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Old 08-13-2012, 08:21 PM   #43
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We are going camping this week when I pick her up. We are only going about an hour away and I see there is a CAT scale on the way. I will stop and check it out. With a dry weight of 6k I am thinking that loaded it cant weight more than 7.5k? 1500# seems like a lot of stuff loaded for a small family of 4. What is the average weight people usually add to the dry weight?
Your numbers may be good but Dry weight quite often is not a good number. The TT may have had things added since such as Awning, AC etc.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:15 PM   #44
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What is the average weight people usually add to the dry weight?
The first trip, not much. But Darling Wife will be making notes of the things she needs in the camper to make camping bearable for the lady of the house. By the middle of the third camping trip, most folks with RV trailers have them loaded nearly to the GVWR. And after the man of the house has a flat on the trailer during a rainstorm and has to change a trailer tire in a wet muddy bar ditch, he will never again be caught without a floor jack and a big piece of plywood to use as the jack base.

And you'll learn as you go what you'll need that you didn't think about before. Plenty of planks to use for leveling blocks for the trailer. A 4' carpenter's level to check the level of the floor of the trailer so the reefer will work good. A 30' 35-amp extension cord in case you stop at Aunt Mary's house and need to keep the reefer running while you're there. And adapters to go from a 35 amp plug to a 15 amp plug, and vice versa . Wheel chocks. A much-longer drinking water hose than that shorty the trailer manufacturer "gave" you. And no, an ordinary garden hose won't work - makes the water taste like ...well... you know. A toolbox full of tools. Extra fuses and light bulbs that will fit inside and outside your trailer

One suggestion to prevent learning a few new chioce words. Before you go, replace a trailer tire with the spare tire. Then be certain that everything you used to change that tire gets packed into the trailer. Jack(s), jack base, lug wrench, whatever wrench was required to get the spare tire off the trailer and mount it on the ground, then put the trailer tire back where the spare had been.

Next, put the spare tire for the truck on the left rear of the truck, and the tire from the left rear into the spare tire carrier. Then be sure everything you used to do that chore gets packed back into its rightful place in the truck.

I had to go to town today to replace my piece of 3/4" x 15" pipe used to chain up the WD bars. I left the old one lying on the hitch and apparently it fell off somewhere back down the road. And lucky I had a spare in the trailer. Else I couldn't hook up/unhook the WD bars on the trailer.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:33 PM   #45
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Much depends on how you plan to use your trailer.

If you travel a couple of hundred miles or less and the terrain is not mountainous, slightly over weight will not have detrimental effects.

If you plan long trips through challenging terrain, you want to stay within guidelines to decrease the stress on the tow vehicle.

Don't let the weight police get you down. Not everyone needs a diesel dually to tow a pop-up.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:52 PM   #46
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Your numbers may be good but Dry weight quite often is not a good number. The TT may have had things added since such as Awning, AC etc.
I hear ya. I know in the future I wont go by dry weight alone. I looked up the AC weight and it about 100 lbs. Lighter than I thought. Not sure about the awning. I know that the 2 propane tanks and batteries are going to be around 200#
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:55 PM   #47
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The first trip, not much. But Darling Wife will be making notes of the things she needs in the camper to make camping bearable for the lady of the house. By the middle of the third camping trip, most folks with RV trailers have them loaded nearly to the GVWR. And after the man of the house has a flat on the trailer during a rainstorm and has to change a trailer tire in a wet muddy bar ditch, he will never again be caught without a floor jack and a big piece of plywood to use as the jack base.

And you'll learn as you go what you'll need that you didn't think about before. Plenty of planks to use for leveling blocks for the trailer. A 4' carpenter's level to check the level of the floor of the trailer so the reefer will work good. A 30' 35-amp extension cord in case you stop at Aunt Mary's house and need to keep the reefer running while you're there. And adapters to go from a 35 amp plug to a 15 amp plug, and vice versa . Wheel chocks. A much-longer drinking water hose than that shorty the trailer manufacturer "gave" you. And no, an ordinary garden hose won't work - makes the water taste like ...well... you know. A toolbox full of tools. Extra fuses and light bulbs that will fit inside and outside your trailer

One suggestion to prevent learning a few new chioce words. Before you go, replace a trailer tire with the spare tire. Then be certain that everything you used to change that tire gets packed into the trailer. Jack(s), jack base, lug wrench, whatever wrench was required to get the spare tire off the trailer and mount it on the ground, then put the trailer tire back where the spare had been.

Next, put the spare tire for the truck on the left rear of the truck, and the tire from the left rear into the spare tire carrier. Then be sure everything you used to do that chore gets packed back into its rightful place in the truck.

