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Old 08-28-2012, 06:08 PM   #1
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Info request please

First of all thanks to those who reply.

We have purchased a Triple E 5th Wheel which if I read the spec's correctly is 31'-3" long and weighs 13,500 lbs.

http://www.tripleerv.com/downloads/p...Topaz_2004.pdf

And I own a 2006 3/4 ton Dodge diesel short box 4x4 quad cab with the tow package (I think they all come with that).

Can I pull that trailer?

Thanks for your help

Ken
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Old 08-29-2012, 06:20 AM   #2
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I may not be alot of help, but I can try to help.

From what I can tell you have a 5.9 cummins engine...the 13,500 is the gross weight loaded and nada shows 9100 dry weight . It also depends on how you load your truck as the combined gross weight also has a limit. What I read is 14,500 for towing and 20k for combined.

You look good to me.
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:31 AM   #3
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I would recommend you go weigh your truck like you were going camping (full tank of fuel, wife and other stuff you typically take). Also look on the driver door frame for weight info. I believe your trucks GVWR is 10,000lbs, and the sticker should say what the "payload" weight is. These numbers are the important ones.

Subtract the truck weight from the 10,000lbs and that will tell you what "payload" you have left. Is the 13k+ the trailers GVWR or the unloaded weight? If its the GVWR and you are unable to weigh the truck/trailer combo take 20% of the trailers GVWR and use that number as the pin weight. Compare the estimated pin weight with the remaining payload number and you can tell if you are OK or not. If your over a couple of hundred pounds I would not worry about it. If your over 600 or more than it could be a problem.

Can it pull it yes. Should it pull it, only you can make that decision.

Good Luck
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Old 08-29-2012, 10:38 AM   #4
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Thanks guys, this sure is a confusing topic for newbies.

KTK
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:31 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenTheKanuck View Post
Thanks guys, this sure is a confusing topic for newbies.
It seems easy to me, but then I have an MBA from a good school, so I'm sort of a numbers guy.

Your truck has numerous weight ratings. Hitch weight rating, axle ratings, tire ratings, payload rating, tow rating, etc. But the only two weight ratings you need to be concerned with are the GVWR and GCWR of the truck. You should never exceed either the GVWR or GCWR of the truck.

The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) indicates how much weight you can haul on the truck suspension, including the weight of the truck and everything in it, and including hitch weight of any trailer. The GVWR is usually the limiter on a 250/2500 diesel pickup.

The gross combined weight rating (GCWR) indicates how much weight your engine and drivetrain can pull at a reasonable speed without overheating anything or breaking anything in the drivetrain. Your Cummins diesel is a powerhouse that can pull a lot more trailer than the Ram chassis can haul the hitch weight

Most of the weight ratings are firm limits, but two are computed and therefore the accuracy depends on the assumptions used in computing those two. The payload rating is GVWR minus the shipping weight of the truck and a skinny driver. The tow rating is the GCWR of the truck minus the shipping weight of the truck and a skinny driver. The shipping weight of the truck is the weight of the new truck without any options or cargo. Therefore both the payload and tow ratings are overstated. Don't use either one to match trailer weight to truck towing capacity.

Instead, after your truck includes the options and accessories you added to make it "yours", including tools, spares, coolers, people, pets, bedliners and trailer hitch, drive to a truckstop that has a CAT scale and fill up with fuel. Then weigh the wet and loaded tow vehicle.

Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded truck from the GCWR and the answer is your actual tow rating. But that realistic tow rating ignores hitch weight, so only if your trailer is a wagon-style trailer with almost no hitch weight can you use that number without more computations.

Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded truck from the GVWR and the answer is the maximum hitch weight of any trailer you can tow without exceeding he GVWR of the truck.

The GVWR is on a Federal Certification Lable on the driver's door or doorframe of the truck. The GCWR is in the Owner's Manual, and usually requires you to know which engine, axle ratio and maybe transmission you have.

Looking up your truck in the 2006 Dodge Body Builders guide, I see it probably has a GVWR of 9,000 pounds and a GCWR of 20,000 pounds. If those weight ratings are the correct ones for your truck, then the answer to your question is no, you cannot tow a 5er with a GVWR of 13,500 pounds without being severely overloaded over the GVWR of your truck. And if your wet and loaded truck weighs more than 6,500 pounds, then you'll also exceed the GCWR of the truck when the trailer is loaded to the GVWR of the trailer.

If you limit how much weight you haul in the truck so the wet and loaded truck weighs only 7,500 pounds when wet and loaded for towing, including passengers, tools, hitch, and a full tank of gas, that leaves only 1,500 pounds of unused payload for hitch weight. That trailer is probably going to have a hitch weight of about 17% or more of wet and loaded trailer weight. 1,500 divided by 17% = 8,824 max 5er weight you can tow without exceeding the GVWR of the Ram.

