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Old 01-18-2013, 08:30 AM   #15
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But why get the right truck for the job when the dealer tells you that you will be fine towing that trailer. We have been the route of a small truck and a trailer that were within the truck manufacturers tow ratings....but that was with an empty base model truck. Once you got the truck loaded for a trip, you were well over the ratings of GVWR and GCWR.

Granted the GCWR is not stamped on a door sticker, but it is in the owners manual. I know it is against many peoples basic morals to open and read any manuals.

Towing with a properly selected truck and trailer within the manufacturers rating is so much better than struggling with a truck that is beyond the manufacturers ratings. RVing is supposed to be fun.

Ken
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Old 01-18-2013, 12:54 PM   #16
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TXiceman said:
Towing with a properly selected truck and trailer within the manufacturers rating is so much better than struggling with a truck that is beyond the manufacturers ratings. RVing is supposed to be fun.

Well said. I couldn't agree more! I used to tow over my GCWR and it was no fun.
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Old 01-18-2013, 08:30 PM   #17
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My point regarding the Ford Ranger is that upgrading the wheels/tires or even the rear axle has done nothing insofar as the truck's frame, drivetrain, cooling capacity, etc. to increase their capabilities. Therefore, the statement by some that the LEO is merely going to look at the tire ratings and determine weight capability from the sum of those misses the point that the truck's actual load carrying (or, for that matter, towing) capabilities are a function of far more than just its tire ratings.
Were talking about FAWR/RAWR which are on the trucks certification placard. By fed law the tires on the truck shall meet the truck mfg GAWR.
A leo will look at the tire capacities. He also looks to see that the tires meets the trucks certified axle capacities (FAWR/RAWR). If the tires exceeds the axle capacities he can use the lesser of the two. Using higher rated wheels and tires on a Ranger nets the operator nothing.

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My point is, and remains, that the ability to register a truck with the state/province for a particular GVW or GCW has nothing whatsoever to do with the manufacturer's ratings or actual capabilities of that particular truck
Broad statement. You could be wrong on that point also. However much depends on how the states law reads. If it reads as my reply above its within the mfg recommendations.

\************************************************* **********

The OP asks ; " How can you have a safety margin of 680 lbs on truck front axle and 800 on rear axle and be over max on gross vehicle weight by 420 pounds. I assume there is a simple explanation but I can't figure it out. Thanks."
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Old 01-18-2013, 09:03 PM   #18
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The 19.5" tires and wheels on the Ford Ranger example addressed the following:

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Originally Posted by elkhornsun View Post
Tires and rims can be changed and in so doing either increase the safe payload capacity or seriously decrease it. So the factory weight ratings provide a safe zone for operation with a new and unmodified truck only.
The factory weight ratings as shown on the driver's door sticker cannot be changed, either by upgrading tires and/or wheels or by registering the truck for ratings higher than those shown on the driver's door sticker. That was, and remains, my point.


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Old 01-18-2013, 09:06 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by TXiceman View Post
But why get the right truck for the job when the dealer tells you that you will be fine towing that trailer. We have been the route of a small truck and a trailer that were within the truck manufacturers tow ratings....but that was with an empty base model truck. Once you got the truck loaded for a trip, you were well over the ratings of GVWR and GCWR.

Granted the GCWR is not stamped on a door sticker, but it is in the owners manual. I know it is against many peoples basic morals to open and read any manuals.

Towing with a properly selected truck and trailer within the manufacturers rating is so much better than struggling with a truck that is beyond the manufacturers ratings. RVing is supposed to be fun.

Ken
The topic isn't about which is the correct truck. And yes its best to buy a truck that has enough GAWRs/tire capacity to carry the load. And enough power to pull its rated tow capacity.

All GCWRs are in the owners manual. I have three LDT trucks and the owner manuals has pages of different GCWRs. One for every truck configuration.
A certain one ton DRW may have a 21000 GCWR with a 3.73 axle. I can swap to a 4.10 axle and the GCWR jumps to 23000 GCWR. Or I can add a different tranny and gain the 2000 lb more GCWR.
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