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Old 12-09-2011, 09:24 AM   #29
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Several things about tires on trailers.

1: AGE those tires "Came on the trailer in 2005" means they are AT LEAST six years old, and that is nearing the "Shelf life" as it were,

2: Trailers sit, sit, sit, sit, sit, sit, roll, sit, roll, sit, sit, sit, sit.. Well you get the picture.

Tires need to Roll, sit, Roll, sit, Roll, sit (Or even Roll Roll Roll Roll) that sit, sit, sit, sit, sit, is about the absolute worst thing you can do to them.

3: Depending on the trailer (Light weight trailers are prone to this) they may use smaller tires than on your car, this means they spin faster and the bearings get hotter, , this transfers to the rim and tire, not to mention the tire itself is generating more "Heat per radiating surface" which means it gets hotter. NOT GOOD.

Finally, there is the issue of inflation... It needs to be the PROPER pressure for the load the wheel is carrying.. NOT the "Maximum Pressure" (normally) stamped in the side wall and not often any pressure mentioned in or on the Trailer or it's paperwork. since the odds of you loading the trailer the way the factory anticipated approach ZERO.
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Old 12-09-2011, 12:53 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray,IN View Post
I beg to differ. RV tires (ST tires) should be inflated to sidewall maximum. Carlisle Tire thinks this is so important they state in their warranty that if the tires are not inflated to sidewall maximum the warranty is void.
You should not try to reduce air pressure, anticipating pressure rise from heat, as explained in the warranty pdf.
Over 90% of all tire failures are due to under-inflation according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association.
Not all trailer tire manufacturers subscribe to the same philosophy as Carlisle. I bought a set of Maxxis tires for an equipment trailer a couple years ago. They have a load and inflation table similar to the ones used by RV tire manufacturers.

http://www.maxxis.com/Repository/Files/m8008load.pdf

The tires I bought are rated for a maimum weight per tire of 2830 lbs @ 80psi. The load and inflation chart recommends as little as 25 psi when loading to 1430 lbs or less per tire.
That's quite a load range they are expected to be able to handle, and an eqally wide inflation spectrum. Depending on the load the tire pressure could change as much as 55 psi.
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Old 12-09-2011, 01:15 PM   #31
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Not bad for at least 6 year old tires.
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Old 12-09-2011, 01:20 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_D View Post
These are the kinds of posts that make me wonder about tire failures and blaming the manufacturer.
If you lower the tire pressure when it gets hot then you may lower the pressure below that required and be the cause of the failure. Then the owner complains that they did everything right and it must be the manufacturers fault.
who is complaining? Im giving my documented experience... not what some manufacturer claims to deny coverage.
If you inflate a tire to 50psi cold... the pressure will indeed rise with a load on it. 5th Grade science.
After a few miles you can see as much as 10% increase in tire pressure depending on the load. So now you have a 55lb of pressure in a tire marked 50psi max. Tire should have been at 45lbs to start.

Ive yet to see a trailer tire with a specific load /pressure chart. Unfortunately my experience cost me about $1400 in trailer tires over the past decade. Ive yet to have a blow out/tire failure or similar siince following the pressure guideline 4yrs ago. Of course YMMV.
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Old 12-09-2011, 02:56 PM   #33
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I'd suggest the following article on this subject that's coming straight from a tire manufacturer - Bridgestone recommendations.

I just went out and looked at the tires on my truck. The sidewall print says, "Maximum load XXXX lbs @ 80 PSIG COLD." In other words, 80 PSIG isn't the maximum inflation pressure, it's the maximum COLD inflation pressure.

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Old 12-09-2011, 03:51 PM   #34
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Just can't believe that a tire rated at 80psi max inflation pressure would last long in 110degree ambient temp on black asphalt highway running 1430 lbs load...

I say run at the stated sidewall pressure for longest life/treadwear no matter how light the load.

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Old 12-09-2011, 05:36 PM   #35
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The 500 Lb. Gorilla...

