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Old 06-21-2016, 08:03 AM   #1
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Cargo/Payload capacity including a full tank of fuel

As most of us know, in addition to the towing capacity, the payload or cargo capacity is just as important. I've seen several people indicate that you need to subtract the weight of a full tank of gas from your payload/cargo capacity but that seems contrary (at least in Ford's case) to what they indicate.

For example, in the manual it says to subtract "Hitch hardware weight, such as a draw bar, ball, locks or weight distributing, Driver weight, Passenger(s) weight, Payload, cargo and luggage weight Aftermarket equipment weight"

It does not specifically mention to subtract the weight of a full tank of gas which goes along with what it says in Ford's Truck Payload documents such as this one:

https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas...load_SB_v5.pdf

It states the base curb weight is "The weight of the vehicle including standard equipment, oil, lubricants and a full tank of fuel. It does not include the weight of driver, passengers, cargo or any optional or aftermarket equipment."

If the weight of a full tank of gas is already factored in, why would one need to subtract it again from the payload/cargo capacity? Isn't that double dipping?

I can't speak for GM or Dodge but that appears to be the case for Ford.
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Old 06-21-2016, 09:28 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by MapleKing View Post

If the weight of a full tank of gas is already factored in, why would one need to subtract it again from the payload/cargo capacity? Isn't that double dipping?

I can't speak for GM or Dodge but that appears to be the case for Ford.
Then you wouldn't. But according to your post Ford doesn't factor in a driver and others do factor in a 150lb driver. Different ways of doing it.
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Old 06-21-2016, 09:28 AM   #3
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You're right. All of Ford's calculated weight ratings (payload capacity and tow rating) include a full tank of fuel.

But you still shouldn't use them because you'll likely underestimate the weight of your tow vehicle (TV). Instead, use engineered weight ratings of GVWR and GCWR, then subtract the actual scaled weight of the TV to get actual payload capacity and tow rating.

Actual payload capacity available for hitch weight = GVWR minus the weight of your wet and loaded TV. Actual tow rating = GCWR minus the weight of your wet and loaded TV. "Wet" means full of all fluids and lubricants, including fuel, coolant, ATF, axle lube, etc. "Loaded" means with all the people, pets, tools, options, hitch, and anything that will be in the TV when towing.

But even your actual tow rating is not final unless you also don't exceed the actual payload capacity. IOW, do not exceed either the GCWR or the GVWR if you don't want to be overloaded. Usually your actual payload capacity available for hitch weight is the limiter as to how heavy a trailer you can tow without being overloaded.
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Old 06-21-2016, 10:47 AM   #4
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Just go weigh the truck and eliminate any guessing.
If you're that close on weights that a full tank of gas makes a difference then you need a bigger truck or smaller trailer.
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Old 06-21-2016, 01:06 PM   #5
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Just go weigh the truck and eliminate any guessing.
If you're that close on weights that a full tank of gas makes a difference then you need a bigger truck or smaller trailer.
I never mentioned me or my vehicle. I just keep seeing references from several posters that will insist that you have to subtract the full tank of gas from cargo/payload capacity on Ford's and that's not accurate. They also mention everything and everything else and like you said, if you're that close, you need a different vehicle.
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Old 06-21-2016, 02:07 PM   #6
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You would natually add the weight of additional fuel of you have an aux tank. But sounds like Ford figures the weight of fuel in the standard tank.
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Old 06-21-2016, 02:40 PM   #7
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