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Old 01-22-2016, 12:39 PM   #1
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Help with payload

Hi trying to figure out my payload rating for my truck. Owners manual tells me that can pull 8,200 trailer but can't find my payload rating, hopefully someone can help, here is my specs,
2003 Chevy 1500 HD Crew cab short bed , 2wd , auto, 6.0l with 3.73 gears

thanks
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Old 01-22-2016, 12:54 PM   #2
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Towing capacity is the total weight of the vehicle you can tow.

Payload is how much weight, including of the trailer, that your vehicle can handle. Passengers, pets, fuel, firewood, gennie, gas, *and* trailer tongue weight.

One place to look is the door sticker.

Also look in your Owners Manual.

If you don't know what the weight of just your pickup truck is in going camping mode, you'll need that too at some point.
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Old 01-22-2016, 03:00 PM   #3
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Based on a quick Google search, and what I've read elsewhere about those 1/2 ton heavy duty trucks, your payload is probably well north of 2,000 pounds. Perhaps even as high as 3,000 pounds.

But verify by checking the yellow sticker on your door jamb.
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Old 01-22-2016, 03:19 PM   #4
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Check the sticker on the driver door area.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:19 PM   #5
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Thanks for the help, and please forgive my shortcomings on finding this out. Sticker on door jamb, what am I looking for? Does not have payload # it self, do I use the ft, rear axle rating or ?
Sorry may sound stupid ,but would like to know for future knowledge in case decide to get different trailer later.
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Old 01-22-2016, 05:59 PM   #6
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It's a sticker (usually yellow) that mentions tire ratings, passenger capacity and the payload (cargo carrying capacity). It's located on the drivers side door jamb.
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Old 01-22-2016, 06:35 PM   #7
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Go look at the sticker. If you're still confused, take a picture of it and put up here and we'll all argue about it endlessly!
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Old 01-22-2016, 07:00 PM   #8
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Many owner's manuals will have all the information you need (particularly with trucks) for GVWR, payload, towing capacity, with each body style, transmission, rear end ratios etc. Perhaps you're not looking hard enough. The sticker on your truck should at least tell you the GVWR for your truck. Get the weight of your truck, deducting the weight of passengers, gear and what not from the GVWR will tell you how much payload you have left.
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Old 01-22-2016, 08:25 PM   #9
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Many trucks of that era didn't have a tire placard that has the payload number which is based on a GVWR number. My '03 2500 Dodge doesn't have a payload sticker.
Truck makers were given up to '06 before the placard was mandatory per NHTSA regs.
Your 1500HD has a 8600 GVWR but more importantly a 6000 RAWR 4L80E tranny and a 6.0 gas engine E tire and wheels with payloads up to 3195 lbs depending on the trucks configuration.

The 1500HD can have a rear axle weight in the 2800 lb range which leaves approx 3200 lbs for a payload. These numbers are for a example.
For exact numbers weigh the trucks front and rear axle separately with hitch and all the gear.
You will find the trucks GVWR/FAWR/RAWR on a placard inside the drivers door post.
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Old 01-23-2016, 12:05 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scoutdad View Post
Hi trying to figure out my payload rating for my truck. Owners manual tells me that can pull 8,200 trailer but can't find my payload rating, hopefully someone can help, here is my specs,
2003 Chevy 1500 HD Crew cab short bed , 2wd , auto, 6.0l with 3.73 gears
Here are detailed specs for your truck:

2003Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD Specifications

Click on the above link, then scroll way down to the bottom of the screen to get the specs you're looking for.

GVWR 8,600
GCWR 16,000

Those two specs are hard and fast numbers. You can rely on them.

Payload 3,094
Tow rating 10,200

Those numbers are estimates. They assume no options on the truck not required to reach the GVWR and GCWR of the truck, and absolutely nothing in the truck but a skinny driver. Don't rely on them, but compute your real-world numbers per the following.