A VERY analytical fellow on another Forum had Goodyear Marathon Tire failures under modest conditions. He chased down the topic exhaustively. IMO, it's the proverbial 500 lb. Gorilla in the Room that is not being addressed straight on.

Here's some Search Results for folks to investigate, and reach their own conclusions. I don't have a Dog in this Fight...

Search Results - Goodyear Marathon Tire Failures
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Old 12-09-2011, 06:11 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeatherTodd View Post
who is complaining? Im giving my documented experience... not what some manufacturer claims to deny coverage.
If you inflate a tire to 50psi cold... the pressure will indeed rise with a load on it. 5th Grade science.
After a few miles you can see as much as 10% increase in tire pressure depending on the load. So now you have a 55lb of pressure in a tire marked 50psi max. Tire should have been at 45lbs to start.

Ive yet to see a trailer tire with a specific load /pressure chart. Unfortunately my experience cost me about $1400 in trailer tires over the past decade. Ive yet to have a blow out/tire failure or similar siince following the pressure guideline 4yrs ago. Of course YMMV.
I wasn't specifically saying you did it, I used your statement as an example. But since you bring it up:

If you READ the tire manufacturers literature you will see that the pressures given are ALWAYS cold, after the tire has set overnight and before it is driven more than one mile.

Not my info, this comes direct from the various manufacturers who know their tires the best. Why would you think you know more than what the tire engineers do?

From page 2 of the 06/07 Michelin RV Tire Guide: "If you look at the tire's sidewall, you'll see the maximum load capacity allowed for the size tire and load rating, and the minimum cold air inflation needed to carry the maximum load."

From page 6 of the GoodYear RV Tire and Care Guide
"How much air is enough?
The proper air inflation for your tires depends on how much your fully loaded RV or trailer weighs. Look at the sidewall of your RV tire and you’ll see the maximum load capacity for the tire size and load rating, as well as the minimum cold air inflation, needed to carry that maximum load."

Here's some more reading for those that are interested enough to find out the truth:
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete...e.jsp?techid=1
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Old 12-09-2011, 09:07 PM   #37
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This straight from Goodyears website;
Goodyear max tire pressures
Special Considerations
Unless trying to resolve poor ride quality problems with an RV trailer, it is recommended that trailer tires be inflated to the pressure indicated on the sidewall of the tire. Trailer tires experience significant lateral (side-to-side) loads due to vehicle sway from uneven roads or passing vehicles. Using the inflation pressure engraved on the sidewall will provide optimum load carrying capacity and minimize heat build-up.

And from Carlisle website;
"Tires that are not loaded to their maximums do not require maximum air pressure, and load-inflation tables provide the values that can be used to set air pressure for vehicles whose tire
loads may be considerably less than maximum - rear tires on lightly loaded pickup trucks, for example. However; trailer weight does not fluctuate sig-nificantly with variances in fresh and waste water and supplies, and trailer owners should always inflate to the maximum pressure listed on the tire sidewall. " end of quote.

Its been my experience that tires on a trailer operate in a much harsher invironment than a truck tire. Tires on a trailer slid sideways around each cornor can seperate internal belts. Max pressures holds the tires shape best and holds the tires shape better. Helps protecting from belt seperation. Also rolling over a curb, max pressures does a better job of protecting the wheel from cutting a sidewall.
Now if someone is using a E tire 80 psi when a C tire at 50 psi will work then max pressures may not be the smartest idea.

