Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-12-2014, 09:46 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Dripping Springs, TX
Posts: 162
I'd recommend you do your homework first. Look at the 5'vers to see what you can live in. I'd recommend an Excel Limited or Winslow, Artic Fox, DRV, Montana, New Horizons are probably the best for full timing. The frame and build quality is what makes the difference long in a full timer. You'll likely find out that you'll at a minimum want a 350 SW, but if it were me, I'd go with a 350 DW. This is a good challenge to have.

Listen to the old timers, they know what they're talking about.
__________________

__________________
Brian & Pam Grateful for our travel adventures.
Big B is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-12-2014, 10:03 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
iawoody2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 201
The op states that he lives alone and will stay within his state of Florida, and only move 4 or 5 times a year. He doesn't need the expense of a big diesel dually. A F250 within the 6.2 gas and 4.10 rear axle would work just fine. Not many mountains in Florida. I know it would be just fine, it certainly does for my buddy. He has a 32 foot that gross weights about 11000.
__________________

__________________
2013 F250 Super Crew, 4x4, powerstrke
2013 Sundance 3310 CL, Platinum
iawoody2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2014, 11:08 PM   #17
Moderator Emeritus
 
SmokeyWren's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Midland County, Texas
Posts: 3,334
Additional info:

No, you cannot tow a big 5er with an F-250 without exceeding the GVWR of the F-250. At least not with an ordinary fifth wheel hitch mounted in the pickup. But there's more than one way to skin a cat. You can tow a huge 5er with an F-250 if you use a 5er tow dolly to haul the hitch weight, and use the F-250 receiver hitch only to pull the tow dolly and 5er.

For example, one 5er dolly is the Automated Safety Hitch.
The Automated Safety Hitch | Trailer Hitch | Gooseneck Horse Trailers | 5th Wheel RVs | Flatbed Goosenecks | Fifth Wheel

Then the GVWR of the F-250 is no longer the limiter. The GCWR becomes the limiter. And the GCWR for a newer F-250 PowerStroke is 23,500 pounds. So if you can limit the weight in the F-250 so the wet and loaded tow vehicle grosses less than 8,000 pounds, that leaves a max trailer weight of 15,000 pounds gross trailer weight. Subtract another 1,200 pounds or so for the weight of the Tow Buddy and that leaves a max 5er weight of 13,800 pounds.

13,800 is not a huge 5er, but it's certainly more than the 10,000 or so max 5er weight you could tow without the tow buddy.

To do that, you must replace the receiver with a Class 5 receiver rated for more than 13,800 pounds. And you must buy the expensive 5er tow dolly. But then you can tow a 5er that weighs up to about 13,800 pounds without exceeding any of Ford's weight ratings.
__________________
SmokeyWren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 12:21 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
caissiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,312
I would not get out the yard with a tow buddy.
Transports can do it because the front trailer is loaded as heavy or heavier.
Just stay within the tire load rating and the gross combined weight rating.
I am very comfortable at 23600lbs with my F250.
__________________
Barbara and Laurent, Hartland Big Country 3500RL. 39 ft long and 15500 GVW.
2005 Ford F250 SD, XL F250 4x4, Long Box, 6.0L Diesel, 6 Speed Stick, Hypertech Max Energy for Fuel mileage of 21 MPusG empty, 12.6 MPusG pulling the BC. ScangaugeII for display..
caissiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 07:44 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Rolfsted's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 273
Well I'm in a dilemma also. I bought a 32' 1994 Gulfstream Tour Master 5th wheel. I got such a deal on it I didn't consider weight of this camper. But in my defense there wasn't much I could do to find out. The tag on the side is faded and Gulfstream acts like they never made such a model. I can barely make out that gvwr for the camper is 14,500. Each axle looks to be 6,000.

I had my truck, a 2000 F250 7.3 crew cab 4X4 short bed, before I bought the camper. After reading many posts and downloading trailer life towing PDF I see my truck can tow 13,000 lb 5th wheel. But.....the trucks gvwr is 8,800 lbs. The truck loaded with passengers and dog weighs 7,800 lbs. That leaves only a 1,000 lb pin weight. I went to a digital scales on my return home this trip and with just the truck on the scales the weight was 10,200. That's 1,400 lbs over 8,800 gvwr. I freaked. I knew this camper was heavy by the way my truck squatted.

I went to my local trailer sales and the owner told me to go to a spring shop and add a leaf to the rear.

I'm in a fix....according to trailer life even an F350 can't pull a camper this heavy.

I have only pulled the camper four times. 3 were less than 300 miles 1 was 800 one way.

I'm thinking of adding a leaf, installing the best u-joints I can buy and the best brake pads available. I know it's still not enough, but it's that or make payments on a beafier truck or lighter camper.

I'm laying awake worrying about this.

