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Old 06-15-2014, 07:07 PM   #1
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F150 + Jayco 29BHS

I have a 2010 F-150 5.4L 4x4 SuperCrew with a 3.55 limited slip and factory tow package.
I have never owned or pulled a TT. Looking at getting a Jayco 29BHS. Is this feasible? Anything I need to do to my truck to accomplish this?
We will be traveling with 4 people in the truck. I would also like to go to Colorado and Wyoming with this setup if possible. Don't know if this would even work in the mountains.
Any help to a newbie would be appreciated. Just looking for some guidance.
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Old 06-15-2014, 07:42 PM   #2
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Mapasha, you will want to find some facts on your truck and the 29bhs. A quick search says the trailer weighs about 5,500 unloaded and a maximum weight limit of 7,500. So, let's assume it is 6,500 if you pack it conservatively and don't drive around with water in your fresh tank (fill it when you get there). It appears the 2010 has a towing capacity over 9,000 lbs depending on options so you should be good there. The general rule of thumb is the tongue weight will be 10-15% so 650-1000. That's where it gets tricky. Your truck can probably only take about 1100 or 1200 in "cargo". That means with a full tank of gas and a 150lb driver, you can only load that much weight (see the sticker inside the driver door). So, whatever you weigh over 150 plus the wife and both kids and about 800lbs of the hitch and trailer. It's going to be close, if not slightly over. You can probably out everything in the trailer and nothing in the truck and be close. The other challenge may be your transmission. I had a 2007 with that same engine, but only a 4 speed. When towing, I never saw the high gear which meant high revs. And the first hill had me shifting down to pull. It was not much fun. I've since upgraded to the 2013 Ecoboost. It had about the same towing specs as your 2010, but a 6 speed and more torque at a lower rpm. My trailer is heavier than yours at 7,050 empty and a max of 9,500. I don't load it that full, and I keep the truck bed empty. We are right at the limit.

My "recommendation" if you are traveling through mountains would be to invest in either the Ecoboost with max trailering package, or step up to a 250 or 2500 series truck. Just a little more truck will make a lot of difference in being comfortable in a long trip. Your truck can do it, but you will be spending a lot more time focused on driving (every passing truck, are you between the lines, etc) where a bigger truck makes it a more casual ride. Good luck! You will get lots of opinions here, so wanted to share mine since I've been where you are.
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:28 PM   #3
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Thanks Dan!

Those are the numbers I had come up with too. Pretty close anyway.
Didn't seem like I had much weight to spare, if any.

By the way I do have a 6 speed transmission and it seems if I go E85 the 5.4L is rated at 390lbs of torque. Of course I can't count on finding E85 everywhere like I can in Iowa.

I had Ben thought of going with a Class A diesel but just found out today that I cannot flat tow my F150. Darn it Ford!!!!! That wasn't possible until the 2012 model year. :-(

The search continues.....
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Old 06-16-2014, 10:14 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mapasha View Post
I have a 2010 F-150 5.4L 4x4 SuperCrew with a 3.55 limited slip and factory tow package.
Your tow rating is over 9,000 pounds, so no problem with having enough power and torque to drag that trailer over the mountain pass.

Quote:
Looking at getting a Jayco 29BHS. Is this feasible? We will be traveling with 4 people in the truck.
The tow rating is based on the GCWR of your truck, and it indicates how much weight you can pull. But that's not your limiter on an F-150. Your limiter is the payload capacity for hitch and cargo weight (including passengers) in the cab. The payload capacity is based on your truck's GVWR. In other words, how much weight you can haul on the truck's suspension and axles without overloading anything. You will exceed the GVWR of the truck long before you get close to your F-150's GCWR of 15,500 pounds.

If your truck has the regular tow pkg, then your GVWR is probably 7,200 pounds. With your family in the truck and normal stuff in the trailer, and with the weight in the trailer distributed so you have the normal 12% to 15% tongue weight, you'll be overloaded over the GVWR of the pickup.

A 2011 Jay Flight G2 29BHS has GVWR of 7700 pounds. A 2014 Jay Flight 290BH has GVWR of 9,250. So depending on exactly which Jayco 29BHS you are considering, the trailer will gross over 7,000 pounds when wet and loaded on the road.

7,000 pounds trailer weight is about 875 pounds tongue weight. That much tongue weight will overload your F-150 over the GVWR of the F-150.

Quote:
Anything I need to do to my truck to accomplish this?
You can mask the overloaded condition by installing Firestone RideRite air bags in your rear suspension. That won't increase your payload or GVWR, but it will raise your rear end up a bit so your headlights won't blind oncoming traffic, and your rear end won't obviously be overloaded by squatting too far down.

Quote:
I would also like to go to Colorado and Wyoming with this setup if possible. Don't know if this would even work in the mountains.
Pulling power is not your problem. The GCWR (and resulting tow rating) is a good indication of how much weight you can pull up the mountain pass without overheating anything in the drivetrain and without being the slowpoke holding up traffic. So any TT that weighs less than about 9,000 pounds should be no big problem in the mountains. PROVIDED you understand that the brakes on your truck will be overloaded, so you must have excellent trailer brakes, as well as downshift to come down the mountain pass without overheating your brakes.

Your problem is payload capacity for hitch weight. Your truck will be overloaded over the GVWR of the F-150. That could result in broken springs or blown out tires or not having enough braking power to stop your overloaded pickup in emergency conditions. But you won't be the only one dragging a TT with an overloaded F-150. If you continue reading other threads in this forum, you'll find lots of experienced RVers that don't worry about exceeding the GVWR of their tow vehicle.
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Old 06-16-2014, 11:08 AM   #5
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The Jayco is a 2006.
I have seen many a canted F150 or Silverado but I don't like doing things that way.
May have to start looking at the Lite or Ultra Lite trailers.