IMO minimum pressure charts work fine on a vehicles like a truck that the front set steers and the trailing set follows while going around a cornor.
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Old 12-09-2011, 09:43 PM   #38
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There has been a lot of discussion about trailer tires in this forum and a lot of opinions on different trailer tire brands. Like most I want to buy north American quality brands.
We have a local tire supplier that is managed by a gentleman who has been in the tire business since Adam was a cowboy and I have always trusted his judgement on tires for all of my companies trucks, cars, and equipment. His comment on trailer tires is this - THEIR ALL JUNK!!!!!!
He says that there is very few quality brands. He states that many of the so called quality, North American brands are actually not even manufactured in North American. Many of your North American brand trailer tires are actually manufactured off shore, he states.
He recommends using a Light truck tire instead. They are built to a much higher standard and quality and will outlast a trailer tire. He says that they use far better rubber compounds that are more resistant to weathering and cracking. He has been in the tire business for at least 50 years and this forum got me questioning what the opinion of a well experienced professional would be, so I gave him a call.
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Old 12-12-2011, 12:01 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by WeatherTodd View Post
if the tire says Max 50 psi and you are fully loaded... you need to remove a few lbs of air as the tires will heat up under load raising the pressures. If you exceed the sidewall recommended... blow outs and blown belts are not out of the question.
You should also store the trailer tires on wood and cover them.

You can check the pressures prior to rolling...then a few miles down the road if you are using a standard tire guage. Be easier to monitor with a TPMS.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeatherTodd View Post
who is complaining? Im giving my documented experience... not what some manufacturer claims to deny coverage.
If you inflate a tire to 50psi cold... the pressure will indeed rise with a load on it. 5th Grade science.
After a few miles you can see as much as 10% increase in tire pressure depending on the load. So now you have a 55lb of pressure in a tire marked 50psi max. Tire should have been at 45lbs to start.

Ive yet to see a trailer tire with a specific load /pressure chart. Unfortunately my experience cost me about $1400 in trailer tires over the past decade. Ive yet to have a blow out/tire failure or similar siince following the pressure guideline 4yrs ago. Of course YMMV.
Its been explained several times before my reply here, so I'll only say this: Your wrong...
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Old 12-12-2011, 03:06 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeatherTodd View Post
who is complaining? Im giving my documented experience... not what some manufacturer claims to deny coverage.
If you inflate a tire to 50psi cold... the pressure will indeed rise with a load on it. 5th Grade science.
After a few miles you can see as much as 10% increase in tire pressure depending on the load. So now you have a 55lb of pressure in a tire marked 50psi max. Tire should have been at 45lbs to start.

Ive yet to see a trailer tire with a specific load /pressure chart. Unfortunately my experience cost me about $1400 in trailer tires over the past decade. Ive yet to have a blow out/tire failure or similar siince following the pressure guideline 4yrs ago. Of course YMMV.
I posted a link to the Maxxis trailer tire load and inflation table. Here's a picture of it. Note the second line of text. It states: The load limits (Lbs) at various COLD inflation pressures (psi)
By the way the rule of thumb is that for every 10*F the temperature rises or falls from the ambient temp when the tires were last filled the internal pressure will rise or fall 1 psi.
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Old 12-12-2011, 03:12 PM   #41
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I say run at the stated sidewall pressure for longest life/treadwear no matter how light the load.

Joe[/QUOTE]


I agree, those sidewall pressures are Max cold inflation and have figured in pressure buildup due to highway speeds.
I never, never ran junk trailer tires. I always use truck tires and never lost a tire.
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Old 12-12-2011, 03:53 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hikerdogs View Post
I posted a link to the Maxxis trailer tire load and inflation table. Here's a picture of it. Note the second line of text. It states: The load limits (Lbs) at various COLD inflation pressures (psi)
By the way the rule of thumb is that for every 10*F the temperature rises or falls from the ambient temp when the tires were last filled the internal pressure will rise or fall 1 psi.
If you would take the time to email or call Maxxis you will get a “canned answer” about their load inflation chart that goes something like this.

“Use the tire pressure provided by the vehicle manufacturer or retail installer“.

In other words, they will not take responsibility for individual tire pressures. They build the tires and provide the specifics about the product. The Vehicle manufacturer is responsible for selecting the correct tire pressure and making that known to the end user. Replacement tires would have the same pressure (s) if they are the same size as the OE tires. When they differ the retail installer would use the specifications of the OE tires to set a new tire pressure.

FastEagle

p.s. The only thing wrong with the OPs tires is; THEY WERE/ARE WORN OUT! It happens, nothing lasts much longer than it's life expectancy.
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