Payload = GVWR minus the weight of the truck. So your payload is 3,094 only when the truck weighs 5,506. But your truck weighs more than 5,506, so your available payload is less than 3,094.

Tow rating (max trailer weight without exceeding any weight ratings) = GCWR minus the weight of the truck. So your tow rating is 10,200 only when your truck weighs 5,800. But your truck probably weighs more than 5,800 when loaded for towing, so your tow rating is less than 10,200. Plus the tow rating ignores payload capacity. You will probably exceed your payload capacity long before you reach a trailer weight of 10,200.

So what to do to get real numbers for payload capacity and tow rating?

Here's the drill.

1. Load the truck with everything and everybody that will be in it when towing. People, pets, tools, jacks, campfire wood, hitch (including hitch install kit for a 5er hitch and the head+shank of the weight-distributing hitch for a TT hitch), and anything else that will be in or on the truck when towing. Not the trailer yet, just everything except the trailer.

2. Drive to a truck stop that has a certified automated truck (CAT) scale.

3. Fill up with gas.

4. Weigh the truck with driver and everyone and everything in it.

5. GVWR of the truck minus the weight of the wet and loaded truck = unused payload capacity available for hitch weight.

5a. Divide the unused payload capacity available for hitch weight by 0.13 and the answer is the maximum GVWR of any tandem-axle travel trailer (TT) you want to consider buying. TT hitch weight is usually between 12% and 15% of trailer weight, so using 13% is a good average for estimating purposes.

5b. Divide the unused payload capacity available for hitch weight by 0.18 and the answer is the maximum GVWR of any fifth-wheel RV tandem-axle trailer you want to consider buying. 5ers that can be towed by a heavy duty half-ton pickup without overloading the tow vehicle have hitch weight that is usually between 16% and 20%, so using 18% is a good average for estimating purposes.

6. GCWR of the truck minus the weight of the wet and loaded truck = real world tow rating, provided the wet and loaded hitch weight of that much trailer does not exceed the unused payload capacity available for hitch weight.
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Old 01-23-2016, 09:37 PM   #11
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Okay thanks Smokey,

here iswaht I have found out by door sticker GVWR 8600
FT axle 4410 rear 6000lbs Manual states can pull trailer up to 8,200

Right now my trailer is a 2006 Crossroads Zinger BH dry weight is about 4700lbs with everything ready to roll probably 5800-6000
I am not concern about this trailer , I just trying to figure out what I safely pull if I every wanted to change or upgrade? I seen some 5vers saying that they ate 1/2 ton able but what does that mean really from the most part most of them that I have seen is 7,500 plus weight.

Guess what I having problem with is understanding is how the payload effects the towing weights?
Not to sound dumb, but want to understand better.
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Old 01-23-2016, 11:58 PM   #12
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Quote:
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Guess what I having problem with is understanding is how the payload effects the towing weights?
Weight of the trailer cannot cause the rig to exceed either the GCWR or GVWR of the tow vehicle. GVWR of the tow vehicle is usually the limiter as to how heavy a trailer you can tow without being overloaded.

GVWR minus wet and loaded truck weight = payload capacity available for hitch weight.

Trailer hitch weight is a percent of gross trailer weight. So the heavier the trailer, the more hitch weight it will have. And more hitch weight requires more payload capacity.

Divide the max hitch weight by 13% and the answer is the max weight of most TTs you can probably tow without exceeding the GVWR of the tow vehicle. Divide the max hitch weight by 18% and the answer is the max weight of most medium-size 5ers you can probably tow without exceeding the GVWR of the tow vehicle.

GCWR minus truck weight = max towing weight, provided that max towing weight does not cause so much hitch weight that you exceed the GVWR of the tow vehicle.

GCWR ignores GVWR and payload capacity. So to determine the max weight of a trailer you can tow without being overloaded, you have to compute the max trailer weight based on GVWR as well as GCWR of the tow vehicle, then use the lesser of those two trailer weights as your max trailer weight.

