Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > 5th Wheel Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-01-2013, 04:13 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 99
Why do fifth-wheels vs. TT have so many more slide-outs? Construction/design factors?

Why do fifth-wheels have so many more slide-outs? Construction/design factors? What is the basis for the various differences in such layout and structural features.

The on-the-road advantage of a fifth-wheel is obvious physics. But I'm not as clear on why travel-trailers so rarely have the many slide-out features of fifth-wheels.

On the face of it all, one might expect a travel-trailer to have the most headroom--- and have it everywhere.

I do understand that a "boxy" travel trailer has the potential of falling under state-by-state definitions of a traditional "mobile home" and thereby losing various RV property tax advantages etc. But I assume most of the travel trailer issues arise from the highway physics and that ends up dictating most of the TT vs. 5Wh differences. (???)
__________________

__________________
FT'er,38' 5W/ToyHauler but no toys; rural eastern Texas 140mi.from Houston coastline.[On-grid gray/black-water code-compliant.] Interested in feedback re: climate/mold issues, vermin/pests/coyotes, energy-conservation tech & experiments, passive solar, RV security.
PaulAllen is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-01-2013, 04:26 PM   #2
Junior Member
 
Infinityrver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 26
First and for most, the tow vehicle (truck) can handle more weight over the axle than on the outer rear of the bumper.

Therefore, the fifth wheel can have more GVWR than a travel trailer. Thus, adding more slides, larger wastewater capacities, & more storage area. Just to name a few.
__________________

__________________
Dave & Patty
2012 Infinity 3850RL
2011 Ford F-350 4x4 FX-4 Crew cab 6.7 Diesel
Infinityrver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 12:05 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Champlin, MN
Posts: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinityrver View Post
First and for most, the tow vehicle (truck) can handle more weight over the axle than on the outer rear of the bumper.

Therefore, the fifth wheel can have more GVWR than a travel trailer. Thus, adding more slides, larger wastewater capacities, & more storage area. Just to name a few.
My thoughts exactly. I can't think of any other reason, other than perhaps keeping the cost lower.

Jim
__________________
'05 NuWa 29.5 lktg HitchHiker II
'05 Chev 3500 4X4 Crew LB SRW Duramax/Alison
jamvir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 12:17 PM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
RustyJC's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Cypress, Texas USA
Posts: 8,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulAllen View Post
I do understand that a "boxy" travel trailer has the potential of falling under state-by-state definitions of a traditional "mobile home" and thereby losing various RV property tax advantages etc.
I believe HUD sets the breakpoint between an RV and a mobile home at 400 square feet of floorspace. In addition, a mobile home will not have the fresh and waste water tanks and other support systems to allow mobility that a 5th wheel or travel trailer does.

Rusty
__________________
2016 Ram Longhorn 3500 Dually 4x4 CCLB, 385/900 Cummins, Aisin AS69RC, 4.10
2014.5 DRV Mobile Suites 38RSSA #6972
Come join us on a TEXAS BOOMERS rally!
RustyJC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 04:58 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyJC View Post
I believe HUD sets the breakpoint between an RV and a mobile home at 400 square feet of floorspace. In addition, a mobile home will not have the fresh and waste water tanks and other support systems to allow mobility that a 5th wheel or travel trailer does.
Yes, I've been surprised at how many people reacted to my step-father's forum questions by telling him it made no sense for him to buy a fifth-wheel for his rural, permanent site when it should be obvious that sometimes an RV is the only legal, zoning-compliant solution. Most states won't even allow a traditional outhouse anymore, regardless of location.
__________________
Helping my disabled father and my care-giver sister in getting their fifth-wheels for a long-term, rural Texas site. I hope to do likewise within a year or two so...just trying to learn all that I can. Any & all advice is appreciated!
NathanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 05:01 PM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
 
RustyJC's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Cypress, Texas USA
Posts: 8,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanJ View Post
...by telling him it made no sense for him to buy a fifth-wheel for his rural, permanent site when it should be obvious that sometimes an RV is the only legal, zoning-compliant solution....
With all respect, it wasn't obvious until he told us that his choice of a 5th wheel was mandated by zoning restrictions. Barring such restrictions, there are other options that could provide more "bang for the buck".

Rusty
__________________
2016 Ram Longhorn 3500 Dually 4x4 CCLB, 385/900 Cummins, Aisin AS69RC, 4.10
2014.5 DRV Mobile Suites 38RSSA #6972
Come join us on a TEXAS BOOMERS rally!
RustyJC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 07:06 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyJC View Post
With all respect, it wasn't obvious until he told us that his choice of a 5th wheel was mandated by zoning restrictions. Barring such restrictions, there are other options that could provide more "bang for the buck".

Rusty
True indeed. But in much of the U.S. even rural sites for anything but a conventional stick-built home are disallowed. I had thought that Texas was be among the easiest to put a large range of resident-types on unincorporated rural properties---but, sadly, many of us have discovered much to the contrary.