Sorry for rambling on so.
__________________
Rolfsted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 08:38 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,174
Rereading the OP post and reflecting upon how we came about with our unit I would suggest that the first thing to do is to pick your accommodations. What you are doing is getting the horse before the cart. You will not be living in the truck.

Since you have time to do your homework I would go and look at trailers you would like to live in. Get the weights of the trailers you would consider and then figure out the truck required to pull them. If the trailer requires more truck than you are willing to purchase then revisit the trailers.

In following most posts about RV living it seems like the first unit was purchased to match the vehicle or budget and shortly thereafter a bigger or newer unit was being considered. Unfortunately in a lot of cases it also required an upgraded TV which made the upgrade punitive or impractical.

Sit down and figure out what are your possibilities, hobbies, interests and find the living quarters that meets most of your requirements. Perhaps you have a hobby that would be served well by having a toybox to store your quad or use as a workshop to build your RC aircraft. Perhaps you need more windows or a larger awning, who knows but you.

Big B hit it on the head when he suggested you look for what you can live in.

Good luck in getting a total package that you will be happy with and will suit you for a long time.
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 08:52 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
caissiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,312
No way your 2000 weight 7800lbs.
Its more like 6600lbs.
your F250 was the king of tow rigs then.
I have added a spring ply on mine and it does wonders for stability.
I used those lyer scales before and trough away the slip after I tried to get my money back.
I was plainly told that they are calibrated for 80k rigs and error on the plus side to protect truckers.
I do stop at DOT scales and always get the green light.
Once I was asked if I had air bags. I told them no and I was cleared.

Make sure your trailer brakes are set proper.
By error I towed with my brake controler set at low boost for small trailers and never noticed any brake performance problem in 3 years.
Found out that Every time the brake controler is disconnected from power it needs to by fully reprogrammed.
__________________
Barbara and Laurent, Hartland Big Country 3500RL. 39 ft long and 15500 GVW.
2005 Ford F250 SD, XL F250 4x4, Long Box, 6.0L Diesel, 6 Speed Stick, Hypertech Max Energy for Fuel mileage of 21 MPusG empty, 12.6 MPusG pulling the BC. ScangaugeII for display..
caissiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 09:00 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,232
Quote:
Originally Posted by caissiel View Post
No way your 2000 weight 7800lbs.
Its more like 6600lbs.
your F250 was the king of tow rigs then.
I have added a spring ply on mine and it does wonders for stability.
I used those lyer scales before and trough away the slip after I tried to get my money back.
I was plainly told that they are calibrated for 80k rigs and error on the plus side to protect truckers.
I do stop at DOT scales and always get the green light.
Once I was asked if I had air bags. I told them no and I was cleared.
It would help to know which scales were "liars" so we can all avoid them.
__________________
jesilvas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 09:12 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
caissiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jesilvas View Post

It would help to know which scales were "liars" so we can all avoid them.
Cat scales at FJ on 81 in PA.
Never wasted my money again.
I do use the dump scale, my 2005 loaded with 2 tanks of fuel with DW is 7800lbs. Again it may be off but I just pay for differential loads anyway.
__________________
Barbara and Laurent, Hartland Big Country 3500RL. 39 ft long and 15500 GVW.
2005 Ford F250 SD, XL F250 4x4, Long Box, 6.0L Diesel, 6 Speed Stick, Hypertech Max Energy for Fuel mileage of 21 MPusG empty, 12.6 MPusG pulling the BC. ScangaugeII for display..
caissiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 09:13 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 448
rollinthru. there are many rigs in your 30-34 ft range perfectly suitable for a properly equipped F250.
My F250 version has 6000 lb front axle, 6200 lb rear axle, but still only a 10,000 GVWR. That 10,000 GVWR was the limiting factor for me. There are some on here who believe as long as you're under the axle rating, you're good to go. I never found any Ford document that said you could ignore the GVWR limit.
I'm well under each axle rating and well under the combined tow rating, but right at the GVWR limit. my truck's actual weight with me in it and full of fuel is around 7800; plus my pin weight of 2200, puts me right at the 10,000. I pull a 35 ft toy hauler type 5th wheel, which weighs about 10,000 dry and about 13,500 loaded (I'm also solo and don't carry a lot of extra stuff). With the big empty garage area in the back, toy haulers weigh a bit less (dry) than the same size conventional 5th wheel. Also, when I load a few heavy ATV's in that back garage my pin weight actually goes down, just slightly.
I did upgrade my F250 shocks to HD premium shocks and I added rear air bags, not because they give any official change in the ratings, but because they help keep the rig level and the load evenly distributed. I also always change my 5'er pin boxes out for an air ride type pin box.
I have 2 other RV's so this isn't my primary or fulltime rig, its used to haul my ATV's back in the boonies for 2 weeks of ATV riding in the mountains. I live in the Rockies and my F250 has no problems pulling this rig up & down steep grades and Forest Service access roads.
My only advice is don't let the opinions here effect your decision. We all have our own personal opinions, preferences & priorities. Do your homework, learn how to read the vehicle ratings charts; the axle ratings and GVWR are not rocket science.

