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Old 02-15-2016, 08:34 PM   #15
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We have been looking at all of our options for a tt and really like the 35' Forest River 282rk Wildwood -hg. The gvw is from 8521 - 9500. (Depending on which site you look at).
Per the manufacturer (Wildwood Heritage Glen Travel Trailers by Forest River RV) the unloaded vehicle weight (UVW) is 6799 and the cargo carrying capacity (CCC) is 2701, or a total GVWR of 9,500. If that wet and loaded trailer has average tongue weight, then it will have 13% tongue weight or 1,235 tongue weight plus another 100 pounds for so for a good weight-distributing/sway control hitch for a total of about 1,335 hitch weight when the trailer is wet and loaded to the max for an RV trip.

http://www.forestriverinc.com/ImageH...x?ImageID=5964

That floorplan is almost identical to our 2000 Keystone Sprinter 250RK we drug for about 100,000 miles all over the lower 48 states. GVWR was 7,900 and we towed it with an F-250 diesel that had GVWR of only 8,800 pounds. But the Wildwood 282RK is about 3 feet longer and 1,600 pounds heavier, so it would overload my F-250 and I would not want to tow it with my F-250. However, the late-model F-250s have more payload capacity and pulling capacity than that old '99.5.

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Our dilemma is what tow vehicle to get. Is a 250 ok? Or do we need a 350?
Late model F-250 has GVWR of 10,000 pounds. Subtract 1,335 pounds hitch weight and that leaves 8,665 for max weight of the wet and loaded truck before exceeding the payload capacity of the tow vehicle. That should be easy to do, even with the heaviest configuration of CrewCab 4x4 diesel hauling a small family with some tools and a jack, but not much other weight in the bed.

F-350 with single rear wheels (SRW) has 1,500 pounds additional payload capacity, with no downside other than few bucks up front. So while the F-250 might be close to maxed out of payload capacity with a wet and loaded truck and trailer, the F-350 SRW would have plenty payload capacity. You could probably even haul a bed load of dry campfire wood without being overloaded. (My crew tends to burn lot and lots of campfire wood.)

Both the F-250 and F-350 SRW with diesel engine have the same GCWR of 23,500 because they have the same engine and drivetrain. The GCWR (and tow rating) indicates how much total weight your drivetrain can PULL without breaking a sweat. But the GCWR is not your limiter - the GVWR and payload capacity is your limiter for an F-250, and probably for an F-350 SRW. The gross weight of the trailer is limited by the hitch weight the tow vehicle has to HAUL, not by the weight of the trailer.

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Gas or diesel?
The diesel will cost you more up front, but you'll probably get it all back and then some when you trade it in later. Check out the price of 4 or 5 year-old pickups and you'll see what I mean. I bought a new 1999.5 diesel for $30k and sold it 11 years later with 200,000 miles on it for $10k. You cannot do that with a gasser.

So for a towing machine that will be towing a 9,000 to 9,500-pound trailer, I'd vote for the F-350 SRW with diesel engine.
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Old 02-15-2016, 08:57 PM   #16
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The diesel will cost you more up front, but you'll get it all back and then some when you trade it in later.
Seems to me that the OP is not thinking about trade in value, mentioned this will be their last vehicle they buy (barring some catastrophe, of course).

If that is correct, get the diesel. You will not be disappointed in what it does, and how well it does it, when pulling a trailer.
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Old 02-16-2016, 02:12 AM   #17
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Thanks again for all the input. So much to think about.
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Old 02-16-2016, 01:42 PM   #18
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When it comes to diesel equipped trucks, there is very little difference between 3/4 ton and 1 ton. Tires, wheels and rear spring pack, oh and the label on the door stating the GVWR number. In fact, you can option up a 3/4 ton with the same tires, wheels and springs as the 1 ton. But the lower GVWR number will remain.

This is why there is very little price difference between the two trucks. But in some cases, the 1 ton will not have as many standard features as the 3/4 ton (at the same trim level). I don't know about current model year, but in 2013, federal law required factory tire monitor systems on 3/4 ton trucks but not on the 1 tons.

