, or in many cases even knew existed, are too numerous to mention. New friends, spontaneity, adventure, just a few of the things that come with making the jump.

Good Luck! Continue exploring and asking the questions you are and your going to have a great time.
__________________
2013 EXCEL LTD 36RKM
2014 F350 Dually Lariat 4x4
Sir Reginald the Cat who lets Big Mike and Jean travel with him.
bigmichael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2013, 10:46 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
montana4two's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 299
We bought our Montana 3 years ago. It is a 2006 3400RL. Coming from Alberta we do not stay there for the winter, -30 in an RV is not what we signed up for! We have been as cold as -10C and still keep warm. The past winters have been on Vancouver Island where the damp can be as bad as the cold. We can still keep the inside temperature at a comfortable 19C mostly with an electric radiator type heater and a de-humidifier, an essential in British Columbia. We love the Montana because of its cupboard space. Also the u-shaped kitchen makes it wasy to hide all my appliances within easy reach. Good luck on your hunt for a new home!
__________________
Paul & Lorraine, Alberta, Canada
Live for today!
Blog: www.montana4two.wordpress.com
montana4two is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2013, 07:34 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
caissiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,312
We have similar mdel unit by Heartland and love it. Tow easily with the Ford F250 6.0l diesel. It was also great in our previous Glendale 34ft unit but had limited storage and tires were limited with 5k axles. At 15 years old we traded it for the present one. After 4 years we are not planning to trade either truck or trailer. It was more trouble to go through the 1st year but everything is good now. Our unit is now better then new and with the modifications will be very comfortable for the next 10 years. We will asses it then. But we do have dual pane windows and mostly manual options that I prefer with less maintenance requirements. The TV is also one of the last standard tranny model.
Oh yes we have been full timing in the units now for 8 years. And carry many things for our hobbies like 3 kayaks 3 guitars and sound equipment, 3 computers and loads of art supplies and we do have W/D for the post 8 years and would not go without.
__________________
Barbara and Laurent, Hartland Big Country 3500RL. 39 ft long and 15500 GVW.
2005 Ford F250 SD, XL F250 4x4, Long Box, 6.0L Diesel, 6 Speed Stick, Hypertech Max Energy for Fuel mileage of 21 MPusG empty, 12.6 MPusG pulling the BC. ScangaugeII for display..
caissiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2013, 01:27 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: South West Michigan
Posts: 394
Whatever you get make sure it has a heat pump set your thermostat and as long as it's above about 28 it'll be wherever you set it
__________________
mikell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2013, 06:35 PM   #26
Junior Member
 
Smitty8934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 29
The advise about getting a setup and trying a seasonal site was what we chose. I believed 100% that I wanted to sell everything I owned when I retired and buy at least a 40ft. DP and hit the road. We've camped for years and now own a 39 ft FW and a Dodge Diesel to tow with. Two years ago We rented a seasonal site appx. 15 miles from our home and work and have spent as many summer days in it as we possibly can while we are still working. Last year we upgraded from a 36ft cougar to a 39 ft Jayco which we both really like a lot. Having the seasonal site so close, we have had a lot of time to spend in it. What we have realized, is that we would not want to live in it 24/7. We would not mind 6 months or maybe even a year and a half on the road. What we would not want is to not have a home base. This past November we purchased our retirement home in our same location. We bought a 1400 sq foot manufactured home with attached garage. We have it in a quiet subdivision where we rent our lot. It's on a wooded lot and we both love the down sizing we did. We had a moving sale and sold over $10k worth of stuff. What a cleansing. Although we still own our other home we are hoping that it will sell in a reasonable time. Having the FW close at hand in a great RV park allows us the best of both worlds. We move it on vacations and hit the road but always have it available for weekends or even weekdays as we can still handle the 15 mile drive to work. Hopefully in a couple years, retirement will happen and we can use it more, especially during the winter months and head where it's warm as we live in the U.P. of Michigan, which we feel is God's country during the summer months. Our new home is paid for but we still owe a few bucks on the FW. Should have that wrapped up before retirement. Can't wait to enjoy the FW more.
__________________
Smitty8934 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 09:50 PM   #27
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 19
we went full time 5 years now we love it stay where it is warm not hot or cold i dont like cold weather it starts getting cold i go south no more property tax or school tax just tags for rv and truck we gave the kids what thay wanted sold the rest or home addrest is at my doughter house she sends the male we do all or besness on the comp and cell we go when we wont to and stay if we like
__________________
phil branch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 01:08 PM   #28
Member
 
life2short's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 46
We are just rolling into our thirties and sold everything we had so we could travel with our kids for a year and spend good quality time with them before they enter school. We have fallen in love with it, mainly the simplicity, and the other people. We are reevaluating currently if we want to buy a house, we are contemplating staying in a RV and traveling whenever they aren't in school, we don't want to home school.

Just because your still working doesn't mean you can't work towards fulltiming, and travel on the weekends, until you retire then your already to go.

If I had a 100k to spend I would buy a new truck, cost you around 50k and a late model around 2005-08 Teton, you shop it good you can pick one up for around 30-40k.
Here's an example, of a nice Teton that not to big an you can get in alot of places with.
__________________

__________________
life2short is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
rving



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.