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Old 04-13-2013, 02:01 PM   #1
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Can my truck handle these trailers?

I have a 2010 f150 4x4 Crewcab with a 5.4 and 3.55 gears.
Towing capacity = 9600 lbs

I am considering renting these 2 trailers:

2012 Trail Runner 25 OKS SLT
Length 28' 5"
Hitch Weight 595lbs
Dry Weight 5124 lbs
Gross Weight 6900 lbs
Cargo Weight 1776lbs

2010 Dutchmen Lite 28G-GS
Length 29' 9"
Hitch Weight 676 lbs
Dry Weight 5476 lbs
Gross Weight 7700 lbs
Cargo Capcity 2224 lbs

Can my truck handle each of these trailers?

Thanks
Jay
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Old 04-13-2013, 02:08 PM   #2
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you will be fine with either. tow in tow/haul mode. You will likely not see 6th gear and will notice downshifts up hills. but you will be fine.
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Old 04-13-2013, 04:01 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay845 View Post
Can my truck handle each of these trailers?
Depends on your definition of "handle".

Can the F-150 tow those trailers across normal highway hills and valleys without burning up something in the drivetrain of the F-150?

Probably.

Can the F-150 tow those two trailers without being overloaded over the GVWR of the F-150?

Probably not.

My 2012 F-150 is overloaded with a 20' TT that weighs 4,870 on the road. GVWR of my F-150 is 7,100 and my GVW is 7,200 with the TT hooked up and the WD hitch adjusted for highwaying. So that's overloaded with a hitch weight of ~650 pounds.

A good way to estimate the answer to your question requires you to weigh the wet and loaded tow vehicle without the trailer on a certified, automated, truck (CAT) scale.

Load the pickup with everything that will be in it when towing one of those trailers, including passenger(s), pet(s), tools, jacks, and the ball mount and shank of your WD hitch. Drive to a truckstop that has a CAT scale, fill up with gas, and weigh the wet and loaded pickup. Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded pickup from the GVWR of the pickup. The answer is the max hitch weight of any trailer you can tow without being overloaded.

Divide your max hitch weight by 0.15 and the answer is the max GVWR of any TT you can tow without being overloaded.
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Old 04-13-2013, 07:46 PM   #4
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How far are you going to tow and on what highways? If You are not going to tow very far or are going to stay on secondary roads you will be ok.

I towed a trailer with a dry weight of 4,400 and 5,200 wet with a 2011 F-150 5.0 litre. The truck knew the trailer was back there. The towing was relativly smooth but I felt no way would I want to max that truck out. The trailers you will be towing are larger so you will be close to the max comfort level for a 1/2 ton truck.

Towing trailers at 55 to 60 mph is a lot more comfortable than 65 to 70mph.

When You rent will they also give you a weight distribution hitch? They should as it will help smooth things out.
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Old 04-14-2013, 05:52 PM   #5
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So what do the specs for your truck tell you? You are legally responsible for having an adequate tow vehicle.
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Old 04-14-2013, 08:47 PM   #6
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So what do the specs for your truck tell you? You are legally responsible for having an adequate tow vehicle.
Yes I am aware of my responsibility for having an adequate tow vehicle. The reason I am asking the question is due to this requirement, and also to make sure I don't risk breaking anything on my truck.

With regards to what the specs on my truck tell me, I didn't really know what specs I should be considering (i.e. tow capacity alone, or others?). Some of the feedback I received in this thread has helped me, but I have yet to weight my truck etc.

Any other thoughts?
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Old 04-14-2013, 11:47 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Jay845 View Post
Yes I am aware of my responsibility for having an adequate tow vehicle. The reason I am asking the question is due to this requirement, and also to make sure I don't risk breaking anything on my truck.

With regards to what the specs on my truck tell me, I didn't really know what specs I should be considering (i.e. tow capacity alone, or others?). Some of the feedback I received in this thread has helped me, but I have yet to weight my truck etc.

Any other thoughts?
Another thought.
I was comparing your Duchman with our TT. Our TT is about 9K traveling weight, about 1300 more than the Duchman. When we got or TT we had a 3/4T deisel. It pulled and handled it well. After about 3 yrs we got the present 1T dually. The handling was so much better making a trip much more pleasant. Thinking back on it, I remember being pushed around by big trucks and MHs that doesn't happen now. There were times when I went into a corner a little fast I could feel the TT trying to push the 3/4T to the side. It just doesn't happen with the dually. Do you need a 1T Dually? No but IMO you will need a 3/4T min.
What to use when considering what you need, I would use GVWR of TV & TT, GAWR, tire cap, hitch rating, and GCWR.
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Old 04-15-2013, 09:29 PM   #8
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With regards to what the specs on my truck tell me, I didn't really know what specs I should be considering (i.e. tow capacity alone, or others?). Some of the feedback I received in this thread has helped me, but I have yet to weight my truck etc.

Any other thoughts?
What is your trucks GCWR/GVWR/FAWR/RAWR numbers ?? We know the truck can pull those two rental trailers but I wouldn't guess how much weight a truck can carry without those numbers.

As you mentioned having your trucks actual front and rear axle weights will give us a good idea of your trucks load carrying ability.