Anyway, there is almost no reason not to get a 1 ton, at least when it comes to diesels, except maybe availability. If empty ride to too harsh, just lower the tire pressure a few pounds. There may be bigger differences between 3/4 ton and 1 ton gas trucks, IDK.
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Old 02-17-2016, 11:32 AM   #19
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"Anyway, there is almost no reason not to get a 1 ton, at least when it comes to diesels"

Disagree!

With RAM for example the only way to get the Aisin transmission is in the 3500. The only way to get the 385HP/900TQ is in the 3500. The only way to get the "heavy duty" factory rear air ride is the 3500. 3500 rear axle rating is 7,000# in SRW, 2500 rear axle rating is 6,000# Towing is the same but it all comes down to rear axle rating as in what it can carry.
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Old 02-17-2016, 01:03 PM   #20
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"Anyway, there is almost no reason not to get a 1 ton, at least when it comes to diesels"

Disagree!

With RAM for example the only way to get the Aisin transmission is in the 3500. The only way to get the 385HP/900TQ is in the 3500. The only way to get the "heavy duty" factory rear air ride is the 3500. 3500 rear axle rating is 7,000# in SRW, 2500 rear axle rating is 6,000# Towing is the same but it all comes down to rear axle rating as in what it can carry.
I don't think that we are disagreeing
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Old 02-17-2016, 01:24 PM   #21
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I don't think that we are disagreeing
Oh, going back a few years, what was that rule in school, two negatives makes a positive??
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Old 02-17-2016, 01:51 PM   #22
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Trucks towing and payloads have changed alot in the last few years. I just made a truck purchase and what i came to the conclusion during my search was that if i wanted to tow a 10,500 # or heavier 5th wheel I should consider a diesel dually. Under that weight the preference (because of cost and lesser payload capacity) should be gas. Diesels will have more torque but the other benifits are minimal and i felt It unnecessary.
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Old 02-17-2016, 02:09 PM   #23
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If you're talking about Fords, there is almost no practical difference between the F250 and F350, except that the F350 has a higher sticker rating for towing. The components are virtually the same.

For example, all F350's come with overload springs; only F250's with certain options come with the overloads. However, I'd recommend getting airbags regardless, in which case the overload springs shouldn't come into play anyways. Do some Google searches and you can find the other differences, but there aren't many.

Having said that, the F350 doesn't cost much more than the F250, so I would lean towards buying the F350. Although in reality you're just paying extra for a higher towing sticker. In my case, I ended up with an F250 because there were a lot more F250's available and I couldn't find the option packages I wanted on an F350.
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:01 PM   #24
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If you're talking about Fords, there is almost no practical difference between the F250 and F350, except that the F350 has a higher sticker rating for towing. The components are virtually the same.

For example, all F350's come with overload springs; only F250's with certain options come with the overloads. However, I'd recommend getting airbags regardless, in which case the overload springs shouldn't come into play anyways. Do some Google searches and you can find the other differences, but there aren't many.

Having said that, the F350 doesn't cost much more than the F250, so I would lean towards buying the F350. Although in reality you're just paying extra for a higher towing sticker. In my case, I ended up with an F250 because there were a lot more F250's available and I couldn't find the option packages I wanted on an F350.
For us, the price difference between an F250 and the 350 was less than the cost of a spray in bedliner. But, we did a factory order rather than just make a choice from something on the lot...
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:22 PM   #25
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I just love this sort of nonsense.
250/2500 series will work just fine for this TT. However if after a year or so you decide its just not enough and wind up upgrading you very well could be forced to upgrade trucks too. So why not simply buy your next truck the first time. Go for a 350/3500.

Ya but reading this thread I was basically right lol😀
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:24 PM   #26
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Thanks a bunch. I really appreciate your advice. It looks like we will go with a 350 but not sure we can afford the diesel. TBD later. Thanks again.
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:51 PM   #27
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Ram had a deal this fall that they discounted the cost of the diesel upgrade, so you could buy it for the cost of the gas. Now if only the price of diesel at the pumps was less than gas!
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:56 PM   #28
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I don't think that we are disagreeing

You people with such big words.
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