PS: I've got nothing against big trucks, this is what I pull my larger 5th wheel with
__________________
Jim2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 09:35 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,215
Biggest issue will be payload. Buying an F250 in the upper trim levels will greatly reduce the payload capability. I have seen newer 2013+ F250 King Ranch models with payload ratings as low as 1971lbs. Add in a 200lb driver, a 180lb 5th hitch and now you've only got 1591lbs for pin weight.
If I were buying new then spend the extra $800-900.0 and just get the F350.
As stated before it's best to pick out the 5'er 1st and match the truck to it.
__________________
Cumminsfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 11:38 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sharpsburg GA.
Posts: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
Ford states clearly in their documentation that adding air bags or extra springs does not change the GAWR (rear).

Of course not. But the upgrade tires do. RAWR is tire specific (read the label). If you upgrade the tires it has the effect of raising the RAWR, conversley, if you down grade the tires it lowers the RAWR. Neither action however changes the numbers on the label affixed to the truck door. The weight limiting factor to a point is the tires. If you add a thousand pounds of weight on the axle it probably won't bend and it surely won't collaspe. However it is almost certain that the tires will blow. Now there is, of course a limit to this, but as a practical matter upgrading the tires will increase the axle capacity. The air bags will do two things for you, they will level the truck so that the head lights are not looking up in the trees for racoons and they will stabilize the rear axle, and prevent yawing.

I've been towing lots of stuff since 1957 and no one has ever ask me what the RAWR was. Unless you are commerical and hauling something for compensation nobody cares what your RAWR is.
__________________
Stanley Z, Beautiful Sharpsburg Ga.
2014 Ford F350 DRW with a little bling
2005 DRV Mobile Suites 36TK3
stanleyz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 05:12 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Rolfsted's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 273
No way your 2000 weight 7800lbs.
Its more like 6600lbs.
your F250 was the king of tow rigs then.
I have added a spring ply on mine and it does wonders for stability.
I used those lyer scales before and trough away the slip after I tried to get my money back.
I was plainly told that they are calibrated for 80k rigs and error on the plus side to protect truckers.
I do stop at DOT scales and always get the green light.
Once I was asked if I had air bags. I told them no and I was cleared.

Make sure your trailer brakes are set proper.
By error I towed with my brake controler set at low boost for small trailers and never noticed any brake performance problem in 3 years.
Found out that Every time the brake controler is disconnected from power it needs to by fully reprogrammed.

Oh yes it does!! I've been on 3 scales now. With full tank me and my wife it weighs 7,800lbs. Front axle only weighs 4480.
__________________
Rolfsted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2014, 12:09 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,174
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanleyz View Post
Of course not. But the upgrade tires do. RAWR is tire specific (read the label). If you upgrade the tires it has the effect of raising the RAWR, conversley, if you down grade the tires it lowers the RAWR. Neither action however changes the numbers on the label affixed to the truck door. The weight limiting factor to a point is the tires. If you add a thousand pounds of weight on the axle it probably won't bend and it surely won't collaspe. However it is almost certain that the tires will blow. Now there is, of course a limit to this, but as a practical matter upgrading the tires will increase the axle capacity. The air bags will do two things for you, they will level the truck so that the head lights are not looking up in the trees for racoons and they will stabilize the rear axle, and prevent yawing.

I've been towing lots of stuff since 1957 and no one has ever ask me what the RAWR was. Unless you are commerical and hauling something for compensation nobody cares what your RAWR is.
2008 Ford Super Duty

https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas...0-450_08bb.pdf

Gross Axle Weight Rating is determined by the rated capacity of the minimum component of the axle system (axle, computer-selected springs, wheels, tires) of a specific vehicle. Front and rear GAWRs will, in all cases, sum to a number equal to or greater than the GVWR for the particular vehicle. Maximum loaded vehicle (including passengers, equipment and payload) cannot exceed the GVW rating or GAWR (front or rear).

Only if you got the upgraded axle and springs during the build.
__________________

__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
5th wheel, diesel



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Winnebago Destination 5th Wheel update mcumbie Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 17 11-02-2015 11:01 PM
Best 5th wheel toy hauler combination eggs1959 5th Wheel Discussion 13 03-10-2014 11:49 AM
From 5th wheel to Navion IQ ajlcal Class C Motorhome Discussions 4 02-18-2014 08:45 PM
Toyota Tundra. Would this pull a 36' or 38' 5th wheel? thebrat Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 46 06-23-2013 12:31 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.