Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-18-2014, 10:33 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
dcarver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 416
Well I've made the decision to just rig out the tahoe. Seeing what others with diesels average for fuel mileage and doing some calculations based on my avg MPG now and how many miles we tow I'm saving $500/yr to stay with it rather than move to a diesel, plus the extra cost of paying for a diesel optioned truck w/under 150K miles. If I drove more than 12k/yr and towed more than 3-4k then yes I believe a diesel would be the way to go or if it wasn't $.75/gallon more.
If the tahoe fails as a good tow vehicle too then I'm going to find a 2500 suburban which in gas will be about $200/yr more than the diesel but the $5000 premium on the used diesel would take 16 years to recoup and I ain't waiting that long lol
Thanks for all the input
__________________

__________________
dcarver is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-18-2014, 10:59 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
caissiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,312
A wise man told me one time that the car/truck you own is always the cheaper to operate. So trading to save really never pays off.
And an other one said if a thousand dollars a year invested on a vehicle for repairs will allow it to run almost forever.
__________________

__________________
Barbara and Laurent, Hartland Big Country 3500RL. 39 ft long and 15500 GVW.
2005 Ford F250 SD, XL F250 4x4, Long Box, 6.0L Diesel, 6 Speed Stick, Hypertech Max Energy for Fuel mileage of 21 MPusG empty, 12.6 MPusG pulling the BC. ScangaugeII for display..
caissiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2014, 11:26 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 596
Here's one for the gasser! Last summer towed my Nash 23b (28 feet, 5800lbs loaded) from Vancouver Island to Winnipeg. Averaged 10.8 us mpg. Cruise set to 64mph most of the way. Most hills in 4th gear (Roger's pass in 3rd).

Towing with 2012 Ford 5.0L 3.73 rear.
__________________
marcham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2014, 01:18 AM   #32
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollondown View Post
The weight is a factor in mileage, but the aerodynamics of the trailer plays a more important role. I can load 15k pounds of steel plate on a flatbed trailer and still get 15-16 mpg. But I can hook up to a 7000lb 5th wheel and my mileage drops to 10-11. The frontal square footage that has to move thru the air, and the shape of the back of the camper make a huge difference in mileage. Take 2 sheets of plywood put them together to make an 8x8 wall, push it 60mph. That in effect is what your doing.
You are right about the frontal surface area. I found out after using 3 very different campers with the same truck that there isn't much difference in MPG's between a 2500 pound slide in and a 8000 pound, 29 foot 5th wheel.

A friend of mine at work has a 2001 Dodge extended cab diesel that he bought new. He took a trip to Alaska a couple years ago and had a slide in, pop up camper in the back to sleep in on the trip. He had a small generator on a front mounted hitch hauler also and I asked him what he averaged for fuel mileage because he was traveling light and low profile and I almost didn't believe him when he told me he got "about 15 MPG". I thought surely he would have been closer to 18.
__________________
rlwithrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2014, 05:40 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 327
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollondown View Post
The weight is a factor in mileage, but the aerodynamics of the trailer plays a more important role. I can load 15k pounds of steel plate on a flatbed trailer and still get 15-16 mpg. But I can hook up to a 7000lb 5th wheel and my mileage drops to 10-11. The frontal square footage that has to move thru the air, and the shape of the back of the camper make a huge difference in mileage. Take 2 sheets of plywood put them together to make an 8x8 wall, push it 60mph. That in effect is what your doing.
As you can see from my previous post, I experienced almost exactly the same thing. I said on other towing threads that 10-11 is about par with a diesel. I often wonder if a camper shell would make the whole rig more aerodynamic.
__________________
fvstringpicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2014, 08:51 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
bjlakatos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 886
9-11 mpg (70ish mph, various elevations/inclines) w/the TT

14mpg w/the boat

20-21mpg empty


21' Tahoe Q7i boat, 4100# on scale
35' TT 7700# empty 9500# GVWR
2006 Ram 3500 dually, 5.9L Cummins
__________________
Brian
2016 RAM 3500 6.7L DRW
2018 Chaparral 360IBL, Andersen Ultimate II hitch
bjlakatos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2014, 06:37 PM   #35
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 65
Agreed that frontal area makes a bigger difference to MPG than weight, although weight obviously matters. Another set of data to consider:

2013 F250 diesel at 65 mph
- 17-18 mpg unloaded
- 13 mpg pulling an empty 24' enclosed car trailer (4,500 pounds)
- 12 mpg pulling the same trailer loaded to 8,000 pounds.

As you can see, nearly doubling the weight of the trailer only dropped it by 1 mpg.

For comparison, an F150 Ecoboost at 65 mph will get around 21 MPG unloaded and around 9 mpg towing this same trailer. This was my prior truck. 9 mpg on a 26 gallon fuel tank means a very short range and frequent stops to refuel, which was *really* annoying especially when you can't pull into just any gas station due to the truck/trailer size.
__________________

__________________
drewtk is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
diesel, towing



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Towing a Ford F250 Super Duty Scottybdivin Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 37 12-27-2013 07:54 AM
Diesel Break in before MPG improve bobfa Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 21 11-18-2013 09:50 PM
Gas Versus Diesel ladyrvr66 iRV2.com General Discussion 11 10-26-2013 08:30 PM
Class C Diesel Motorhomes, New 35SK Super C RV Unveiled by Thor Motor Coach DriVer RV Industry Press 1 09-05-2013 01:20 PM
Ram 4x4 Diesel Towing Capabilities? Vetl82 Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 44 07-05-2013 08:44 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.