Example: My F-150 has GVWR of 7,100 pounds and GCWR of 14,000. For the trip below, my tongue weight scale showed tongue weight of 650. CAT scale ticket last May shows:
3,660 front axle
3,840 rear axle
-------
7,200 GVW (compare to 7,100 GVWR)
4,220 trailer axles
---------
11,420 GCW (compare to 14,000 GCWR)
=======

So my tow vehicle was overloaded by 100 pounds over the GVWR (and payload capacity) even though it weighed 2,580 pounds less than the 14,000 GCWR. So the problem was payload capacity was too low to haul my load of people, stuff, options, and the hitch weight of my TT without exceeding the GVWR of my F-150.

Stated another way, Ford says my tow rating is 8,400 pounds. But I was overloaded with my TT that grossed 4,870 pounds. What happened?

The tow rating assumes there is nothing in the truck but a skinny driver and the truck has no options not required to achieve the GCWR. With 14,000 GCWR and 8,400 tow rating, that means Ford thinks my wet and loaded F-150 weighs only 5,600 pounds. But based on the weights above, my wet and loaded F-150 ready for towing weighs (7,200 minus 650 hitch weight =) 6.550. That proves that manufacturers' tow ratings are overstated by a lot, so I don't use them in my calculations.
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Old 01-24-2016, 09:02 PM   #13
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I just trying to figure out what I safely pull if I every wanted to change or upgrade? I seen some 5vers saying that they ate 1/2 ton able but what does that mean really from the most part most of them that I have seen is 7,500 plus weight.
Depends on the 1/2 ton truck. Keep in mind not all 1/2 tone trucks are the same.
Some can have a small V6 engine 6400 GVWR with small 3450 lb RAWR .

Then at the top of the 1/2 ton truck class can be your 1500HD with those big 6000 RAWR/E tires for carrying heavy payloads.
Another big 1/2 ton is the 1500 Mega Cab Dodge 5.7 Hemi with a 8510 GVWR and 6000 RAWR. This truck sits on the same frame as the 2500/3500 SRW trucks.
Quote:
Guess what I having problem with is understanding is how the payload effects the towing weights?
Not to sound dumb, but want to understand better.
Towing weights ? or tow ratings.

A trailers 5th wheel pin/GN ball/bumper hitch affects the trucks rear axle/tires so the 6000 RAWR (in your case) will be the determining factor for how much hitch load the truck can safely carry. Its important to know the trucks front axle weight also as its best not to unload the front axle after loading as doing so can severally affect steering and braking especially performance mostly with a bumper pull trailer.
GN and 5th wheel sits over the trucks rear axle (or a couple of inches forward) and adds little weight to the front axle.

GM gives your truck a 82xx tow rating with 3.73 gears.
A 4.10 gear moves up to a 10xxx lb tow rating.
However payloads will remain the same as both have the same 6000 RAWR.
I wouldn't be concerned with a GCWR as you won't find it placarded on your truck ... or any truck.
I would stay close to GM's 8200 lb tow rating especially with those 3.73 gears.

You can swap to 4.10 gears in your truck and gain the same 10k tow rating but payloads remain the same. Many folks do this to gain better pulling performance.

If your confused on how to figure your trucks payload contact your state size and weight folks such as your local area state troop post. Most are glad to help.
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:41 PM   #14
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You people put way to much into this. What are your rear tires and rims rated to haul GVRW. Take the weight of the truck on a set of scales subtract that from the total GWRW of the truck and that is the weight it can legally haul. 1/2 tons are on their own but a 3/4 ton and a 1 ton have the same rear differential. They will haul the same weight. Changing gear ratios from 373 to 411 does not increase the capacity of the differential that is carrying the weight. All it does is gear the truck down lower for more low end power. Just because you have lower gears and them manufactor give you a higher towing capacity you still have the same rear end in the vehicle. The biggest limiting factor to carrying weight are the tires and rims on the vehicle
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