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Old 07-28-2012, 11:34 AM   #1
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DRW air pressure?

Just upgraded to a 2011 Chevy Duramax DRW not sure about rear tire air pressure. My pin weight is at 3k and have aux fuel tank that I will haul 30 to 50 gallons. I used 80 psi in the rear of my old SRW but I don't think I need to run max pressure anymore. What pressure should I start with? I have 70 psi in them now.Thanks for input.
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:00 PM   #2
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Once you get to the scales hitched up and ready for the road, you'll have actual axle weights to work with. At that point, you can use your tire manufacturer's load/inflation charts to set the tire pressure.

Until then, IF you're certain that you're not over your GAWRs, you can start with the front and rear tire pressures shown on the sticker in your driver's door jamb. Those are the tire pressures required for the gross axle weight ratings shown. In my case, although the load range E tires are rated for maximum allowable tire load at 80 PSIG, the GAWRs only require 65 PSIG front and 60 PSIG rear. Yours may, of course, be different than mine with a different make truck.

Too much pressure will only result in premature tire wear in the center of the tread and a ride that will beat you up needlessly.

Rusty
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:10 PM   #3
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I have an 06 GMC one ton dually and have a pin weight of 2500 and run 65 lbs in the front and 60 lbs in the duallys. Thats what is on the door sticker so that has been what I have run for the past 6 years and so far no problems and I'm still on the factory stock tires.
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:32 PM   #4
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Thanks, I will go with the psi on the door sticker for now.
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Old 07-29-2012, 02:26 PM   #5
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A lot of new dually pickups come with size LT245/75R17E tires. Here is the load/inflation table for those tires.

PSI . single . dual
35 . 1770 . . 1610
40 . 1945 . . 1770
45 . 2110 . . 1920
50 . 2270 . . 2040
55 . 2430 . . 2210
60 . 2595 . . 2360
65 . 2755 . . 2535
70 . 2900 . . 2640
75 . 3050 . . 2775
80 . 3195 . . 2910

What does that mean?

”Single” means single tires on an axle, i.e., your front axle. “Dual” means dual tires on an axle, i.e., your rear axle. The weights are the max weights for each tire.

Weigh the truck on a CAT scale and divide the weight on the front axle by two to get the weight on each front tire, then use the next higher weight in the “single” column to see the minimum PSI you need for that weight. So if you have 4,500 pounds on your front axle, or 2,250 pounds on each front tire, then you need 50 PSI in the front tires.

Divide the weight on the rear axle by four to get the weight on each rear tire. For example, if your rear axle weighs 6,500 pounds, that’s 1625 pounds on each rear tire. So you need 40 PSI in each rear tire.

Loaded to the gills, you have 5,000 on the front axle and 8000 on the rear axle. So 60 PSI in the front and 50 PSI in the rear tires.

Overloaded with 9,000 pounds on the rear axle? 60 PSI is all you need as far as the tires are concerned.

If your dualy has those tires and you run 65 in the front, that's enough for up to 5,510 pounds on the front axle. If you run 60 PSI in the rear tires, that's enough for up to 9,440 pounds on the rear axle. I hope you don't abuse your poor truck by hauling 9,440 pounds on the rear axle.
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Old 07-29-2012, 03:00 PM   #6
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What Rusty and Smokey said.

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Old 07-29-2012, 07:58 PM   #7
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Check out Step 5, just the info you're looking for.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:47 AM   #8
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Thanks for the tire load information. With only 1k on each rear tire what is the minimum pressure you would suggest when running empty in my dually?
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:08 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugersdad View Post
Thanks for the tire load information. With only 1k on each rear tire what is the minimum pressure you would suggest when running empty in my dually?
So far, my personal test for my Ram dully has been correct for the recommend tire inflation pressure by using Step 5 mentioned above. For me, my unloaded rear inflation pressure is 45 for now. I may need to go lower because the last check showed a little center wear. I monitor the tread wear with a depth gauge. There is info about that here.
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Old 08-06-2012, 11:57 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren
A lot of new dually pickups come with size LT245/75R17E tires. Here is the load/inflation table for those tires.

PSI . single . dual
35 . 1770 . . 1610
40 . 1945 . . 1770
45 . 2110 . . 1920
50 . 2270 . . 2040
55 . 2430 . . 2210
60 . 2595 . . 2360
65 . 2755 . . 2535
70 . 2900 . . 2640
75 . 3050 . . 2775
80 . 3195 . . 2910

What does that mean?

”Single” means single tires on an axle, i.e., your front axle. “Dual” means dual tires on an axle, i.e., your rear axle. The weights are the max weights for each tire.

Weigh the truck on a CAT scale and divide the weight on the front axle by two to get the weight on each front tire, then use the next higher weight in the “single” column to see the minimum PSI you need for that weight. So if you have 4,500 pounds on your front axle, or 2,250 pounds on each front tire, then you need 50 PSI in the front tires.

Divide the weight on the rear axle by four to get the weight on each rear tire. For example, if your rear axle weighs 6,500 pounds, that’s 1625 pounds on each rear tire. So you need 40 PSI in each rear tire.

Loaded to the gills, you have 5,000 on the front axle and 8000 on the rear axle. So 60 PSI in the front and 50 PSI in the rear tires.

Overloaded with 9,000 pounds on the rear axle? 60 PSI is all you need as far as the tires are concerned.

If your dualy has those tires and you run 65 in the front, that's enough for up to 5,510 pounds on the front axle. If you run 60 PSI in the rear tires, that's enough for up to 9,440 pounds on the rear axle. I hope you don't abuse your poor truck by hauling 9,440 pounds on the rear axle.
Smoke do they have inflation tables for major tire manufactures or by vehicle manufactures?
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:12 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by 10Boomer View Post
Smoke do they have inflation tables for major tire manufactures or by vehicle manufactures?
The load/inflation tables are developed by the engineers at the Tire and Rim Assn, (TRA). All the tire and vehicle manufacturers that sell in NHorth America belong to the TRA. Some tire manufacturers publish the TRA load/inflation tables under their own name, but they omit any tire sizes they do not sell. Thus the Goodyear tables do not include the big and tall sizes sold by BFGoodrich. And some such as Michelin don't publish any load/inflation tables for tires sizes suitable for light trucks - they do publish the ones for trucks and busses and big RVs.

Toyo has a good one last time I looked, but my Adobe Reader is on the blink and will not show it to me. Maybe you can see it with yours:
Load & Inflation Tables | Toyo Tires
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