I could have told you that in a much shorter reply, but I thought you might be interested in the logic behind the numbers. I had a Ford diesel pickup with 8,800 GVWR and 20,000 GCWR. But I ran out of GVWR capacity at around 15,000 combined weight. My longbed 4x2 CrewCab diesel weighed about 8,000 pounds when wet and ready for the road, and I was overloaded with a 5er that weighed only 8,000 pounds.

As a general rule, 5ers with a GVWR over 12,000 pounds is why they make one-ton duallys. 5ers with GVWR between 8,000 and 12,000 pounds is why they make 3500 SRW pickups.

And by the way,
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Old 08-30-2012, 07:05 PM   #6
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[Wow, truly a wealth of information and work on your part to share this information with me.

Thank you very much.

KTK

QUOTE=SmokeyWren;1293649]It seems easy to me, but then I have an MBA from a good school, so I'm sort of a numbers guy.

Your truck has numerous weight ratings. Hitch weight rating, axle ratings, tire ratings, payload rating, tow rating, etc. But the only two weight ratings you need to be concerned with are the GVWR and GCWR of the truck. You should never exceed either the GVWR or GCWR of the truck.

The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) indicates how much weight you can haul on the truck suspension, including the weight of the truck and everything in it, and including hitch weight of any trailer. The GVWR is usually the limiter on a 250/2500 diesel pickup.

The gross combined weight rating (GCWR) indicates how much weight your engine and drivetrain can pull at a reasonable speed without overheating anything or breaking anything in the drivetrain. Your Cummins diesel is a powerhouse that can pull a lot more trailer than the Ram chassis can haul the hitch weight

Most of the weight ratings are firm limits, but two are computed and therefore the accuracy depends on the assumptions used in computing those two. The payload rating is GVWR minus the shipping weight of the truck and a skinny driver. The tow rating is the GCWR of the truck minus the shipping weight of the truck and a skinny driver. The shipping weight of the truck is the weight of the new truck without any options or cargo. Therefore both the payload and tow ratings are overstated. Don't use either one to match trailer weight to truck towing capacity.

Instead, after your truck includes the options and accessories you added to make it "yours", including tools, spares, coolers, people, pets, bedliners and trailer hitch, drive to a truckstop that has a CAT scale and fill up with fuel. Then weigh the wet and loaded tow vehicle.

Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded truck from the GCWR and the answer is your actual tow rating. But that realistic tow rating ignores hitch weight, so only if your trailer is a wagon-style trailer with almost no hitch weight can you use that number without more computations.

Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded truck from the GVWR and the answer is the maximum hitch weight of any trailer you can tow without exceeding he GVWR of the truck.

The GVWR is on a Federal Certification Lable on the driver's door or doorframe of the truck. The GCWR is in the Owner's Manual, and usually requires you to know which engine, axle ratio and maybe transmission you have.

Looking up your truck in the 2006 Dodge Body Builders guide, I see it probably has a GVWR of 9,000 pounds and a GCWR of 20,000 pounds. If those weight ratings are the correct ones for your truck, then the answer to your question is no, you cannot tow a 5er with a GVWR of 13,500 pounds without being severely overloaded over the GVWR of your truck. And if your wet and loaded truck weighs more than 6,500 pounds, then you'll also exceed the GCWR of the truck when the trailer is loaded to the GVWR of the trailer.

If you limit how much weight you haul in the truck so the wet and loaded truck weighs only 7,500 pounds when wet and loaded for towing, including passengers, tools, hitch, and a full tank of gas, that leaves only 1,500 pounds of unused payload for hitch weight. That trailer is probably going to have a hitch weight of about 17% or more of wet and loaded trailer weight. 1,500 divided by 17% = 8,824 max 5er weight you can tow without exceeding the GVWR of the Ram.

I could have told you that in a much shorter reply, but I thought you might be interested in the logic behind the numbers. I had a Ford diesel pickup with 8,800 GVWR and 20,000 GCWR. But I ran out of GVWR capacity at around 15,000 combined weight. My longbed 4x2 CrewCab diesel weighed about 8,000 pounds when wet and ready for the road, and I was overloaded with a 5er that weighed only 8,000 pounds.

As a general rule, 5ers with a GVWR over 12,000 pounds is why they make one-ton duallys. 5ers with GVWR between 8,000 and 12,000 pounds is why they make 3500 SRW pickups.

And by the way, [/QUOTE]
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Old 09-02-2012, 10:04 PM   #7
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This is a very good way to calculate things without all the mumbo jumbo in between. Thank you! The other half of the puzzle is making sure the trailer is not overloaded.
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