I will say unless your truck loaded extremely heavy both the trailers are doable.
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Old 04-16-2013, 07:04 PM   #9
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Wink Not enough truck/payload

To the OP: Your truck will be seriously overloaded with either of those trailers. The problem is payload, or rather the lack thereof. Take 13% of the TT's GVWR and that will be pretty close to real world tongue weight. You will be well over 1,000#of tongue weight which you have to subtract from payload. Very few half ton trucks can tow anywhere near their max tow capacity as they run out of payload long before they get there.

Unless your truck has the heavy duty payload package, which is very rare, you probably only have 1500# of payload or less to start with. Take 1,000 to 1,100# from your payload and subtract another 100 for the WDH and you simply aren't left with sufficient payload unless you bring no gear and or bodies.

Lets use my rig as an example:

I have an 06 F-150 5.4L, 3:55's, tow capacity 8,600#, GCWR 14,000# but my payload is only 1426#. The TT weighs 4600# loaded so I am 4,000#under tow capacity, truck and trailer loaded weigh 10,500# so I am 3,500# under GCWR..... BUT I am only 200# under the trucks GVWR due to the low payload and having a 200# Leer Shell. I could easily exceed this critical rating by just loading a little heavier than usual. Bottom line it is all about payload and a trip to the CAT scales will make all thngs known to you. Good Luck!
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Old 04-16-2013, 07:59 PM   #10
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To the OP: Your truck will be seriously overloaded with either of those trailers. The problem is payload, or rather the lack thereof. Take 13% of the TT's GVWR and that will be pretty close to real world tongue weight. You will be well over 1,000#of tongue weight which you have to subtract from payload. Very few half ton trucks can tow anywhere near their max tow capacity as they run out of payload long before they get there.

Unless your truck has the heavy duty payload package, which is very rare, you probably only have 1500# of payload or less to start with. Take 1,000 to 1,100# from your payload and subtract another 100 for the WDH and you simply aren't left with sufficient payload unless you bring no gear and or bodies.

Lets use my rig as an example:

I have an 06 F-150 5.4L, 3:55's, tow capacity 8,600#, GCWR 14,000# but my payload is only 1426#. The TT weighs 4600# loaded so I am 4,000#under tow capacity, truck and trailer loaded weigh 10,500# so I am 3,500# under GCWR..... BUT I am only 200# under the trucks GVWR due to the low payload and having a 200# Leer Shell. I could easily exceed this critical rating by just loading a little heavier than usual. Bottom line it is all about payload and a trip to the CAT scales will make all thngs known to you. Good Luck!
He listed the tongue weights of each trailer. both of them are under 700LBS.
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:28 PM   #11
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He listed the tongue weights of each trailer. both of them are under 700LBS.
Those weights are most likely dry weights. They aren't near enough for loaded weight. Proper hitch weight for those trailers should be in the 800/900lb range.
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:46 PM   #12
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He listed the tongue weights of each trailer. both of them are under 700LBS.
The only weight that is a bigger joke and more useless than a trailers "Dry" weight is its "Dry hitch weight". Both of those trailers will be well over 1,000# at 13%. Anything less than 13% tongue weight is a surefire recipe for sway.
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:35 PM   #13
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The truck manufacturer's GCWR value is the total pounds of truck, passengers, gear, trailer, and trailer load, that the truck's engine and drivetrain and suspension and frame are engineered to handle. Figure 150 lbs. per passenger or more like 225 lbs. per American adult when calculating passenger load. Add 1000 lbs. to the dry weight of the trailer to have a ballpark weight for it.

Add the numbers and compare them to the GCWR for the truck. I would not go beyond 80% of this number as in my own experience the manufacturers exaggerate the load handling capabilities of their trucks and SUV's.

Read the mrtrailer.com tests of 1-ton trucks pulling heavy trailer load as it will provide some valuable insights. If my trailer's brakes or brake activation is not working properly how long will it take to come to a stop or will I end up off the road or crashed into the cars ahead. How will the truck handle on a twisty mountain road or with strong crosswinds. Will I be having to worry about how much water and fluids are in the holding tanks before heading down the road.

The manufacturer's maximum is not the optimum maximum for frequent travel and travel across the country or in mountainous areas by any stretch of the imagination. It is only a starting point and a hard line not to cross and I would not want to even get close to my truck's maximums for anything.
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Old 04-27-2013, 09:32 AM   #14
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay845 View Post
Yes I am aware of my responsibility for having an adequate tow vehicle. The reason I am asking the question is due to this requirement, and also to make sure I don't risk breaking anything on my truck.

With regards to what the specs on my truck tell me, I didn't really know what specs I should be considering (i.e. tow capacity alone, or others?). Some of the feedback I received in this thread has helped me, but I have yet to weight my truck etc.

Any other thoughts?
Get the specs from your dealer or manufacturer. The specs will tell you how heavy a TT or fifth wheel trailer your truck is rated for. Payload capacity will tell you how heavy a pin weight plus all the "stuff" you can haul in the truck in addition to trailer weight. Get the facts don't rely on all of the personal opinions.

Example of specs:

2013 Ford F-150 | View Full Specification Library | Ford.com

2013 Ford Super Duty | View Full Specification Library | Ford.com

If these are not what you need then ask the dealer or manufacturer for the specs you need.
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