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Old 05-18-2013, 04:51 PM   #1
6mm
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Friction sway control

I have a Open Range Romer RT247FLR with a dry weight of 6550 and have a Pro series WD hitch with a Pro series friction sway control and still get some sway and called the dealer and he told me to put on a additional sway control on the other side.
My question is can you over do it with the sway controlers and make it to stiff and effect the overall driveabilty????

Also checked the tires on the trailer and they are only load range D

Thanks Fellas
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:18 PM   #2
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If you're still getting sway with all that hardware, it sounds to me like you've got either a light tongue or it's riding too high, either one of which will cause sway.

The trailer should be at or slightly below level when hitched, and tongue weight should be 10-15% of total loaded trailer weight....in your case probably at least 750 pounds on the tongue, and a lot more if you're running anywhere near your maximum gross of over 9,000 pounds.

Your (four, combined) load range "D" tires provide over 10,000 pounds of load carrying capacity, sufficient if run at the right pressure but a bit low in the redundancy department for my tastes. If inflated correctly, however, they wouldn't be a cause of the sway you describe.
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:25 PM   #3
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#1- I was thinking of adding the second friction controller is that a good or bad thing.
#2 I have no idea what the tounge weight is and never can find a place to weigh it,no scales where I live and use the trailer.Is there a way I can weigh it myself??
#3 yes the trailer is level to a bit low on the tounge.
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:36 PM   #4
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You can get it weighed at highway scales, a gravel pit, or even a landfill that charges by weight.

There are ways to do it yourself, but they're complicated at numbers as high as yours....

As a matter of fact, if this is a recent purchase from a dealer, he might be able to weigh it (loaded) for you...there are some new rules about giving folks as-delivered weights and some dealers actually have scales or access to them.
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:52 PM   #5
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OK I will do my part and find a scale somewhere.
When I get to a scale how do I find the toungge weight????????
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:00 PM   #6
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Sorta depends on how friendly the scale guys are...here's the easiest way for them:

Get each axle position separately (trailer's two together, truck front, truck rear). Then go off to the side somewhere, unhitch and do the truck's axles again. The math is up to you...difference between truck's rear hitched/unhitched is the tongue weight. Total trailer weight is combination of trailer axles and tongue weight.

Last time we did this, we just went home, unhitched, and came back with the truck- we live just a few miles from the scale...

I really recommend that you give the dealer a call, though, if it's a recent purchase...they might be willing/able to do it for you!

But whatever you do, make sure you've got the trailer loaded as if you're headed out. Water especially makes a big difference.
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:02 PM   #7
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When I was towing I got my tongue weight by loading my travel trailer to trip weight and deducting my tow vehicle weight loaded & unhitched from it's weight hitched. It was 13% of the travel trailer weight.
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Old 05-18-2013, 10:38 PM   #8
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What is your tow vehicle?

~ make sure your RV tires have the right air pressure

~ make sure your tow vehicles tire pressure is right

~ is your combination level?

Just a 10 pound difference in air pressure can cause sway. Your never going to get rid of 100% of sway, but you should feel in control. When we bought our tt, I had the dealer put on and adjust the new WD hitch...One problem, in their prep they never checked the tire pressure on the trailer tires. Both tires on one side of the tt were at 30 PSI, the other side both were at 50 PSI. That explained the poor handling on the 3 hour drive home....
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:52 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6mm View Post
Pro series WD hitch with a Pro series friction sway control ...
Economy model. Barely adequate when properly set up. You should have spent more for your hitch. But that's water under the bridge now.


Quote:
and still get some sway and called the dealer and he told me to put on a additional sway control on the other side.
My question is can you over do it with the sway controlers and make it to stiff and effect the overall driveabilty????
Yes, with that cheap sway control system, you need a sway bar on both sides of the tongue, and both of the sway bars tightened down really tight. You want the hitch really stiff to resist, but not stop, the trailer from turning. That resistance (friction in the sway bar slides) is what helps control sway.

After you're all hooked up, drive a few feet while turning in a tight circle, both ways (figure 8). If the trailer turns, then you don't have the sway bars too tight.