Thank you for all the VERY good information.
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Old 06-16-2014, 01:33 PM   #6
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I had Ben thought of going with a Class A diesel but just found out today that I cannot flat tow my F150.
Don't give up on the motorhome idea. Instead of flat towing the F-150, consider towing it on an equipment trailer with GVWR of around 8,000 pounds or more. Ordinary car hauler trailers with two 3,500 pound axles would be overloaded with your pickup, but there are also equipment trailers with ramps that are simply beefed-up car haulers. Just be sure it has two 5,000-pound axles. For example, the BigTex #10ET in the 20' length:
http://www.bigtextrailers.com/pdf/10et.pdf

Or if you want to protect the pickup from the elements and road grime, then haul it in an enclosed "race" trailer, such as the Pace American Shadow GT. You want the one that is about 24' interior length, 8.5' wide, and with two 5,000-pound axles for a GVWR of about 10,000 pounds.

The Pace American Shadow GT SCX8.5x24TE3 meets your specs. That one is 23' 7" interior length and 8.5' wide. GVWR is 9,900, and empty weight is 3,680 leaving 6,270 payload capacity for your pickup. You cannot haul the whole world in that trailer without overloading the trailer, but 6,270 is plenty for your wet and loaded pickup with no people in the pickup.
http://www.looktrailers.com/gallery/...hadow_GT_2.pdf

If you like that idea of a race trailer, but want to haul more stuff in the trailer or in the bed of the pickup, then shop for a 24' or longer race trailer that has two 6,000 pound axles, or two 7,000 pound axles, for GVWR of 12,000 or 14,000 pounds. Just be sure you have enough hitch weight capacity on the motorhome to tow that heavy a trailer without overloading either the motor home or the receiver hitch on the motorhome.

(It's fun spending other people's money.)
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Old 06-16-2014, 11:28 PM   #7
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(It's fun spending other people's money.)
Yes it is! I am an IT consultant and I get to that almost every day.

After talking to the boss I am thinking about buying a used light weight trailer to get started and continue to hunt for a nice MH with the ability to tow my truck with some specialized trailers as you, SmokyWren, have pointed out.

That might still leave me money (a little anyway) to put into my current mode of long distance travel but until I get a twin (boss will not approve that yet) some areas of the country are off limits.

Thanks to all the good info. Truly good people here. I really do appreciate all the help.


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Old 06-16-2014, 11:58 PM   #8
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Sweet transportation...but you already know that.

Not a pilot, but did a lot of flying around in a Beech Baron years ago for a Forestry Division...that was a nice ride...

Good luck with your RV venture!


PS. There's a thread around here somewhere for pilots...interesting reading...
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Old 06-29-2014, 07:34 PM   #9
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So I ended up buying a Keystone Hideout 260LHS. Had the RV dealer install the Reese WD hitch with sway control. Thought it was a pretty good deal - $369 installed. With 2 links on the chain the truck and TT were perfectly level. Truck had squat at all as far as I could tell just eye balling it.

Hauling it back the 30 miles, truck pulled ok. Sway control worked fine. Had some cross wind but nothing severe.

Did have one issue. On the concrete sections of the highway the truck and trailer start porpoising or pogo'ing for lack of knowing the proper term. It gets quite severe. To the point that I would not want to travel for any real distance. On the asphalt sections it seems to be non-existent (mostly).

Any ideas? Suggestions? Tires? Shocks? Helper Springs? Air Bags? F250 - LOL?

Thanks.
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Old 06-29-2014, 08:47 PM   #10
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Quote:
trailer start porpoising or pogo'ing
I had that when we were towing with a Toyota 4Runner which had a softer coil-link suspension. It improved once we added a WD hitch, but still some porpoising on concrete roads.

But with my 2014 Tundra ( leaf suspension and the WD hitch) it is steady as she goes even on the concrete freeways. We're towing maybe a 5100-5200 loaded tt.

Being a 2010 truck / Ford, I'm going to assume suspension is OK. Maybe the WD set-up needs more down force to the front of the truck. On my DW hitch I have 3 chains dangling.

Has the truck had a lot of use hauling stuff in the bed? One test would be to jump up and down in the back of the bed to see how it reacts. If you stop jumping it should firm right up. If it still squirms around a bit maybe the shocks need replacing.
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Old 07-06-2014, 01:08 AM   #11
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Looks like a Cherokee 6? Good load hauler. I own a Mooney 64 C model. Also own a Twin Comanche. Probably the best twin available for the average pilot, 155 kts TAS, 14 GPH. If you want more info PM me on that. (50 yrs flying, 20,000 hrs, 7 jet type ratings)
Porpoising on concrete? Used to fly for a trucking company. They built some new twin trailer trucks and found that they were bouncing down the highway on concrete but smooth on asphalt. Turned out to be a sympathetic fungoid bounce because of the spacing of the cracks in the concrete pours and the spacing of the axles. Once the axle spacing was modified, no more bounce on concrete.
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Old 07-09-2014, 04:31 AM   #12
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Lots of good answers already given. Forgive me if I did not read carefully enough.

Having a 3.73 rear end rather than 3.55 would increase tow capacity. If you change rear end, be sure to recalibrate speedo..

If you want to hit the mountains, be aware that you lose power with altitude. So in the high desert of Colorado and Wyoming, you will have a 20% loss of power. This is less of a problem with a turbo charged engine, but still a factor.

Diesel also steps well to the plate here. .....
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