It is quite sad that a property owner nowadays can find onerous restrictions even in very remote locations. (And in so many agricultural areas, even adding a stick-built home for children/grandchildren is often disallowed because, for example, a 120 acres farm might be limited in perpetuity by the county to a single 2-acre "division" of the property.)

A lot of jurisdictions now dislike the idea of any kind of permanent housing because it complicates future decisions for that zoning unit (e.g.., eminent domain costs.) So some will grudgingly allow an RV because it can be driven away. But even then, for example, many will set various levels of the flood plain rules under which every RV must be capable of being towed away on short-notice of likely flood conditions. FEMA et al are increasingly concerned that manufactured housing easily leaves its foundation and either clogs or wipes out a low bridge further downstream.

So just as not many auto shoppers will be likely to consider motorcycle options when asking about installing a cruise-control, most rural sites in the U.S. have far fewer housing alternatives than we might all wish. A lot of basic freedoms have been lost to bureaucracy and micro-management by not only cities, villages, and neighborhood covenants but county commissioners and state legislatures harassed by eco-warriers, greens, and sustainability advocates. (Ironically, the actual results of such lobbying often confirms and worsens the status quo in terms of sustainable/economical lifestyles.)

Thank you all for your feedback and answers!
__________________
Helping my disabled father and my care-giver sister in getting their fifth-wheels for a long-term, rural Texas site. I hope to do likewise within a year or two so...just trying to learn all that I can. Any & all advice is appreciated!
NathanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 07:22 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 31
FUNNY STORY: There's a letter posted online illustrating the craziness of rural over-regulation and "environmental advocacy" in rural areas. It is an official "letter of judicial determination" by a Texas judge addressed to the filer of a complaint to the county commissioners that a farmer was leasing his woodlands to weekend-only hunters [i.e., no cabins, camping privileges, or other occupancy rights were included] "without constructing appropriate restroom facilities which would obviously be necessary for all-day visitors to the property" and that this "threatened the local ecosystem and posed a sanitation and public health risk to the community." The judge's tongue-in-cheek but very official sounding letter of determination informed the complainant that there had also been reports of woodland animals defecating in that same woodland property without any sewage treatment provisions being made by the property owner nor even the prominent posting of signs prohibiting such reckless abuse by a great many four-legged and winged visitors to the property in question.

Because of State of Texas law, the judge and county officials had to go through the motions of the costly process in order to avoid a nuisance lawsuit (and the media-attention seeking antics of the environmentalists in this case) but if Texas hasn't gotten this restricted, it is easy to imagine how much worse it is in other states where I've tried to subdivide or improve rural properties.

Of course, for many of us, it also comes down to property tax issues. The moment a structure is "fixed" and "permanent", it becomes subject to hefty taxes, brings zoning and code implications, and can create a long chain of undesirable and expensive complications. I have found this to be the case with virtually EVERY rural site I've either owned or investigated in six states. So I think we all like to think in terms of (and long for) a status quo which no longer exists.....or at least I do.
__________________
Helping my disabled father and my care-giver sister in getting their fifth-wheels for a long-term, rural Texas site. I hope to do likewise within a year or two so...just trying to learn all that I can. Any & all advice is appreciated!
NathanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 02:03 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Idaho Falls, ID, USA
Posts: 405
Because of the cantilever of the front o’hang the frame of a 5W has to be much stronger to begin with than the frame of a TT. Then remember, when you add a slide out you are eliminating the structural strength of the wall where the “hole” is.
__________________
2005 Dodge, 2500, auto, 2wd. Pac brake PRXB. CB, Max Brake Brake Controller, Rhino Lining, Aero 60 gal. replacement tank.
1998 Hitchhiker ll, mod#31RLBGBW, RBW L'tl Rocker Hitch, Generac NP50 G generator
richardcoxid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 02:16 PM   #10
Registered User
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 1,857
The market.

My observation is that there are more 'high end' fifth wheels than TTs.

Fivers seem to be the home of choice for full timers. Walk around any RV park that has permanent residents and you'll probably see the same pattern.
__________________
Muddypaws is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 03:35 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muddypaws View Post
My observation is that there are more 'high end' fifth wheels than TTs.

Fivers seem to be the home of choice for full timers. Walk around any RV park that has permanent residents and you'll probably see the same pattern.

I noticed likewise. Yet I've had a several people on Internet forums tell me that I should be looking at travel-trailers as well as fifth-wheels. Yet, because I want lots of square footage, storage, and slide-outs, I've yet to see a TT that met my needs. My RV will probably stay on a single rural site long-term and not spend much time on the highway so that may give me more flexibility about weight and towing considerations but I just don't see any viable alternative from a fifth-wheel.
__________________
NancyW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 10:22 PM   #12
Registered User
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 1,857
Park Models?

Have you looked at Park Models? They are towable, but just barely. To me they seem more like a small mobile home than a travel trailer. We've seen some really nice ones. Even some with second story lofts!
__________________

__________________
Muddypaws is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
slide



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.