Quote:
Also checked the tires on the trailer and they are only load range D.
Most trailers have load range C tires, so yours are somewhat unusual in being load range D. And with 14" and 15" wheels, load range E trailer tires are really rare. If you have 16" wheels, then you can expect a load range E tire. Load range doesn't matter as far as sway is concerned. Just be sure all the trailer tires are pumped up to the max PSI shown on the sidewall of the tire. That will minimize tire sidewall flex which can contribute to sway.

Also check the max weight each tire can carry at the max PSI. Multiply by the number of tires on the ground and compare the total to the total of the GAWRs of the trailer. I want my trailer tires to have at least 25% more weight capacity than the combined GAWR of the trailer, but most tires that come on new trailers will barely have enough weight capacity to handle the GAWR, and less than the GVWR of the trailer. I usually wind up with blow-outs on the stock tires and then replacing the trailer tires with bigger tires that have more weight capacity. And I usually have to also replace the wheels because the stock wheels are not wide enough to handle the bigger tires. My 5er came with ST205/75R15C on 5.5" rims. I replaced them with ST225/75R15D on 6" wide rims. After that, Maxxis came out with ST225/75R15E tires, so I have those on another trailer.

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When I get to a scale how do I find the toungge weight????????
Francesca gave you the quick and dirty answer. It does require weighing twice. One time with the trailer but without the WD spring bars hooked up. The second time without the trailer, but with the WD shank and hitch head (ball mount) in the receiver.

GVW = the combined weight on the front and rear truck axles. GVW with the trailer minus GVW without the trailer = hitch weight.

Trailer axle weight plus hitch weight = gross trailer weight.

Hitch weight divided by gross trailer weight = percent of hitch weight after you move the decimal point two places to the right. Example:
Hitch weight = 650
Gross trailer weight = 5,000
650 divided by 5000 = 0.13
0.13 = 13 percent

You need to determine percentage of hitch weight before every trip when hauling various weights. Ideal is about 12% to 13% of gross trailer weight. Less than 12% can contribute to sway. More than 15% needlessly adds weight to the truck suspension so requires more GVWR on the tow vehicle. 13% to 15% is okay, but if you're overloaded over the GVWR of the tow vehicle then you need to redistribute the weight in the trailer to get the hitch weight percent in the 12 to 13% range.

But weighing the rig twice for every trip is a bit inconvenient and expensive. So I invested in a Sherline tongue weight scale. Very easy to determine tongue weight before every towing trip - just before I hook the wet and loaded trailer to the tow vehicle. Here's a link to my Sherline:
Sherline Trailer Tongue Weight Scale - 2,000-lb Capacity Sherline Tools 5780

You need to weigh the whole rig on the CAT scale at least once every trip. The CAT scale will give you trailer axle weight. Add the tongue weight to trailer axle weight and the answer is gross trailer weight. Then the math to figure percentage of tongue weight is easy.
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:19 AM   #10
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My tow V is a ford F350 SRW
I will double check trailer tire pressure and also truck tires
Dont have any pavement to use for checking level of trailer but will double check level when I get to town on a paved parking lot.
Just reset the washers in the hitch assy to level the WD bars better with the trailer frame.
I have to somehow find a truck scale to check tounge weight and truck weight and trailer weight.
Any other ideas.
I still have room on the hitch for another friction sway controller if needed????
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Old 05-20-2013, 09:58 AM   #11
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What kind of tow vehicle do you have? A 1/2 ton vehicle will not control the sway due to the soft suspension. You need a 3/4 or 1 ton suspension system to control the sway. Don't let the trailer control your TV.
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Old 05-20-2013, 11:11 AM   #12
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Wondering what the new "dealer as-delivered weight" rules are? State by state law or federal?
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Old 05-20-2013, 11:51 AM   #13
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What kind of tow vehicle do you have?
If I remember correctly from the O.P.'s posts in other threads, the tug is an F350.

Quote:
myredracer Wondering what the new "dealer as-delivered weight" rules are? State by state law or federal?
See section S4.3.5 at this DOT link.
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