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Old 04-10-2014, 09:18 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe N View Post
I chose this tow vehicle because the F350 srw has the exact same tow capabilities as the F250 according to Ford.
Only if you define "tow capabilities" as pulling power and ignore hauling power. The F-350 SRW can tow a much heavier 5er without being overloaded over the GVWR of the truck.

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The fver weighs 12600 lbs empty with 3000 lbs cargo capabilities which adds up to 156000. Assuming that I would carry that much cargo I would still be able to handle that trailer
You might be able to pull that trailer at a reasonable speed without overheating anything in the drivetrain, but you'll be severely overloaded over the GVWR - and probably the rear GAWR - of your F-250.

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So far I have not been disappointed. I have also talked with other people who have the same setup and I have nothing but positive feedback.
The world is full of people that ignore weight limits. Weigh the wet and loaded rig on a CAT scale, add the front and rear axle weights to get the weight on the four pickup tires, then compare that weight to the GVWR of your F-250.
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Old 04-10-2014, 09:30 PM   #30
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I was at the dealer today and noticed a 250 and 350 parked side by side. Now I already know that they have the identical wheels, tires, axles, brakes, shocks. The only difference is the number of and deflection of the leaf spring pack. What we noticed on the yellow door placards is the 250 load rating indicated tire pressure is 65 front and rear. The 350 is rated using 65 front, 80 rear, which also is the max psi on tire sidewall. So the rear capacity is only governed by leave spring package and tire pressure.
Also, there many reasons to only rate a truck for 10000 gvw. Many states have varying regulations for trucks above 10001 vs 10000 and under, especially commercial use. I have seen on the interstate weight scales ahead all commercial trucks 10001 and over must weigh. This is why Ford offers on the 350 a option of 10000 gvw, it is identical to one that says 11500 on the door. They don't change a thing in building the truck.
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Old 04-10-2014, 10:08 PM   #31
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Just a added note to above post concerning tire pressure. According the the tire chart on the 275/75R18, the max load is 3640lbs at 80psi, 3305 at 65psi. This accounts for a large portion of the difference between the 250 and 350.
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Old 04-10-2014, 10:30 PM   #32
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I have the 18 in wheels on my 2005 F250 and keep 75psi cold and unloaded. Never checked it loaded. Yet.
But the 17 in tires were 75 unloaded and 80 psi when trailer was hitched. Figured it was the reason Ford recommended 75 psi.
But moved on to 18 in tires and like the ride. Actually the towing ride is much smoother then the ride of our Toyota Matrix that I had to improve by changing the tire type and size.
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Old 04-11-2014, 10:04 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by iawoody2 View Post
I was at the dealer today and noticed a 250 and 350 parked side by side. Now I already know that they have the identical wheels, tires, axles, brakes, shocks. The only difference is the number of and deflection of the leaf spring pack. What we noticed on the yellow door placards is the 250 load rating indicated tire pressure is 65 front and rear. The 350 is rated using 65 front, 80 rear, which also is the max psi on tire sidewall. So the rear capacity is only governed by leave spring package and tire pressure.
Also, there many reasons to only rate a truck for 10000 gvw. Many states have varying regulations for trucks above 10001 vs 10000 and under, especially commercial use. I have seen on the interstate weight scales ahead all commercial trucks 10001 and over must weigh. This is why Ford offers on the 350 a option of 10000 gvw, it is identical to one that says 11500 on the door. They don't change a thing in building the truck.
What about the rear diff?
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Old 04-11-2014, 12:53 PM   #34
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I gave my opinion. If you blow out 1 rear tire on a dually, you still have 3 to get your overloaded butt to the side. Having hauled more trailers than about 99% of you, having driven in all the states except Hawaii and AK, and having experienced every kind of weather you can dream up which include Thundersnow, whiteouts -50 degree, 123 degree in Yuma and hail the size of baseballs i do know something about towing and I still would'nt tow a trailer that large with out a dually and I think it's disaster waiting to ahppen but I'm an old Pilot for a reason. I didn't bust the minimums, kept altitude below me, too much fuel in the tanks and a 45 minute margin.
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Old 04-11-2014, 07:56 PM   #35
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Checked the part numbers on complete rear axle assembly, they are identical.
Oh I have driven my share too, includes Hawaii and alot in Alaska.
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Old 04-11-2014, 08:49 PM   #36
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I did have a flat tire on the rear of my SRW GM2500. Had to stop because I heard rear end noise. Only to find out the tire was down.
Front might be different story.
Besides better to know the tire is going down then driving full speed on a wimpy underinflated single on a duelly. Like some people I know set up their trucks for towing their RV.
Today in Indiana on I-70, was I ever glad I had the 275s absorbing the humps and lumps.
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Old 04-12-2014, 01:58 PM   #37
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Checked the part numbers on complete rear axle assembly, they are identical.
Oh I have driven my share too, includes Hawaii and alot in Alaska.
250/350srw uses the Ford 10.5 rear axle and the 350 dually uses a DANA 80.
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