I had to go to town today to replace my piece of 3/4" x 15" pipe used to chain up the WD bars. I left the old one lying on the hitch and apparently it fell off somewhere back down the road. And lucky I had a spare in the trailer. Else I couldn't hook up/unhook the WD bars on the trailer.
Thank you. I see you have a lot of knowledge and experience with towing. I hope to learn a lot from you here
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:57 PM   #48
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Much depends on how you plan to use your trailer.

If you travel a couple of hundred miles or less and the terrain is not mountainous, slightly over weight will not have detrimental effects.

If you plan long trips through challenging terrain, you want to stay within guidelines to decrease the stress on the tow vehicle.

Don't let the weight police get you down. Not everyone needs a diesel dually to tow a pop-up.
Yeah for now most rips will be close by. With a 6 year old and 4 year old, we dont want to spend too much time in the truck. Some times the terrain might be including some hill but mostly flat I would say 90% would be flat lands, but long those routes may include lots of wind and semis on 2 lane roads. That what has be concerned as well.
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Old 08-13-2012, 10:27 PM   #49
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...long those routes may include lots of wind and semis on 2 lane roads. That what has be concerned as well.
Then invest in a Hensley or ProPride hitch. You will not experience sway.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:09 PM   #50
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Then invest in a Hensley or ProPride hitch. You will not experience sway.
The dealer gave me an E2 hitch with sway bars. Will see how that works out.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:31 AM   #51
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The dealer gave me an E2 hitch with sway bars. Will see how that works out.
If properly installed, adjusted and hooked up, it will probably work fine 99.9% of the time. It's that other tiny slice of time that is the reason lots of folks pay extra for a ProPride hitch.

Your hitch, and all the other WD brands that cost less than $1,000, will "help control sway", but not prevent it. If you ever have a trailer get into an uncontrollable sway, then you'll be glad to pay the big bucks for a ProPride hitch so it will never happen again.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:44 PM   #52
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I am in a similar situation. I purchased a TT with a dry weight of 5930# and a gvwr of 8100#. Specs say 725 hitch weight. I assume thats dry so I guess about 925 with batts and propane? I have a f150 5.0 4x4 screw with 3.73 gears. Mt gcwr is 15100# and payload is 1700#. The manual says 9300# trailer weight, so I was basing my TT choice off of that. Now if I have a dry weight of 6000 I assume I would have a loaded weight of 7500? I dont plan on taking any water as I would camp at full service sites. I have 2 young kids and a skinny wife so we are at about 500 with the 4 of us and the dog. So I am thinking that leaves me with about a payload of 1425#? If I do the math right that leaves me with 275# of cargo in the truck. To me it looks like I am right at the limit? Looking for other opinions on if I figured this out correctly. Thanks. Oh and looking forward to the rv life
I am not expert as I started this thread. I will say I learned a lot and the hard way. Asked my question after the fact. Best advice was to camp close to home the first time. This was to list and retrieve all the things I forgot. For the record it was quite a lot.
The second thing was take everything to the CAT scales to weigh. You will be surprised how much weight you will actually add. Everything matter.
Next thing I learned, again the hard way was how to hook up the WDH on my Autoride with Auto Leveling. This site is great when it comes to learning.
Read a lot of advice, ask a lot of questions then determine what works for you.
Have fun
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:56 PM   #53
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And after the man of the house has a flat on the trailer during a rainstorm and has to change a trailer tire in a wet muddy bar ditch, he will never again be caught without a floor jack and a big piece of plywood to use as the jack base.
As a retired transportation engineer for the WA DOT I have to ask what is a "bar ditch"?
Never heard that term in my 30 years there.
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Old 08-14-2012, 11:27 PM   #54
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As a retired transportation engineer for the WA DOT I have to ask what is a "bar ditch"?
Never heard that term in my 30 years there.
I think he was refering to a "borrow ditch". My Dad worked for the Id. state highway dept when I was a kid. I heard him talk about them. I think it was a place that they dug the ditch wider to get more fill for the road.
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Old 08-15-2012, 04:49 AM   #55
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Bar ditch is a Texas term for the drainage ditches that run alongside a roadway. Wikipedia defines it as:

A bar ditch, also known as a barrow pit, is a roadside pit or channel dug for drainage purposes.[1] The term is most often used in the Southwestern United States.

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Old 08-15-2012, 10:18 AM   #56
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Bar ditch is a Texas term for the drainage ditches that run alongside a roadway. Wikipedia defines it as:

A bar ditch, also known as a barrow pit, is a roadside pit or channel dug for drainage purposes.[1] The term is most often used in the Southwestern United States.

Rusty

Good info Rusty. What I remembered was Borrow Pit, not ditch like I said before. My understanding was when they built roads with horses they "borrowed dirt/rock for fill where ever they could get it with the least effort, hence Borrow Pit. They would dig a wide spot in the ditch (maybe 15/20' wide & long. I suspect that the name evolved due to misunder standing and/or easier to say.
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